R eminders of some types of nouns
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 26

R eminders of some types of NOUNS PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 63 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

R eminders of some types of NOUNS. A Quick Review. A concrete noun:. Names a person, place, or thing that you can perceive using one of your senses. Concrete nouns: Students Desks Wall Restaurant. Abstract noun:. Names an idea, feeling, a quality, or characteristic. Abstract nouns:

Download Presentation

R eminders of some types of NOUNS

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


R eminders of some types of nouns

Reminders of some types of NOUNS

A Quick Review


A concrete noun

A concrete noun:

  • Names a person, place, or thing that you can perceive using one of your senses.

    Concrete nouns:

    Students

    Desks

    Wall

    Restaurant


Abstract noun

Abstract noun:

  • Names an idea, feeling, a quality, or characteristic.

  • Abstract nouns:

    Danger

    Justice

    Love


Collective noun

Collective noun

  • Collective nouns name a group

    A flock

    Crew

    A herd

    A troop


Compound nouns

Compound nouns

  • Made up of two or more words.

    Toothpaste

    Bedroom

    Blackboard


Moving on to pronouns

Moving on to pronouns:

  • Types of pronouns

    Personal Pronouns

    Reflexive/Intensive pronouns

    Demonstrative and Relative pronouns

    Indefinite and Interrogative


Personal pronouns

Personal pronouns

  • Personal Pronouns refer to certain specific persons, places or things. They change their form depending on person, number or gender.

  • Examples: I, he, they, them, you, it, ours, their, yours.


Practice write the sentence circle the personal pronoun

Practice. Write the sentence. Circle the personal pronoun.

  • Where did they come from?

  • It was a long time ago, in the nineteenth century.

  • Mom told me that grandfather is from Sweden.

  • He brought two cousins with him.

  • She didn’t want to come at first.


Practice write the sentence circle the personal pronoun1

Practice. Write the sentence. Circle the personal pronoun.

  • Where did they come from?

  • It was a long time ago, in the nineteenth century.

  • Mom told me that grandfather is from Sweden.

  • He brought two cousins with him.

  • She didn’t want to come at first.


Reflexive pronouns

Reflexive Pronouns

  • End with –self or –selves. They refer back to a noun or pronoun in a sentence.

    Examples:

    Myself

    Himself

    Itself

    Ourselves

    Jake imagined himself at the wheel of the car.


Intensive pronoun

Intensive Pronoun

  • Also end in –self or –selves but is used with a noun or another pronoun to emphasize the noun or pronoun.

  • Example: Henry Ford himself once drove the car.


Write the sentence underline the reflexive or intensive pronoun label it r or i

Write the sentence. Underline the reflexive or intensive pronoun. Label it “R” or “I”.

  • I gave myself plenty of time to get to work.

  • You should let yourself into the house.

  • The actress herself wrote those lines.

  • The cat itself caught the mouse.


Write the sentence underline the reflexive or intensive pronoun label it r or i1

Write the sentence. Underline the reflexive or intensive pronoun. Label it “R” or “I”.

  • I gave myself plenty of time to get to work. R

  • You should let yourself into the house. R

  • The actress herself wrote those lines. I

  • The cat itself caught the mouse. I


Demonstrative and relative

Demonstrative and Relative

  • Demonstrative points out a person, place, thing, or idea.

    Ex: That was Thomas Edison.

    Is This the very first light bulb?

    Relative: Introduces a subordinate clause.

    The car which I drove is old.

    My brother, whose phone you heard, is a doctor.


Write the sentences underline the demonstrative or relative pronoun label it d or r

Write the sentences. Underline the demonstrative or relative pronoun. Label it “D” or “R”

  • The chef who won the competition studied in Paris.

  • This tastes good.

  • I can’t stand dogs that bark loudly.

  • These shoes fit comfortably.


Write the sentences underline the demonstrative or relative pronoun label it d or r1

Write the sentences. Underline the demonstrative or relative pronoun. Label it “D” or “R”

  • The chef who won the competition studied in Paris. R

  • This tastes good. D

  • I can’t stand dogs that bark loudly. R

  • These shoes fit comfortably. D


Indefinite and interrogative

Indefinite and Interrogative

  • Interrogative introduces a question.

  • Example: Who, What, Which

  • Indefinite refers to a person, place, a thing, or idea that is may or may not be named specifically.

  • Example: Anybody, both, few, neither, nothing, no one, everyone, several.


Write the sentence underline the indefinite or interrogative pronoun label it i or inter

Write the sentence. Underline the Indefinite or interrogative pronoun. Label it “I” or “inter”

  • 1. Many rode bicycles for transportation.

  • 2. Which is the most famous invention?

  • 3. What was the name of the song?

  • 4. Several rode to the event.


Write the sentence underline the indefinite or interrogative pronoun label it i or inter1

Write the sentence. Underline the Indefinite or interrogative pronoun. Label it “I” or “inter”

  • 1. Many rode bicycles for transportation. I

  • 2. Which is the most famous inventions? INTER

  • 3. What was the name of the song? INTER

  • 4. Several rode to the event. I


What is an antecedent

What is an antecedent?

  • An antecedent is a noun to which the pronoun refers. It usually goes before the pronoun ("ante" means before).

  • Examples:

  • Even though the party was fun, it was crowded.

  • People often like parties because they get to see old friends.


Adjectives

Adjectives

  • Describes a noun or pronoun. Articles are considered adjectives. The articles are an, a, the.

    Examples:

  • The area, remote and primitive, is peaceful.

  • The small lions ate quickly.


Check your practice

Check your practice.

  • The little town is in a quiet valley surrounded by tall mountains.

  • Some days the mountains look blue or purple.

  • A lazy river flows through the westernpart of town.

  • The water, deep and serene, looks beautiful with golden spots of sunlight on it.


Demonstrative adjectives

Demonstrative Adjectives

They are used to describe a noun. This, that, these and those.

(yes these are the same words you wrote for demonstrative pronouns BUT now they describe a noun).

Examples:

Demonstrative pronoun: This is the Australian outback.

Demonstrative adjective: This land is the Australian outback.


Check your practice1

Check your practice.

  • Directions: Underline the demonstrative adjective (s) in each sentence.  

  • These international students at the table with us put on the fair.

  • It is held in that brick building.

  • I bought this ring on my finger from a Greek student.

  • Those dolls in the next room are dressed in national costumes.

  • Karen made that African doll in the far corner.


Proper adjectives

Proper Adjectives

  • When an adjective is formed from a proper noun.

  • Examples:

    Proper Noun Proper Adjective

    Americaan American city

    Palm Beacha Palm Beach vacation

    New Yorka New York newspaper


Check your answers

Check your answers

  • This store is my favorite. ADJ

  • Both have wooden buttons. PRONOUN

  • These are the most popular albums. PRONOUN

  • Which test was the hardest for you? ADJ

  • This is a test for Ms. Alonso’s students. PRONOUN


  • Login