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Evidence Based Observation Lead Evaluator Training Part 2 – Welcome Back! Have you signed the roster?. “ Homeplay ”. Practice collecting evidence of “engaged learners.” Examine an observation that you have completed, looking for evidence and bias/opinion.

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Evidence Based Observation

Lead Evaluator Training

Part 2 – Welcome Back!

Have you signed the roster?


Homeplay
Homeplay”

  • Practice collecting evidence of “engaged learners.”

  • Examine an observation that you have completed, looking for evidence and bias/opinion.

  • Identify the presence or absence of “engaged learners” in your current observation tool.



Questions everyone in the room should be able to answer about engaged learners
Questions everyone in the room should be able to answer about engaged learners…

  • What would be evidence of “engaged learning?”

  • What are the attributes of engaged learning?

  • What is the difference between an engaging teacher and students being engaged?


Some of your goals
Some of your goals… about engaged learners…

  • I will pay more attention to who is “doing” in the classroom.

  • I want to incorporate what I have learned about engagement into my observations.

  • Prior to the next session, look for engaged learners in at least three classrooms.

  • Encourage teachers to refocus on engaging all learners.

  • Conduct walkthroughs looking for engaged students.

  • Help teachers recognize engaged learning.


Your feedback
Your feedback: about engaged learners…

1. You showed that a high level of engagement is possible at the secondary level.

2. Please pull all this together….

3. It’s hard to pay attention to just one thing.

4. Keep showing the videos.

5. Loved looking at rubrics and how they are different..


Today s outcomes
Today’s Outcomes: about engaged learners…

  • Explain the difference between current practice and evidence based observation

  • Identify and define criteria for effective instruction around which evidence collection will be focused

  • Describe strategies that a district could employ to increase the quality of evaluations and the agreement of evaluators.


Continuum of engagement
Continuum of Engagement about engaged learners…

OCCASIONAL TEACHER DIRECTED PARTICIPATION

TEACHER ONLY

SIMULTANEOUS ACTIVE PARTICIPATION

OPTIONAL STUDENT PARTICIPATION


Ready for more practice
Ready for more practice? about engaged learners…


  • 4 about engaged learners…th grade Science Lesson

  • Students will be able to:

  • identify the components of a series circuit connection

  • compare the components of a series circuit with the components of a circuit connection


Collection of Evidence about engaged learners…

The teacher stated, “Last week, can you tell me what you were building?” “What did we build with a bulb? What did we call it when we had some components?” One student answered , “a circuit.”

The teacher stated, “What were the components in a circuit that you built?” The teacher then called on Eric to respond.


Collection of Evidence about engaged learners…

The teacher stated “What do you think these poles represent?” Students can be heard saying, “North and South”.

The teacher stated “Here’s the challenge for today, can you get two bulbs to light at the same time?”

All students took out a graphic organizer and were directed to draw a schematic of their prediction of what the circuit would look like in box one.

Students were seated in pairs or trios. The “getters” collected materials for each group. All students were building circuits to test their predictions.



Rubrics comparison jigsaw
Rubrics Comparison Jigsaw about engaged learners…

  • Find and form a group with those who have the same rubric piece or color you do( pink, white, purple, blue, green, orange, tan)

  • What does your piece of a particular rubric say about “teaching to an outcome?”

  • Be ready to share the format of the piece of the rubric you have

  • Meet in a “rainbow” to take turns sharing the above information about your particular rubric piece.


Rubric work teach to an outcome
Rubric Work…Teach to an Outcome about engaged learners…

  • Pink: Danielson’s Framework for Teaching (ASCD)

  • Orange: Danielson (2011 Revised Edition)

  • Tan: Marshall’s Teacher Evaluation Rubric

  • Green: Marzano’s Causal Teacher Evaluation

  • Blue: NYSTCE Framework for the Observation of Effective Teaching (Pearson)

  • White: NYSUT’s Teacher Practice Rubric

  • Purple: Thoughtful Classroom Teacher Effectiveness (Silver Strong & Associates)


What does it mean when we say teach to an outcome1
What does it mean when we say “Teach to an Outcome”? about engaged learners…

  • The objective of the lesson is clear to the students

    (Shift from “What do I want them to do today?” to “What do I want them to learn today?”)

  • All classroom activities are aligned with the objective



Learning objectives
Learning Objectives about engaged learners…

What?

  • Objectives state what students are expected to learn in that lesson.

  • Objectives begin with VERBS that identify the level of thinking required in the lesson.


Learning objectives1
Learning Objectives about engaged learners…

Why?

  • Instructional objectives narrow what students focus on in the lesson and help the teacher keep activities, questions and responses to student’s aligned.


Learning objectives2
Learning Objectives about engaged learners…

  • Identify and explain the function of each of the organelles in an animal cell.

