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Ludwig van Beethoven. By Christopher Thompson. Born D ecember 16, 1770 in Bonn, Germany. Family and Childhood. Born to a musical family Grandfather and Father Strict Father Forced him to practice relentlessly. Teachers and Musical Study. Father Christian Neefe

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Ludwig van beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven

By Christopher Thompson


Born d ecember 16 1770 in bonn germany
Born December 16, 1770 in Bonn, Germany


Family and childhood
Family and Childhood

  • Born to a musical family

    • Grandfather and Father

  • Strict Father

    • Forced him to practice relentlessly


Teachers and musical study
Teachers and Musical Study

  • Father

  • Christian Neefe

    • Helped him publish first piano variations

  • Mozart

    • Briefly

    • Predicted a bright future

  • Joseph Haydn

  • Johann Georg Albrechtsberger

  • Antonio Salieri


Compositions
Compositions

Divided into three periods


First period up to 1802
First Period up to 1802

  • Early Works

    • Piano Sonatas, String Quartets, and Symphonies no. 1 & 2

    • Began to be established as a master composer

  • Began to go deaf

    • Heiligenstadt Testament


“O you men who think or say that I am malevolent, stubborn or misanthropic, how greatly do you wrong me. You do not know the secret cause which makes me seem that way to you and I would have ended my life – it was only my art that held me back. Ah, it seemed impossible to leave the world until I had brought forth all that I felt was within me.”


Second period 1802 to 1815
Second Period—1802 to 1815

  • His Works

    • Symphonies Nos. 3 to 8, piano sonatas, two piano concertos, a violin concerto

    • Became more independent in composition style

  • Financially Stable

  • Well-known

  • Symphony No. 3 dedicated to Napoleon Bonaparte

  • Never married


Third period to 1827
Third Period– to 1827

  • His Works

    • Missa Solemnis, final piano sonatas and string quartets, Diabelli Variations, and Symphony No. 9

    • Music is more reflective

  • Completely deaf

  • Symphony No. 9

    • Premiered May 7, 1824

    • Received 5 standing ovations

    • Could not hear the applause


Death march 26 1827
Death—March 26, 1827

  • Liver failure

  • Funeral attended by an estimated 20,000 people


Fur elise
Fur Elise

Bagatelle No. 25 in A minor


Composition history
Composition History

  • Written in 1810

  • Discovered by Ludwig Nohl

    • He claims it was dedicated to “Elise”

  • Her identity is unknown

    • Therese Malfatti

    • Elisabeth Rockel


Listening guide
Listening Guide

Fur Elise


  • 0:00 Theme A

    • Waltz-like rhythm

    • Conjunct melody

  • 0:42 Theme B

    • Moves to major

    • Arch contour

    • Louder Dynamics

  • 1:05 Theme A

  • 1:46 Theme C

    • Tempo increases

    • Minor key

    • Dissonance

    • Arch contour

    • Crescendos/decrescendos

    • Thick texture

  • 2:16 Theme A to end


Symphony no 9 in d minor op 125
Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125

Second Movement: Scherzo: molto vivace—Presto


Composition history1
Composition History

  • Commissioned in 1817

  • Completed in 1824

  • Premiered in Vienna

    • May 7, 1824

  • Received 5 standing ovations

  • First symphony with voices

    • “Ode to Joy”

  • Beethoven could not hear applause

  • Considered his best work


Listening guide1
Listening Guide

Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125—Second Movement


Section a
Section A

  • 0:00—Strong rhythmic introduction in all voices

  • 0:04—Melodic line in strings, rhythmic accompaniment in woodwinds, strong crescendo

  • 0:28—Crescendo climax, homophonic

  • 0:39—Melodic rhythm in woodwinds, dance-like feel in strings, crescendos to new section

  • 1:15—All sections rest, return to beginning

  • 1:42—Loud dynamic, all instruments play

  • 2:28—All sections rest, transitions to duet in strings and woodwinds


  • 2:43—Timbres changes, strong rhythmic drive, timpani enters

  • 3:00—Strings and woodwinds play call and answer

  • 3:28—All sections play and crescendo

  • 3:45—Soft dynamic, woodwinds carry melody, strings provide harmonic counterpart

  • 4:03—Strings play pulsing rhythm, woodwinds carry theme, timpani is heard

  • 4:32—Orchestra rests, call is heard in brass


Section b
Section B enters

  • 4:50—Mood softens, rhythm calms, flutes repeat melodic line, bassoon plays counterpoint

  • 5:03—Strings and woodwinds build melodic line

  • 5:17—French horn repeats theme at 4:50, strings play counterpoint, oboes and bassoons enhance theme

  • 5:48—Dynamics build, all sections play

  • 6:02—Music repeats as at beginning of Section B

  • 7:00—Variation of original melody, tempo slows and Section B ends


Section a1
Section A enters

  • 7:38—Section A returns, rhythmic intensity reappears as at beginning

  • 8:06—Orchestra plays homophonically

  • 8:17—Dynamic drops as strings and woodwinds play

  • 8:25—Strong pulse by strings, woodwinds play dance-like rhythm

  • 8:49—Intensity decreases, orchestra plays short theme

  • 9:09—Woodwinds play dance-like theme, timpani brings dissonance

  • 9:51—Orchestra crescendos into climax



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