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Illinois Basin Coal Issues. AEP BRO Forum 2013 7/30/2013 By Pat Malone. Illinois Basin. 8000 to 9000 BTU/lb 0.5 to 1.1 lb SO2/mmBTU low fusion ash Rail Transportation to the East. 11,000 to 12,200 BTU/lb 1.8 to 5.5 lb SO2/mmBTU low fusion ash 0 to 0.5% Chlorine.

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illinois basin coal issues

Illinois Basin Coal Issues

AEP BRO Forum 2013

7/30/2013

By Pat Malone

where is the ilb region

Illinois Basin

  • 8000 to 9000 BTU/lb
  • 0.5 to 1.1 lb SO2/mmBTU
  • low fusion ash
  • Rail Transportation to the East
  • 11,000 to 12,200 BTU/lb
  • 1.8 to 5.5 lb SO2/mmBTU
  • low fusion ash
  • 0 to 0.5% Chlorine

Northern

Appalachian

  • 12,000 to 13,000 BTU/lb
  • 4 to 7 lb SO2/mmBTU
  • low fusion ash
  • Rail and Barge access

CO/UT Uinta

Basin

Central

Appalachian

Powder River Basin

  • 11,000 to 12,300 BTU/lb
  • 0.8 to 1.5 lb SO2/mmBTU
  • high fusion ash
  • Limited Rail
  • 11,800 to 12,400 BTU/lb
  • 0.8 to 2 lb SO2/mmBTU
  • medium to high fusion ash

Texas Lignite

  • 6.000 to 7,000 BTU/lb
  • 2 to 3.5 lb SO2/mmBTU
  • low fusion ash
  • Mine Mouth Plants
Where is the ILB Region
why ilb
Why ILB?
  • Proximity to AEP facilities, reduces shipping costs
  • The ILB is accessible from the Ohio River, and the Mississippi
  • Aspects of ILB fuels make it a cheaper fuel.
    • Chlorine Content
    • Sulfur Content
    • Low Fusion Ash
  • ILB as a low cost alternative to NAPP Fuel.
concerns with ilb
Concerns with ILB
  • Chlorine Content:
    • Fouling-high temperature bonded deposits that occur in the reheat and superheater regions of the convection pass that are not exposed to radiation.
      • Fouling is determined by the amounts of alkalis in the ash, primarily sodium and potassium compounds that vaporize during combustion and condense at approximately 1700-1500F.
      • These condensed alkalis act as the glue that bonds dry ash particles together.
      • Sodium chloride is very active and indicates a fuel with potentially high fouling tendencies. The chlorine is an indicator of the amount of sodium.
      • Fouling reduces heat transfer, and causes channeling of high velocity gas that erodes the boiler tubes.
    • High fouling coals should only be used in boilers with wide convection pass spacing, and adequate soot blowing.
    • Corrosion-chlorine is a halogen and a very good oxidizer.
      • Furnace tube wastage especially with staged combustion (reducing). Supercritical steam generators worse than subcriticals due to tube metal temperatures.
      • Stainless Steel Superheaters
      • FGD stainless steel components
blending
Blending
  • AEP currently limits Fuel Source Chlorine to 0.2% by weight.
    • We have completed test burns at a number of facilities that have blending capability and were able to maintain a blend of ILB/Ea. Bit.
    • Successfully staying below the 0.2% Cl limit
    • We are comfortable with the “supervised” use of ILB coals
    • Blending with PRB is difficult because of the sodium in the PRB.
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