Week 6 arits
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Week 6 ARITS. Standards and Objectives. Objectives: Students will be able to determine a theme or central idea in a text Students will be able to analyze a text for its details Students will be able to explain how objects are symbols which aid in a deeper meaning to the text

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Week 6 ARITS

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Week 6 arits

Week 6 ARITS


Standards and objectives

Standards and Objectives

  • Objectives: Students will be able to determine a theme or central idea in a text

  • Students will be able to analyze a text for its details

  • Students will be able to explain how objects are symbols which aid in a deeper meaning to the text

  • Students will be able to trace a character’s development

  • Students will be able to analyze a text for its literary elements

  • Students will be able to write about literature in meaningful ways, comparing and contrasting different texts

  • Students will be able to write about their version of the American Dream and analyze their future dreams and goals in relevant ways

  • Standards: RL. 9-10.2, RL. 9-10.4, SL. 9-10.1, W. 9-10.E D, L.9-10.4. B


Monday opener

Monday Opener

  • What are you looking forward to seeing the most in the movie? What do you hope they don’t cut? What could they cut because it’s not 100% necessary to getting the meaning of the play?


Monday agenda

Monday agenda

  • Opener

  • Watch ARITS


Tuesday opener

Tuesday opener

  • Thinking about A Raisin in the Sun, do you think that Walter learned his lesson and is going to be a changed man from now on? Why or why not? Give examples to back up your opinion.

  • Relate to your life: what is one lesson you learned, maybe even learned the hard way?


Tuesday agenda

Tuesday agenda

  • Opener

  • Finish watching movie


Wednesday opener

Wednesday opener

  • Which character in ARITS do you think is truly searching for a better way of life? Which character wants a better way of life the most and why did you chose that character?

  • Relate to your life: in what ways are you searching for a better way of life? How do you want your life to be different than it is now?


Wednesday agenda

Wednesday Agenda

  • Opener

  • Finish watching movie

  • Vocabulary cards

  • Missing Work check-in

  • Tomorrow:

  • Notes about TKAM

  • Hand out books and collect ARITS


Thursday opener

Thursday Opener

Boo Radley, an important character in our text, is almost like a ghost in this story. A ghost that our two main child characters (Jem and Scout) are obsessed with. What is something or someone you were obsessed with as a child? Tell the story? OR tell about something you were scared of as a child.


Thursday agenda

Thursday Agenda

Opener

Vocabulary

Notes on TKAM

Read TKAM if time permits

Homework: read selected chapters from TKAM


Week 6 arits

The Great Depression


1929 1939

1929-1939

  • Stock market crash

  • Didn’t realize the effect it would have

  • No money to replenish what was borrowed

Many found being broke humiliating.


The roaring 20 s

The Roaring 20’s

  • The new concept of “credit”

  • People were buying:

    • Automobiles

    • Appliances

    • Clothes

  • Fun times reigned

    • Dancing

    • Flappers

    • Drinking


Why was this bad

Why was this bad?

  • Credit system

    • People didn’t really have the money they were spending

  • WWI

    • The U.S. was a major credit loaner to other nations in need

    • Many of these nations could not pay us back


The stock market

The Stock Market

  • People bought stocks on margins

    • If a stock is $100 you can pay $10 now and the rest later when the stock rose

  • Stocks fall

    • Now the person has less than $100 and no money to pay back


And then

And then….

  • With people panicking about their money investors tried to sell their stocks

    • This leads to a huge decline in stocks

    • Stocks were worthless now

  • People who bought on “margins” now could not pay

  • Investors were average people that were now broke


Week 6 arits

President Hoover

  • Herbert Hoover was president at the start

  • Philosophy: We’ll make it!

  • What He Did: Nothing

  • The poor were looking for help and no ideas on how to correct or help were coming


Week 6 arits

What about the people?

  • Farmers were already feeling the effects

    • Prices of crops went down

    • Many farms foreclosed

  • People could not afford luxuries

    • Factories shut down

    • Businesses went out

  • Banks could not pay out money

  • People could not pay their taxes

    • Schools shut down due to lack of funds

  • Many families became homeless and had to live in shanties


Many waited in unemployment lines hoping for a job

Many waited in unemployment lines hoping for a job.


People in cities would wait in line for bread to bring to their family

People in cities would wait in line for bread to bring to their family.


Some families were forced to relocate because they had no money

Some families were forced to relocate because they had no money.


Hooverville

“Hooverville”

  • Some families were forced to live in shanty towns

    • A grouping of shacks and tents in vacant lots

  • They were referred to as “Hooverville” because of President Hoover’s lack of help during the depression.


Week 6 arits

Hooverville


Week 6 arits

Out of the Dust:

The South

and the

Dust Bowl


A drought in the south lead to dust storms that destroyed crops

A drought in the South lead to dust storms that destroyed crops.

“The Dust Bowl”


The south was buried

The South Was Buried

  • Crops turned to dust=No food to be sent out

  • Homes buried

  • Fields blown away

  • South in state of emergency

  • Dust Bowl the #1 weather crisis of the 20th century


Two families during the depression

Two Families During the Depression


A farm foreclosure

A Farm Foreclosure


Some families tried to make money by selling useful crafts like baskets

Some families tried to make money by selling useful crafts like baskets.


Week 6 arits

*FDR*

  • When he was inaugurated unemployment had increased by 7 million.

