Secondary iep goal training february 26 2009
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Secondary IEP Goal Training February 26, 2009. Goal “Research” in MBAEA. Reviewed 100 secondary IEPs Reviewed 223 goals in those IEPs 2.2 goals per IEP average Goal range 1- 4. Types of Goals. 57 – Reading 43 – Writing 34 – Math

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Secondary IEP Goal Training February 26, 2009

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Secondary iep goal training february 26 2009

Secondary IEP Goal TrainingFebruary 26, 2009


Goal research in mbaea

Goal “Research” in MBAEA

  • Reviewed 100 secondary IEPs

  • Reviewed 223 goals in those IEPs

  • 2.2 goals per IEP average

  • Goal range 1- 4


Types of goals

Types of Goals

  • 57 – Reading

  • 43 – Writing

  • 34 – Math

    62% of all goal were related to reading, writing, and math.


Other types of goals

Other types of goals

  • 19 – behavior

  • 18 – career / work experience

  • 16 – assignment completion/organization

  • 8 – self advocacy

  • 7 – financial / money skills

  • 6 – communication / social skills

  • 5 – passing classes / grades

  • 1 – daily living

  • 1 – assistive technology skills


Goal compliance

Goal Compliance

  • 30% of all goals reviewed were compliant

  • Of non-compliant goals:

    • 70% were missing a condition

    • 22% had measurement/monitoring issues

    • 8% other issues


Agenda

AGENDA

Learner Outcomes

Formula for success – well crafted and meaningful goals, rubrics, checklists

Small group work & Report Outs

Goal Compliance Checklist

More Practice and collection of sample goals

Wrap-up and Kaizen


Know understand do

Know, Understand, Do

Know

the parts of a compliant goal

goals must be supported by instruction

how page B,D and F are interconnected

Understand

that transition compliance is a continuous improvement process

that goals need to be supported by good instruction

that monitoring progress yields better outcomes than teaching and hoping

Do

write compliant, appropriate goal(s) based upon transition assessment

identify goals that are not well-written and compliant

create a rubric or checklist

share your product with a colleague


Osep indicator 13 reads

OSEP Indicator 13 reads:

Percent of youth aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the post-secondary goals.


6 critical elements to determine indicator

6 Critical Elements to Determine Indicator

  • Student preferences and interests

  • Age appropriate transition assessments

  • Post-secondary expectations for living, learning and working

  • Course of Study

  • Annual goals

  • Services and supports


Annual goals for transition compliance

Annual Goals for Transition Compliance

  • All goals must support pursuit of post-secondary expectation(s) (PSEs)

  • All goals must meet the requirements of a well written goal

  • If there are no goals for a specific post-secondary area (living, learning, working) rationale is supported in the PLAAFP on page B


Writing compliant and usable transition goals

Writing compliant and usable transition goals

After age14, ALL goals are transition goals.


Goal page

Goal Page

  • ICC standard and benchmark

  • District standard and benchmark

  • Current Academic Achievement

  • Baseline

  • Goal

  • Progress Monitoring


Standards and benchmarks

Standards and Benchmarks

Iowa Core Curriculum

Reading

Math

21st Century Skills


District standard and benchmark

District Standard and Benchmark

  • These should or will be banked on the IEP program. If you need clarification, check your district website.

  • If there is no standard for the skill you are measuring, click the box that says no standard or benchmark is available


Current academic achievement

Current Academic Achievement

Should include when available:

  • Results of initial or most recent evaluation

  • Results from district wide assessments

  • Description of the student’s performance in comparison to general education peers and standards.


Baseline

Baseline

  • Measurable and monitorable description on a student’s performance level

  • Example: Betty’s current score on a “Responsibility and Self-Advocacy Rubric” is 11 out of 35 possible points. She scores a “1” in the area of Responsibility with Studying and Preparing for Tests, “2” for both Self-Advocacy and Communication Repair Skills, and “3” for both Use of Assistive Technology and Future Planning.


Secondary iep goal training february 26 2009

Goal

  • Meaningful

  • Measurable

  • Able to be monitored

  • Can be used to make decisions


Meaningful

Meaningful

  • Clear and understandable

  • Positively stated

  • Justified by information in the PLAAFP

  • Practical and relevant to student’s academic, social and vocational needs

  • Practical and relevant to age and remaining years in school


Measurable

Measurable

Conditions – When and How

Time frame for goal completion

Examples of how

Instruction or coaching

Supports or prompts

Evaluation descriptor

Behavior

Criteria


Able to be monitored

Able to be Monitored

  • Progress will be graphed

  • What assessment measurement will be used and how often?