  • Use order of operations to solve these two problems.

  • Describe strategies that a district could employ to increase the quality of evaluations and the agreement of evaluators


Video 6 th grade math
Video: 6 about engaged learners…th Grade Math

Outcomes:

Students will be able to:

  • Calculate unit priceby dividing the price of the product by the number of units

  • Compare unit prices to determine the “best deal”

  • Explain the mathematical thinking behind what makes it the “best deal”


Video
Video about engaged learners…


Evidence collected
Evidence Collected: about engaged learners…

“What is the unit price?” was posted on the

interactive white board.

Teacher said, “Today we are going to learn

about unit price. What is unit price?”

Teacher stated, “Unit price is how much it costs

for each unit.”

“How do you find unit price?” was displayed on the white board.


Evidence collected1
Evidence Collected: about engaged learners…

The teacher stated to the students, “Make sure your decimals are in the right place.”

The teacher held up two boxes of cereal—different

size boxes.

The teacher said, “You aren’t looking for the better

deal, you are looking for the better price.”

One student worked on the white board solving 420 divided by 5.


Homeplay1
about engaged learners…Homeplay”

  • Practice collecting evidence of “teaching to an outcome”

  • Examine an observation that you have completed, looking for evidence and bias/opinion

  • Identify the presence or absence of “teaching to an outcome” in your current observation tool


The keys to teach to an outcome

The Keys to Teach to an Outcome about engaged learners…


Thank you

Thank you! about engaged learners…

See you January 31st – 5-7 pm


Evidence Based Observation about engaged learners…

Lead Evaluator Training

Part 2 – Welcome Back!


Homeplay if you have examples be prepared to share them
about engaged learners…Homeplay” (if you have examples, be prepared to share them)

  • Practice collecting evidence of “teaching to an outcome”. Describe what has changed for you as an observer as a result of this workshop.

  • Examine an observation that you have completed, looking for evidence and bias/opinion. Describe what you notice about the types of evidence you are collecting.

  • Identify the presence or absence of “teaching to an outcome” in your current observation tool


Your goals and keys

Your goals and “keys”… about engaged learners…


Keys to teaching to an outcome
Keys to Teaching to an Outcome about engaged learners…

  • Make the learning objective clear to the students.

  • Base the lesson on what it is you want the kids to learn, not do.

  • Focus on the “bulls eye”/keep focused on the target.

  • All instruction is focused on the objective of the lesson.


Your goals
Your Goals: about engaged learners…

  • Practice observing specifically to see if the teacher sets a clear outcome and focuses on it throughout the lesson.

  • Collect evidence to discuss “teach to an outcome” with the teacher. (Did the activities directly relate to the “target”?)

  • Help teachers recognize/classify if the objective/lesson activities are congruent.


Today s outcomes1
Today’s Outcomes: about engaged learners…

  • Collect evidence related to “teach to an outcome” and defend why this is quality evidence of this teaching action

  • Identify the key attributes of “effective questioning”

  • Collect evidence of “effective questioning”

    • Describe multiple ways for collecting evidence of “effective questioning

  • Classify evidence of “questions” as

    • Check for understanding

    • Effective questions

    • Objectives

    • Classroom management/procedural


  • Ready for more practice1
    Ready for more practice? about engaged learners…

    Teach to an Outcome:

    • The objective of the lesson is clear to the students.

    • All classroom activities are aligned with the objective.


    What qualifies as evidence for teach to an outcome
    What qualifies as “evidence” for “teach to an outcome”?

    • Quotations from the teacher

    • Examples/models

    • Descriptions of activities in which the students are engaged

    • Student quotes



    Collection of evidence
    Collection of Evidence outcome”?

    Teacher stated, “Today I want to talk to you about what writers do to narrow their focus.”

    The teacher used a visual of a pizza/pizza slices to illustrate “narrowing the focus”. A whole pizza represented the teacher’s family, a slice represented the teacher’s Grandma Succi, a half-eaten slice represented Grandma’s Succi’s house, and a small bite

    represented the teacher’s experience on her grandmother’s swing.

    Before the teacher shared a story from her journal, she explained the process she took from deciding to write about her family (a broad topic) down to her decision to write about her experience sitting on her grandmother’s swing (more narrow focus).

    Defend WHY you called this evidence of TTO:


    Collection of evidence1
    Collection of Evidence outcome”?

    After reading her story, the teacher asked, “Did I stick to my focus? Is it about my grandmother’s swing and being on that swing—that special time with her?”

    Students read the story aloud with the teacher. Before reading chorally, the teacher asked the students to think about the story they are working on. She asked them to think about whether their story is narrowed enough or needs more narrowing.