  • Poor sections (like Harlem) had 50% of the pop. unemployed

  • Instated the “New Deal”

  • Yea! Frankie!


Week 6 arits

  • People everywhere were effected by the depression

  • It wasn’t till President Roosevelt took over and tried to put the economy back together that people even saw a glimmer of hope


Week 6 arits

To Kill a

Mockingbird


Major historical happenings

Major Historical Happenings...

  • Jim Crow Laws

  • Scottsboro Trials

  • Recovering from the Great Depression

  • Racial Injustice

  • Poor South


Jim crow laws

Jim Crow Laws

  • After the American Civil War most states in the South passed anti-African American legislation. These became known as Jim Crow laws.

  • These laws included segregation in…

    • Schools-- Hospitals

    • Theaters-- Water fountains

    • Restaurants

    • Hotels

    • Public transportation

    • Some states forbid inter-racial marriages


Week 6 arits

  • These laws were instituted in 1896 and were not abolished till the late 1950’s (even then still not completely).


Week 6 arits

Scottsboro Boys Trial

  • 9 young African-American men (13-20) accused of raping 2 white girls in 1931

  • Immediately sentenced to death

  • Trials went on for nearly 15 years before all the men were dismissed


Week 6 arits

  • Started on a train bound for Memphis

  • Several white men boarded and picked a fight with the black men

  • Whites were forced off train by the 12 black men. The white men reported the the black men had raped two white girls on the train to authorities

  • They were immediately arrested and tried in front of an all-white jury.


The trials caused a huge uproar amongst the black community

The trials caused a huge uproar amongst the black community.


Week 6 arits

Harper Lee


Week 6 arits

  • Wrote To Kill a Mockingbird in 1960

  • Based the story on her life growing up in Monroeville, Alabama

  • TKAM was the only novel she ever wrote


Week 6 arits

  • The character of “Dill,” Scout and Jem’s playmate in the novel was based upon Lee’s actual neighbor, Truman Capote

  • Capote is famous for amongst other things, In Cold Blood and Breakfast at Tiffany’s.

  • It has been said that he gave Lee Mockingbird as a gift.


Week 6 arits

  • In 1962 the novel was turned into a film starring Gregory Peck.

  • It received a humanitarian award and several Academy Award nominations


Week 6 arits

The End


Thursday opener1

Thursday Opener

  • Boo Radley, an important character in our text, is almost like a ghost in this story. A ghost that our two main child characters (Jem and Scout) are obsessed with. What is something or someone you were obsessed with as a child? Tell the story? OR tell about something you were scared of as a child.


Thursday agenda1

Thursday Agenda

  • Opener

  • Vocabulary

  • Read TKAM

  • Homework: read selected chapters from TKAM


Friday opener

Friday Opener

In Chapter 2, what attitude does the author seem to express toward public schools that use “the new way of teaching”? Support your answer with evidence from the selection and use at least one quotation. In other words, does our author seem to agree that the Dewey Decimal System is a positive change in schools? How do we know this? Use a quote to prove your point.


Week 6 arits

  • Students will get 5 minutes to write


When quoting from a text

When Quoting from a text

  • Use the name of the author and the title of the book

  • Underline the title

  • Lead in to the quote

  • Use quotation marks

  • Give the page number the quote was found on

  • Lead out of the quote/transition smoothly to the next sentence by giving your scholarly analysis of the quote. NEVER EVER EVER use a quote without explaining it in your own words. You need a “so-what?” Explain what the quote shows about your topic. What new ideas it presents to your reader? How does it prove your point? How does it relate to the prompt you are writing about?

  • Connect the dots for your reader.

  • And of course, never use “I” or “you” and other personal pronouns like “us” and “we”.


Example

Example

  • In the text To Kill a Mockingbird, author Harper Lee shows clear distaste for “the new way they’re teachin’ the first grade” (24). Scout, who is much more advanced than her first grade counterparts, shows up on the first day of school already able to read and write. Unfortunately, these are skills her teacher Miss. Caroline Fisher claims students won’t “learn until you’re in the third grade,” and Scout is commanded to stop reading and writing outside of the classroom (24). Being scolded for her knowledge rather than praised for her talent makes Scout feel confused and ashamed to the point where she tells her father she would rather not go to school anymore “if it was alright with him” (39). Through the constant torment and fretting of protagonist Scout Finch, readers are left to infer the author’s extreme dislike of public schools, especially ones who participate in the “new way of teaching” rather than in fostering the individual talents of its highly unique children.


What did the example do well

What did the example do well?

  • Restated prompt

  • Used title, correctly underlined/italicized if typed

  • Used author’s full name (“T”SAT)

  • Explained the quotes/gave a scholarly analysis of the materials and linked it back to the prompt

  • Gave page numbers

  • Used multiple quotes to prove point


Week 6 arits

  • Go back through and edit your opener. What can you add? Write in the margin what you would add and where your opener needs more work.


Friday opener1

Friday Opener

  • In To Kill a Mockingbird, a person’s name a history are all important. The other people in the town know everyone else’s past and where they came from. Is this a good or bad thing? Explain. Also, talk about your own name and legacy. What do you want people to know you for? When they think about your name, what do you want to come to mind? When people think about your history, what do you want them to think of?


Agenda

Agenda

  • Opener

  • Read TKAM chapters 1-3 and answer questions


  • Login