Decision making

Decision Making

  • Reflect Adequate Growth

  • Used to make instructional decisions documented with a phase line

    • Continue

    • Change

    • Discontinue


Decision rule options

Decision Rule Options

  • 4 Point Decision Making Rule

  • Trendline Analysis


Condition examples

Condition Examples

Time -- In 36 weeks…By May, 2010…

One of the following:

Instruction examples

Reading instruction, Social Skill instruction

Support examples

With Guidance, Coaching, Counseling

Evaluation Clarification example

Using a Transition Rubric…


Conditions

Conditions

  • After 36 weeks of instruction, after participating in responsibility and self-advocacy strategy development activities, Betty will obtain at least 16 points on a 35 point Rubric examining Responsibility with Studying and Preparing for Tests, Self-Advocacy, Communication Repair Skills, Use of Assistive Technology and Future Planning.


Condition stem examples

Condition stem examples

  • After receiving instruction

  • With no more than 2 prompts per hour

  • While working in the community

  • With xxxx job coach support

  • With a 5 minute break per hour

  • After completing CHOICES

  • After completing 2 job shadows


Behavior

Behavior

  • What action is measured? What is the behavior we are assessing?

    • Work at a jobsite

    • Read, write, do math, (CBM)

    • Complete tasks

    • Master skills

  • After 36 weeks of instruction, after participating in responsibility and self-advocacy strategy development activities, Betty will obtain at least 16 points on a 35 point Rubric examining Responsibility with Studying and Preparing for Tests, Self-Advocacy, Communication Repair Skills, Use of Assistive Technology and Future Planning.


Criterion

Criterion

  • What level of performance is expected?

  • After 36 weeks of instruction, after participating in responsibility and self-advocacy strategy development activities, Betty will obtain at least 16 points on a 35 point Rubric examining Responsibility with Studying and Preparing for Tests, Self-Advocacy, Communication Repair Skills, Use of Assistive Technology and Future Planning.


Secondary iep goal training february 26 2009

Robert is able to care for his physical needs and has appropriate daily living skills for a junior in high school…He drives, has a checking account… Robert is able to independently read & comprehend materials written at a 5th grade level. His ability to comprehend material improves when it is read to him. His maximum reading comprehension is 7th grade level. Robert’s math scores are closer to the 8th grade level. Most of Robert’s core classes are team-taught but he is extremely reluctant to ask for any assistance and he does not utilize accommodations or Assistive Technology, such as extended time for exams or taped texts. Although his attendance at school is quite good, Robert consistently turns in assignments that are late or incomplete. He failed 2 classes last semester – Government and Biology. Robert has a part-time job bagging groceries and works about 20 hours per week with no supports from school. He is interested in a career related to the building trades, but knows very little about those training requirements or job opportunities in the trades.


Progress monitoring and decision rule

Progress Monitoring and Decision Rule

  • Used for determining decisions

  • Twice a month, Betty’s teacher will score the rubrics and graph her score. If 4 consecutive data points fall below the expected growth line, changes in instruction will be considered.


Rubrics and checklists

Rubrics and Checklists

  • Used to monitor progress

  • Makes unmeasurable concepts and expectations measurable

  • Can be curricular based OR completely individualized


Goal compliance checklist

Goal Compliance Checklist


Sr27 sr28

SR27 & SR28

  • Does the baseline contain a numeric measure of current performance?

  • Does the annual goal contain the same numeric measure of performance as the baseline?


Sr30 a b c

SR30 a, b, c

  • (a) Conditions (when and how the individual will perform)?

  • (b) Skill or behavior (what the individual will do)?

  • (c) Criterion (the acceptable level of performance at the end of the goal period)?


Sr31 sr32

SR31 & SR32

  • Do the evaluations/progress monitoring procedures identify how ( a procedure by which) progress will be measured?

    AND

  • Do the evaluation/progress monitoring procedures identify how often (frequency that) progress will be measured?


Secondary iep goal training february 26 2009

SR33

  • Can the goal be monitored using the procedures described in the Evaluation/Progress Monitoring procedure section of the IEP?


Secondary iep goal training february 26 2009

SR34

  • Is the goal stated above based on the district standards and benchmarks?


Sr34 a b

SR34 a, b

  • (a) Is a decision rule stated that will be used to consider the need for instructional changes?

  • (b) Have the data as described in the Evaluation/Progress Monitoring procedures section of the IEP been collected and documented?


Secondary iep goal training february 26 2009

SR35

  • Are the decisions to continue or change instruction made based on progress monitoring data?


Final activity

Final Activity

Work in pairs to develop a goal and/or rubric with your current IEP.

These will be collected and posted.


For more information

For more information:

  • Marty Paul, Mississippi Bend AEA

    563-344-6277

  • Chuck Solheim, Mississippi Bend AEA

    563-344-6309

  • Jane Rock, Mississippi Bend AEA

    563-344-6288

  • Michelle Wehr, Mississippi Bend AEA

    563-344-6292

  • Bruce Noah, Davenport Community Schools

    563-336-3835

    The Mississippi Bend Area Education Agency does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, gender identity, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, age or disability in its educational programs, services or employment practices. Inquiries concerning this statement should be addressed to the Equity Coordinator, 729 – 21st Street, Bettendorf, Iowa  52722, Phone:  563-344-6410.


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