    The teacher stated, “In a few minutes I’m going to ask you to talk to each other and decide if your story is narrowed or if you need to do some more narrowing.” Students buddy shared.

    Defend WHY you called this evidence TTO:


    Collection of evidence2
    Collection of Evidence outcome”?

    What did you collect?

    Defend WHY you called this evidence of TTO:

    The teacher worked with two boys during the buddy share time. A discussion took place about the confusion the one student had about the other student’s story. It was decided that the writer needed to work on focusing about the pool—his main topic.

    The teacher stated to the class, “Narrowing the focus helps us as writers.” She added “narrowing the focus” to the “How Writers Revise” chart posted in the front of the room.



    Rubric Language (“Proficient”): effective questioning strategies?

    Marzano:

    Teacher engages student with explicit decision making, problem solving, experimental inquiry or investigation task that requires them to generate and test hypotheses.

    Teacher uses wait time.

    NYSUT:

    Most of teacher’s questions are open in nature and engage students in deeper thinking and further discussion.

    Teacher responds to students’ questions/comments.

    Responses challenge student thinking.

    • 2011 Danielson:

    • While the teacher may use some low-level questions, he/she poses questions to promote student thinking and understanding.

    • Teacher creates a genuine discussion among students, providing adequate time for students to respond, and stepping aside when appropriate.

    • Teacher successfully engages most students in the discussion, employing a range of strategies to ensure that most students are heard.

    • Critical Attributes:

    • Open ended questions

    • Effective use of wait time


    Criteria for Effective Questioning effective questioning strategies?

    • Congruent (relevant) to the learning

    • Invitation for ALL students to think

    • A range of questions are used to extend thinking from a base of knowledge to higher order thinking that is more critical and creative


    Continuum of questioning
    Continuum of Questioning effective questioning strategies?

    High Consensus

    Low Consensus

    Yes/No - Fact

    Closed

    Open


    Wait time what is it why do it
    WAIT TIME effective questioning strategies?What is it?Why do it?


    Video 5 th grade math
    Video: 5 effective questioning strategies?th Grade Math

    Lesson Goal:

    “Have them (the students) have a conceptual idea about division of fractions.”

    -Bonnie Bushaw


    Sample evidence collected
    Sample Evidence Collected: effective questioning strategies?

    “How can I get 1/3 of a muffin? Oh-I saw someone draw a picture. That’ll work. Take a minute to do what you need to do to figure this out.”

    “Ok. Who can tell me how many muffins with a third muffin serving? What do we have for a 1/3 muffin serving?”

    Student stated: “72”

    Teacher: “Can you prove it?”

    Student: “Yes because if you get 1/3 of a muffin, that’s 3 out of one muffin. 24 X 3 is 72.”


    Sample evidence collected1
    Sample Evidence Collected: effective questioning strategies?

    Teacher: “Figure out my 24 muffins and divide them into ¼ muffin servings.”

    Student: “You just add 24 to 72 and get 96.”

    Teacher: “She added 24 to 72, the last answer, is that ok?”


    Classifying to a rubric
    Classifying effective questioning strategies? to a Rubric

    • Check for understanding

    • Effective questions

    • Objectives

    • Classroom management/ procedural


    Video 10 th grade math tess kaji
    Video: 10 effective questioning strategies?th Grade Math—Tess Kaji

    Ready for more practice?

    Lesson Outcome:

    Identify the height on an object using trigonometric ratios.


    Classifying evidence collected
    Classifying effective questioning strategies? Evidence Collected:

    Question of the day (posted):

    How can the height of an object be determined using trigonometric ratios?

    “Write 1 in the margin. I want you to think about this question: I would like you to predict the height of the ceiling.”

    “Does anyone want to share what their prediction is for height of the ceiling?” Two students replied, “15 feet” another student replied, “10 feet.”


    Classifying evidence collected1
    Classifying effective questioning strategies? Evidence Collected:

    “How did you come up with that prediction? Write it down.”

    Bailey shared, “I’m 5 foot 4, so I’m assuming my feet are on the ground. Another me went on top—if another me stood directly on top of me, we’d reach the ceiling plus a little higher.”

    “Did anyone else come up with something like that? You used something else to represent the height? What did you represent? (Asked two students.)


    Classifying evidence collected2
    Classifying effective questioning strategies? Evidence Collected:

    Teacher held up “SOH.” “What do you know about this? You may diagram what you know about this or just write it out.”


    Homeplay2
    effective questioning strategies?Homeplay”:

    • Practice collecting evidence of “Effective Questioning”

    • Examine an observation that you have completed, looking for evidence and bias/opinion (ongoing)

    • Identify the presence or absence of “Effective Questioning” in your current observation tool


    Thank You effective questioning strategies?!

    See you February 7, 2012

    *Submitting Evidence*

    Feel free to bring computers/electronics


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