Training Providers Who Serve Mono/Bilingual Spanish-Speaking Clients
Download
1 / 22

Training Providers Who Serve Mono - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 179 Views
  • Uploaded on

Training Providers Who Serve Mono/Bilingual Spanish-Speaking Clients. Tom Donohoe, MBA Octavio Vallejo, MD, MPH. UCLA Pacific AIDS Education and Training Center. People living with HIV in the USA. 2003. Infected without Knowing their HIV Status 180-280K Knowing their HIV

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Training Providers Who Serve Mono' - havard


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Slide1 l.jpg

Training Providers Who Serve Mono/Bilingual Spanish-Speaking Clients

Tom Donohoe, MBA

Octavio Vallejo, MD, MPH

UCLA Pacific AIDS Education and Training Center


Slide3 l.jpg

People living with HIV in the USA. 2003 Clients

Infected without

Knowing their HIV

Status

180-280K

Knowing their HIV

In medical care

With AIDS diagnosis

230,000

200,000

130,000

340,000


Minorities of color and hiv l.jpg
Minorities of Color and HIV Clients

  • Three of every five new AIDS cases in men were among minorities (63.8 percent)

  • Four of every five new AIDS cases in women were among minorities (81.9 percent)

  • Four of every five new AIDS cases in children were among minorities (85.6 percent)

Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resource Emergency (CARE) Act. 2002


Latinos what have we learned l.jpg
LATINOS ClientsWhat have we learned?

  • The percentage of new AIDS cases among Latino/as has increased in the last 15 years

  • In California Latino/as are the 30.8% of the total population yet now account for 34.9% of the AIDS cases.

  • Latino/as receive an AIDS diagnosis at early ages (< 30 year-old)

  • HIV transmission occurs more frequently among (MSM’s and women for heterosexual contact).


Slide6 l.jpg

Latinos and HIV Clients

  • Increase in number of new infections

  • Increase in number of Latinos/as newly diagnosed with AIDS

  • Too late detection of HIV status

  • Late access to health care

  • Misperceptions and ignorance about the U.S. health care system

  • Language barriers


Slide7 l.jpg

Latinos and HIV Clients

  • Translators

  • Translations often conducted by office staff and family, including children

  • Even professional translators report difficulty translating technical, medical, and personal (sexual, drug/physical abuse) information

  • Translators need training too!



Slide9 l.jpg

Culture and HIV Clients

Introduction

  • Culture as a body of learned behaviors common to a given human society, acts rather like a template, shaping behavior and consciousness within a human society from generation to generation

  • - Systems of meaning (language)

  • - Ways of organizing society


Slide10 l.jpg

Culture involves at least 3 components: Clients

  • What people think

  • What they do

  • Material products they produce.

  • Thus mental processes, beliefs, knowledge, and values are parts of culture.

  • “Mental rules guiding behaviors” (according to some anthropologists)


Slide11 l.jpg

We would like to….. Clients

  • Increase awareness of cultural competence

  • Understand the elements of cultural competence in health care

  • Apply cultural competence mindset to your job/responsibilities


Slide12 l.jpg

Cultural Competency in the Health Care Setting Clients

  • Set of attitudes, skills, behaviors, policies

    • Enables organizations and individuals to work effectively cross-culturally

    • Understands importance of health-related

      • beliefs, attitudes, and practices

      • communication patterns of beneficiaries

    • Eliminates disparities in health status


Slide13 l.jpg

When we say that a health care setting is cultural competent ?

  • When this setting has demonstrated awareness and integration of three population specific issues

    • health-related beliefs and cultural values

    • disease incidence and prevalence

    • treatment efficacy


Slide14 l.jpg

Organizational Cultural Competence ?A journey, not a destination...

Unaware, Competent

Aware, Competent

Aware, Incompetent

Unaware, Incompetent


Cultural competence l.jpg
Cultural Competence ?

  • Awareness and acceptance of differences

  • Awareness of owns cultural values

  • Awareness of dynamics of differences

  • Development of cultural knowledge

  • Ability to work within other’s cultural context

  • Healthy self-concept

  • Free from ethnocentric judgment


The aware model communication across cultures l.jpg

A ?ccept the other person’s behavior without judging it based on what that behavior means in your culture

Wonder what the person’s behavior means in his/her culture, rather than what it means in your culture

Ask what it means to

the person, showing a respectful interest

The AWARE ModelCommunication Across Cultures

Noel Day, Polaris Research & Development


The aware model communication across cultures17 l.jpg

R ?esearch and read about other person’s culture so you are able to place their behavior in the context of their cultural word view

Explain what the behavior means in your culture. Demonstrate and or describe the behaviors in your culture that would express similar feelings or meanings

The AWARE ModelCommunication Across Cultures

Noel Day, Polaris Research & Development


Latinos and the us health care system l.jpg
Latinos and the US Health Care System ?

  • The concept of developing relationships with medical providers and becoming part of the team care is a foreign concept

  • First of all, it is necessary to encourage patients to educate themselves about all his/her options, how to express their opinions, concerns, doubts and disagreements


Slide19 l.jpg

Latinos and HIV ?Treatment services must take account:

  • Latinos appreciate mutual respect in social relationships, especially with authority figures. They strive to preserve personal integrity in interactions with others. A person receiving medical or drug treatment must feel that he or she is treated with respect and valued, or treatment will be rejected.


Slide20 l.jpg

Latinos and HIV ?Treatment services must take account:

  • Latinos have a different perception of time, with a more flexible understanding of punctuality.

  • Saving time is seen as less important than smooth, warm social relationships. A Latino patient may see as rudeness a hurried pace or focus on saving time on the part of a caregiver.


Slide21 l.jpg

Latinos and HIV ?Treatment services must take account:

  • Familismo.- Emphasis on the family as the primary social unit and source of support. “Strong ties within Latino families.”

  • Simpatia.- The importance in the culture of polite and cordial social relations. (central cultural value and social expectation).Shuns assertiveness, direct negative responses and criticism. “Como Usted diga”


Slide22 l.jpg

Latinos and HIV ?Treatment services must take account:

  • Personalismo.- Latino preference for relationships with others that reflect a certain familiarity and warmth. Latino may be more likely to trust and collaborate with someone with whom they had pleasant conversations. “We need a friend and support in the fight against this disease”. “Sometimes the providers are extremely cold and professional”.


ad