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Cohort 2004. The Master’s of Arts Degree in Career and Technical Education (CTE). 2005 Cohort.

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The Master’s of Arts Degree in Career and Technical Education (CTE)

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Cohort 2004

Cohort 2004

The Master’s of Arts Degree

in Career and Technical Education (CTE)

2005 Cohort


Career and technical education a field in transition

The field of career and technical education has come a long way. Under new designs, it has continued to serve and benefit both youth and adults. For example, do you know that about half of all high school students and one-third of college students participate in career-oriented programs? Further, it has been estimated that about 40 million adults benefit from short-term, postsecondary occupational training every year.1

As CTE continues to evolve, the field is demanding a new generation of professional leaders with the capacity to lead the development and implementation of new designs, and be prepared to monitor program effectiveness in an era of increased accountability.

1Darkenwald, Gordon, and Kwang Kim. 1998. Statistics in Brief: Adults’ Participation in Work-Related Courses: 1994–1995. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, National Center for Education Statistics. NCES 98–309.

Career and Technical Education:A Field in Transition

“Eighty percent of employers surveyed by the National Association of Manufacturers report a serious shortage of qualified workers. [CTE] teachers must teach their students how to read technical materials in their fields, prepare technical documents, pass written exams with open-ended writing assignments, and use mathematics to solve work-related problems.”

High Schools That Work (2004). Implementing High-Quality Career/Technical Programs at:

http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/professionalDev/2004-05Workshops/High-Quality_CT.asp


The master s of arts degree in cte mission and approach

The Master’s of Arts Degree in CTEMission and Approach

“The content of the curriculum, where practical, should connect to real-life applications of knowledge and skills to help students link their education to the future.”

National Association of Secondary School Principals, (2004).

Breaking Ranks II, Strategies for Leading High School Reform, Executive Summary, p. 6.

Recognizing the changing nature of the field and the challenges involved in making preparation for work and through work more rigorous, the M.A. program in CTE is designed to prepare administrators in all aspects of program design, operation, and evaluation.

To meet this focus, the program builds upon school restructuring principles and connections with contextual/applied teaching and learning, integration strategies with academic education, and organizational fit with community/workforce development systems.

“Students develop flexible understanding of when, where, why, and how to use their knowledge to solve new problems if they learn how to extract underlying themes and principles from their learning exercises. Understanding how and when to put knowledge to use--known as conditions of applicability--is an important characteristic of expertise. Learning in multiple contexts most likely affects this aspect of transfer.”

Bransford, J.D., Brown, A.L., & Cocking, R.R. (1999). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school, p. 236.


The master s of arts degree in cte program goals

The Master’s of Arts Degree in CTEProgram Goals

  • Articulate a personal philosophy of education

  • Enhance curriculum, instructional, and assessment practices

  • Demonstrate administrative and supervisory competencies

  • Establish and foster relationships between CTE programs and stakeholders

  • Enhance personal role as a reflective and professionally active practitioner

Our goal is to prepare professionals who can create effective learning conditions for youth and adults and facilitate their intellectual and career development.

Five goals guide the preparation of participants in the M.A. in CTE program. Upon completion of the program, participants should be able to:


Helping participants build careers in cte

This M.A. program is for practicing CTE educators who teach in or serve in support or leadership positions at the school, technical institute, district or community college level.

For those seeking certification as Local Director of Vocational Programs, the program meets the requirements of the Florida Department of Education (Administrative Rule 6A-4.044).*

Program graduates are prepared for productive careers in secondary and post-secondary teaching, training, and for positions in administration of vocational/CTE programs in local and state government agencies, and public and private organizations (e.g., business/industry, consultants).

*Note: Not including a course in law, finance, etc.

Helping Participants Build Careers in CTE

Administrators in school district central offices oversee public schools under their jurisdiction. This group includes those who direct subject-area programs such as English, music, vocational education, special education, and mathematics. They supervise instructional coordinators and curriculum specialists, and work with them to evaluate curriculums and teaching techniques and improve them. Related positions include Training and Development Managers, Education Administrators (Postsecondary), Social and Community Service Managers, Training and Development Specialists, Instructional Coordinators.

