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Session 2: Current State of Military Investment in PAR. Panel Lead: Dr. Jeffrey Herd (MIT LL) Panelists: Dr. Richard Wittstruck, U.S. Army PEO IEW&S Dr. Michael Pollock, Office of Naval Research Mr. Mark Longbrake, Air Force Research Lab

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Session 2 current state of military investment in par
Session 2: Current State of Military Investment in PAR

Panel Lead: Dr. Jeffrey Herd (MIT LL)

Panelists: Dr. Richard Wittstruck, U.S. Army PEO IEW&S

Dr. Michael Pollock, Office of Naval Research

Mr. Mark Longbrake, Air Force Research Lab

Panel Time Slot: 10:15 – 11:45 on Thursday, October 11, 2007

Panel Presentations:

  • Background and Session Objectives, J. Herd

  • Army’s Digital Array Radars, R. Wittstruck

  • R&D in Navy’s Phased Array Radar Program, M. Pollock

  • AF Research into PAR Antenna Design, M. Longbrake

  • Discussion


Objectives of the session
Objectives of the Session

  • Provide a current snapshot of military investments in phased array radars

  • Identify emerging technologies and concepts from military investments that are relevant to MPAR

  • Identify technology gaps that must be addressed directly to meet MPAR needs

  • Identify collaborative opportunities to jointly increase procurement quantities and reduce cost


National Air Surveillance Infrastructure

ARSR-3

ASR-9

TDWR

ASR-11

ASR-8

ASR-11

ARSR-1/2

ARSR-3

NEXRAD

TDWR

En Route

Terminal

Air Surveillance

(ARSR-4)

Range 250 nmi

Beamwidth 1.4o x 2o

Scan time 12 sec

Weather

(NEXRAD)

Range 85 nmi

Beamwidth 1o x 1o

Scan time 240 sec

Air Surveillance

(ASR-9/11)

Range 60 nmi

Beamwidth 1.4o x 5o

Scan time 5 sec

Weather

(TDWR)

Range 100 nmi

Beamwidth 1o x 0.5o

Scan time 180 sec

Today

Timeline and Capabilities

?

ASR-9

ARSR-4

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

2020

2030

  • Aging mechanically scanned radars

  • 8 unique types for 4 different missions

  • Over 500 total with redundant spatial coverage


ASR-8

ASR-11

ARSR-1/2

ARSR-3

NEXRAD

TDWR

National Air Surveillance Infrastructure

Today

MPAR

ASR-9

ARSR-4

  • Aging mechanically scanned radars

  • 8 unique types for 4 different missions

  • Over 500 total with redundant spatial coverage

  • State-of-the-art active phased array radars

  • 1 type for all missions: Multifunction Phased Array Radar (MPAR)

  • 334 MPARs replace 510 legacy radars


Current Surveillance Radar Capabilities

  • Weather surveillance drives radar power and aperture size

  • Aircraft surveillance drives volume scan update rates


Notional Full-Scale MPAR Parameters

  • Active Array (planar, 4 faces)

    Diameter: 8 m

    TR elements/face: 20,000

    Dual polarization

    Beamwidth: 0.7 (broadside)

    Gain: > 46 dB

  • Transmit/Receive Modules

    Wavelength: 10 cm (2.7–2.9 GHz)

    Bandwidth/channel: 1 MHz

    Frequency channels: 3

    Pulse length: 30 s

    Peak power/element: 2 W

  • Architecture

    Multiple independent beam clusters

Aircraft Surveillance

Non cooperative target tracking and characterization

Weather Surveillance

  • Notional MPAR NAS system (167 full-scale, 167 terminal area) requires > 16 million active T/R elements


Critical challenges and enablers
Critical Challenges and Enablers

Challenges:

  • Ultra-low cost array (~ $50k / m2 at S-band)

  • Scalable aperture sizes

  • Open architecture

  • Low operations and maintenance costs

    Enablers:

  • Highly integrated low power T/R chips

  • Scalable array sub-panels

  • Air cooled array

  • Design for manufacturability

  • High volume procurement


Questions for discussion
Questions for Discussion

  • How will differences in mission requirements impact tech-transfer and collaboration?

    • Peak power

    • Bandwidth

    • Operating frequency

    • Production volume

    • Mil-spec vs commercial standards

    • U.S. vs overseas manufacturing

  • What collaborative opportunities exist to jointly increase procurement quantities and reduce cost?

  • How can we best determine an optimum solution for combined NWS, FAA, DHS, and DoD needs?


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