Challenge question what is the minimum size of the chamber note we know its 4ft high
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Challenge Question: What is the minimum size of the chamber? Note: we know its 4ft high PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Challenge Question: What is the minimum size of the chamber? Note: we know its 4ft high. *0.20=89.8mol O 2.

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Challenge Question: What is the minimum size of the chamber? Note: we know its 4ft high

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Challenge question what is the minimum size of the chamber note we know its 4ft high

Challenge Question: What is the minimum size of the chamber?Note: we know its 4ft high

*0.20=89.8mol O2

Given that the average human needs about 11,000 liters of air per day, and air is approximately 20% oxygen determine the minimum amount of moles of oxygen that must have been present in the bubble.

At 30 meters (depth of the boat sinking) the pressure is 4 atm, assume the water was 60 F (15.5 C). Determine the volume that the amount of air you calculated above would take.

Given that height is 4ft or 1.2 meters and assuming a square area:


What assumptions did we make are these valid

What assumptions did we make? Are these valid?

So what is the verdict when all these are factored in? A space of about 25-177 meters required.

  • Carbon dioxide toxicity doesn’t exist.

    • Not valid: this should have killed him, why didn’t it?

  • All oxygen could be used, aka minimum concentration for absorption not required.

    • Not valid: you would need to keep a minimum amount of oxygen in the air or else your lungs would not be able to absorb the oxygen

  • No gas exchange with the water

    • This is what helped save him. The water acted like a carbon dioxide sink. Its also possible small amounts of O2 came out of the water into the air pocket.

  • No metabolism change

    • The cold water could have certainly changed his metabolism.


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