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2013-2014. Note taking and the Scientific Method. Your Science Notebook!. LEFT SIDE. RIGHT SIDE. STUDENT NOTES Drawings Mind maps Venn diagrams KWL charts Group work SQ3R notes Self-reflections J-TPS QUESTIONS!!!. TEACHER NOTES Class notes Laboratory notes Science vocabulary

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2013-2014

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2013-2014

Note taking and the Scientific Method


Your Science Notebook!

LEFT SIDE

RIGHT SIDE

  • STUDENT NOTES

  • Drawings

  • Mind maps

  • Venn diagrams

  • KWL charts

  • Group work

  • SQ3R notes

  • Self-reflections

  • J-TPS

  • QUESTIONS!!!

  • TEACHER NOTES

  • Class notes

  • Laboratory notes

  • Science vocabulary

  • Standards

  • Objectives


On the right side

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page #Topic

1 The Scientific Method

((This side should be blank))


Turn the page


Number the right side pages only!!

1


Number the right side pages only!!

Turn the page again…

2


Number the right side pages only!!

and again… and again…

3


ICONS for Note-taking:

= write this information in your

notebook! RIGHT SIDE

= Quick check: grab a whiteboard

and a dry erase marker

= Think Box- J-TPS, your thoughts,

sentences, bullet points, drawings

LEFT SIDE


Brain Bubble

Whenever you see this icon, draw a visual representation of the idea you are learning about on the

LEFT SIDE

  • Sometimes this will be a diagram,

  • Sometimes it will be an analogy

  • Sometimes it will be something that only you understand!


Turn to page #1

1


Date: August ____, 2013

Standard IE 1.a: Students know how to distinguish between hypothesis and theory as scientific terms.

The Scientific Method


On the left side

The Scientific Method

Date: August _____ 2013

Standard IE 1.a: Students know how to distinguish between hypothesis and theory as scientific terms

Q: What’s the difference between hypothesis and theory??


Does your notebook look like this? Yes! GOOD!

The Scientific Method

Date: August _____ 2013

Standard IE 1.a: Students know how to distinguish between hypothesis and

theory as scientific terms

Q: What’s the difference between

hypothesis and theory??


Observation

  • gathering information using your five senses:

    • sight

    • hearing

    • taste

    • touch

    • smell


On the right side

The Scientific Method

  • Date: August _____ 2013

  • Standard IE 1.a: Students know how to distinguish between hypothesis and theory

  • as scientific terms

  • Observation

  • Gathering information using your 5 senses

    • Sight

    • Hearing

    • Taste

    • Touch

    • Smell

Q: What’s the difference between

hypothesis and theory??


Does your notebook look like this? Yes! GOOD!

The Scientific Method

  • Date: August _____ 2013

  • Standard IE 1.a: Students know how to distinguish between hypothesis and

  • theory as scientific terms

  • Observation

  • Gathering information using your 5 senses

    • Sight

    • Hearing

    • Taste

    • Touch

    • Smell

Q: What’s the difference between

hypothesis and theory??


Data

  • Information gathered from your 5 senses

Quantitative - can be counted

(5 chairs, 10,000 students)

Qualitative - cannot be counted

(blue sky, long hair, spicy food)


Quantitative or Qualitative?T or L

Blue sky

qualitative-L

25 clouds

quantitative-T

Sixty-eight degrees

quantitative-T

10 ipods

quantitative-T

Smelly feet

qualitative-L

95% correct

quantitative-T

Most wonderful teacher in the world

Mrs. D’Andrea

Seven Billion People

quantitative-T


Inference:

  • A logical interpretation based on prior knowledge or experience

    (you figure it out based on stuff you already know!)


Aproposed scientific explanation for a set of observations-if…then…

Hypothesis

MUST BE TESTABLE!!!


On the left side

J-TPS: Justify- Think- Pair- Share

Think

Pair

Write your thoughts

1 min

Steal your neighbor’s ideas

2 min

Share and collect the best ideas from the class

3 min

Share


J-TPS (Justify- Think-Pair-Share)

Is the following sentence a good Hypothesis?