For a full description see: Education administrators,

Occupational Outlook Handbook of the U.S. Department of Labor

Links for employment opportunities in Florida:

K12 School District Employment Opportunities

Florida Community Colleges & Workforce Education


Program delivery

Program Delivery

Offered entirely online (participants come to campus three times per year for orientation/wrap-up and networking), the two year program is committed to providing participants with high quality experiences including personalized feedback, collection and analysis of local data, and opportunities to demonstrate understandings and competencies.

The online delivery format draws from principles for effective distance learning to make learning engaging and, in many ways, even more dynamic than classroom learning.

While working at their own pace, participants conduct research activities, work in teams, exchange ideas, and develop lasting professional networks as they complete the programs as a cohort. Participants’ feedback has been overwhelmingly positive as the program delivery continues to improve.

Guiding Principles for Distance

Teaching and Learning

Learner-centered strategies include modular, stand-alone units that are compatible with short bursts of learning.

Where possible, learning outcomes should relate to real-life experiences through simulation and application.

Various learning styles are best engaged by using a variety of media to achieve learning outcomes.

Learning environments must include problem-based as well as knowledge-based learning.

Learning experiences based on interaction and collaboration support learning communities while building a support network to enhance learning outcomes.

From American Distance Education Consortium


Cohort 2004

Dr. Bill Blank

Career and Technical Education

Office:  EDU 151D

Phone: (813) 974-0314

Fax:    (813)  974-3366Email:  [email protected]

Dr. Blank received a B.S. Degree in Industrial Technology, an M.S. in Technical Education from Memphis State University, and a Ph.D. in Vocational, Technical and Career Education from Florida State University. Technical teaching experience includes secondary Industrial Arts and Engineering Graphics at the technical institute level. He also has worked in industry as a technician, drafter, product engineer and product manager.

Dr. Blank has presented on various aspects of career and technical education and educational reform. Consultancy locations include Africa, New Zealand, Honduras, Scotland and most Canadian provinces and states in the U.S.

Dr. Janet Scaglione

Office:   EDU 151F

Phone:  (813) 974-0038

Fax:     (813) 974-3366 Email:   [email protected]

Dr. Scaglione is a native of Tampa, Florida and a graduate of the University of South Florida . Her Ph. D. is in Business Education/Industrial Psychology and her professional experiences in teacher education have centered on reflective practice, interactive learning environments and the journey to personal passion. She shares her energy, creativity and expertise through a variety of programs and is a frequent keynote presenter for the National Business Education Association and other national, state and local groups. She was recognized as Florida 's Outstanding Post-Secondary Educator (1993) and received two Outstanding Teaching awards at USF (1992, 1990).

Dr. Victor Hernandez

Office:  EDU 151B

Phone: (813) 974-1277

Fax:    (813)  974-3366

Email:  [email protected] Hernandez holds a B.S. Degree in Agronomy. He also received a M.S. in Agricultural Education and a Ph.D. in Educational Research and Evaluation from Virginia Tech. For several years he served as Associate Researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He later served as Associate Professor at Florida State University, and as Senior Educational Researcher in the Center for Educational Technologies (CET)—a center sponsored by NASA—at Wheeling Jesuit University. Over the years he has collaborated with organizations and faculty at a number of universities nationally and internationally. This synergistic collaboration has resulted in a number of publications featuring professional development, contextual teaching/learning, and the integration of mathematics and career education.

Faculty Support

Our faculty have complementary expertise in career and technical education programs; have published, presented, and consulted widely, and take pride in having a very student-friendly approach and feel very strongly that “we are here to serve students”.

