Socio Economic Policies For Child Rights With Equity
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Socio Economic Policies For Child Rights With Equity Royal Orchid Sheraton Hotel & Towers Bangkok, Thailand 13 – 17 June 2011. Specific issues in implementing social protection programmes. 17 June 2011 Michael Samson [email protected] Overview.

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Socio Economic Policies For Child Rights With EquityRoyal Orchid Sheraton Hotel & Towers Bangkok, Thailand13 – 17 June 2011

Specific issues in implementing social protection programmes

17 June 2011

Michael Samson

[email protected]



Designing social transfers within a broader development planning framework
Designing social transfers within a broader development planning framework

Intra-

sectoral

linkages

Inter-

sectoral

linkages

Inter-

sectoral

linkages



Around the world social protection improves planning frameworkeducational outcomes


And health outcomes
…and health outcomes planning framework

SOURCE: IFPRI



An implementation model possible elements

Examples from Indonesia,

Nepal, South Africa

and Brazil

Admin

Delivery

Single

Registry

Rights

M&E


Core implementation systems for a social transfer system possible elements

Overlap and interface:

Enrolment

External Databases

Component 1:

Administration

Determine Eligibility

Registration

Process

Single Registry

Enrolment Process

Payments Database

  • How do you register people?

  • survey approach

  • on-demand approach

Payments System

Component 2:

Payments Processes


Delivery systems case 1 debit card accounts
Delivery systems-- possible elementsCase 1: Debit card accounts

  • Debit Card is a basic transaction bank account product targeted specifically at the needs of social grant recipients

  • Features:

    • No minimum balance requirement.

    • SASSA pays $1.50 per month per account; includes two free withdrawals per month at ABSA ATM’s or usage at POS with ABSA merchants

    • Usable at any other bank ATM for fee or VISA POS

  • Takeup: More than two-thirds of grant recipients in main province; now in others too

  • ABSA actively cross sells other financial services to its recipient client base;

  • Accounts are also offered to non-recipient clients as well.

  • Source: BFA (2006,2008)


Case 2 smart card at agents
Case 2: Smart card at agents possible elements

  • HSN is a new pilot scheme which pays bi-monthly to households in arid N and NE of Kenya

  • Payment is made by Equity Bank, via a bank account which is accessed via a smart card

  • Smart card can be accessed via agents (shop keepers) appointed by bank in areas where there are

  • Followed a specialized procurement process which incentivized financial inclusion

  • Source: Ferrand (2007), Pulver (2008)


Case 3 mobile phones
Case 3: Mobile phones possible elements

  • DDR scheme paid follow-on demobilization allowance of $25 pm to 75 000 retired soldiers in DRC

  • Review 2007: meant to disburse through 8000 airtime agents but liquidity limited outside Kinshasa so became a cash payment scheme using mobile vehicle

  • Leakage considered low; cost 10-15% even in very low infrastructure environment

  • Source: BFA (2008a)


Programme risk (Fiduciary risk) possible elements

Fraud

Improper allocation of funds

Fiduciary Risk

Failure to achieve primary objectives

Inadequate oversight


Rights protection
Rights protection possible elements

  • Independence

  • Effectiveness

    • Competence

    • Authority

    • Resources

Examples from Mexico,

South Africa, Kenya, India


Complementary programmes
Complementary programmes possible elements

  • Birth registration

  • Fee waivers for vital services

  • Improved service infrastructure

  • Linking in awareness

  • Livelihoods linkages

    • Home-grown school feeding

    • Promoting the “supply” response

      • Targeted inputs

      • Small scale industrial strategy

Examples from

Brazil,

South Africa,

Senegal,

Malawi


The role of pilots and m e
The role of pilots and M&E possible elements


Conclusions
CONCLUSIONS possible elements

  • Developmental delivery systems

  • Role for complementary programmes

  • Role of public/private co-operation

  • The importance of a communications strategy

  • Again, learn from global lessons of experience – but ground the programme in the nation’s social and policy context


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