Department Faculty

Adult, Career, and Higher Education

Program Faculty

Career and Technical Education


Cohort 2004

EDF5607

Social Foundations of

Education

EVT 6661

Current Trends

EVT

Equity in CTE

Organizational

Mission

The philosophical and social foundations of the field provide an understanding of CTE’s evolving nature, new directions, and the role it can play in the larger educational enterprise in our nation

Related knowledge helps participants analyze and sharpen program missions and connect to implications for serving all students

M.A. in CTE Program Design

“[Career and Technical Education] has important short- and medium-run earning benefits for most students at both the secondary and postsecondary levels, and these benefits extend to those who are economically disadvantaged.”

National Assessment of Vocational Education, Final Report to Congress (2004), Executive Summary, p. 1.


Cohort 2004

Program participants learn about new CTE curricular models, instructional approaches, and alignment strategies with program mission

A key component is an emphasis on the interface of effective curriculum, instruction, and assessment strategies, and innovative strategies for the integration of CTE with academic education and school-based and work-based learning connections

EVT 5369

Preparation & Development for Teaching

EVT 6930

Curriculum Design and Evaluation

ADE 6360

Methods of Teaching Adult Education

Organizational

Mission

Curriculum and Instruction

M.A. in CTE Program

“Schools must integrate academic and career/technical instruction and organize small learning communities with a career focus in order to get students to see the value of working harder in high school.”

High Schools That Work (2004). Implementing High-Quality Career/Technical Programs at:

http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/professionalDev/2004-05Workshops/High-Quality_CT.asp


Cohort 2004

Program supports for implementation are reviewed and analyzed through examination of local practices and benchmarking strategies

Managerial roles and functions are particularly emphasized to stress working knowledge and skills in operating local programs (e.g., budgeting)

EVT 6264

Administration of Local Programs

EVT 6265

Supervision of Local Programs

Organizational

Mission

Curriculum and Instruction

School Structures

and Supports

M.A. in CTE Program Design

The idea for comprehensive change may begin in the principal’s office, but it most assuredly can end there either through incomplete planning, failure to involve others, neglect, or failure to create conditions that allow a new order of things to emerge in the high school. Creating those conditions is often the first challenge…

Breaking Ranks II: Strategies for Leading High School Reform, National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP)

http://www.principals.org/s_nassp/bin.asp?CID=230&DID=47560&DOC=FILE.PDF


Cohort 2004

Participants learn about designing and operating programs taking into consideration the nature and extent of external supports in the community and beyond. A key aspect of related knowledge and skills is the ability to determine and establish a fit between a CTE program and community/workforce development efforts

Another important component is the identification of workplace competencies required for successful participation in emerging occupations and infusion into the CTE curriculum

EVT 5664

Community

Development

EDG 6931

Emerging Workplace Competencies

Organizational

Mission

Curriculum and Instruction

School Structures

and Supports

External Factors

and Supports

M.A. in CTE Program Design

To build the organizational capacity required to promote student learning of high intellectual quality [and career development], schools need support from beyond their walls.

Newmann & Wehlage (1997) on what makes successful school restructuring.


Cohort 2004

EDF5607

Social Foundations of

Education

EVT 5369

Preparation & Development for Teaching

EVT 6264

Administration of Local Programs

EVT 5664

Community

Development

EVT 6930

Curriculum Design and Evaluation

EVT 6661

Current Trends

EVT 6265

Supervision of Local Programs

ADE 6360

Methods of Teaching Adult Education

EDG 6931

Emerging Workplace Competencies

EVT

Equity in CTE

Organizational

Mission

Curriculum and Instruction

School Structures

and Supports

External Factors

and Supports

Implications for school-wide/district and distributive leadership

EVT 6948

Practicum/Portfolio Development

EDG 6931

Improvement of CTE Programs

M.A. in CTE Program Design

Program design, implementation, and evaluation is approached from a systemic and practical framework to establish organizational connections and requirements for successful operation and improvement of CTE programs


Cohort 2004

What Do Participants Say About the M.A. in CTE Program?


Cohort 2004

Join us!

We are currently accepting applications

For more information on the MA in CTE program contact:

Bill Blank

Professor and MA program advisor

813-974-0314

[email protected]


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