If you die, then you will go to heaven?

Why or why not?


Theory:

a WELL-TESTED explanation for a series of observations

Examples: Gravity, Evolution,

Cell Theory, Germ Theory

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/library/11/2/quicktime/e_s_1.html


Theories…

  • are based on lots and lots and lots of experiments

  • are supported by lots and lots and lots of evidence.

  • can change, but only SLIGHTLY (a little bit) if new evidence is found.


How do you feelabout all of this?

Sorry, but science doesn’t involve feelings or beliefs!

Science uses data from observations and evidence from investigations to draw conclusions and make predictions about the way the world works.

Science should avoid bias!

Most scientific questions don’t actually have real answers- they just open up more questions!


Working with a partner, make a table to compare hypotheses and theories


HypothesisvsTheory


Let’s see…

EXIT SLIP!!


Investigation and Experimentation

Units of Measurement, Graphing, and Data Analysis in Science


Standards

(IE) Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other four strands, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will:

  • IE a. Select and use appropriate tools and technology (such as computer-linked probes, spreadsheets, and graphing calculators) to perform tests, collect data, analyze relationships, and display data.


Objectives:

  • gain an understanding of the basic units of measurement in science.

  • use a basic tool of measurement to gain accurate data, graph the data, and analyze it.

  • to collect and analyze multiple sources of data/scientific evidence.


What is matter?

  • Matter-any substance that has mass and takes up space


How is matter measured in science?

  • Mass-the amount of matter a substance/object has (grams)

  • Volume-the amount of space a substance/object takes up (liters)

  • Length-the distance between points (meters)


Mass

Volume

Length

Triple-beam balance

Graduated cylinder/beaker

Meter stick/ruler

What are the tools of measurement in science?


Mass-Triple-beam balance


Volume-Graduated Cylinder


Length-Meters


How are graphs used in Science?

  • Visually shows the relationship between two variables

  • Independent variable (x-axis)-causes a change in the dependent variable

  • Dependent variable-measureable outcome (y-axis)

  • Graphs are used to display and analyze data from experiments and observations


Data Analysis in Science

  • Data is collected.

  • The data is displayed in graphs.

  • The data is analyzed (ie patterns, trends, and insights).

  • Scientific Thinking-Evaluation of results and hypotheses


Line Graph

Pie Graph

Bar Graph

Used to track changes over short/long periods of time.

Compare parts of a whole.

Used to compare between different groups or track large changes over time.

When are the different types of graphs used?


Collaborative Mode

Graphing Practice.

  • Locate the Graphing Lab in the file cabinet. Complete the lab with a partner

  • Please review the expectations for collaborative station.


Summary Questions:

  • How is matter defined?

  • What are some of the tools scientists use to measure matter?

  • How are graphs used in science?


How well do you understand the difference between a hypothesis and a theory?

4 = I totally understand it and I could explain it to someone else 

3 = I mostly understand it but I would have difficulty explaining it to someone else

= I understand some of it, but there are

still some parts that are confusing

1 = I do not understand it at all 


Vocabulary

  • Entirely-

  • Reproduce

  • Asexually

  • Develop

  • Response

  • Unfavorable


Daphnia are small creatures that live in water. They are almost entirely female and reproduce asexually (they don’t need a partner). However, malesare sometimes observed in water with low oxygen or when there is not a lot of available food. Based on these observations, a researcher suggests that male Daphnia develop in response to unfavorable environmental conditions. This is an example of a A) result.B) theory.C) procedure.D) hypothesis.Explain:


The Scientific Method:

Designing an Experiment

Standard:

Objective:


Watch this!

Monty Python…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrzMhU_4m-g

Write down at least 3 things the villagers did (scientifically) wrong:

1.

2.

3.


http://glencoe.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/dl/free/0078802849/164155/00044686.html

Brain pop!


Steps:

  • Ask a Question/Make Observations

  • Form a Hypothesis

  • Set up a Controlled Experiment

  • Record and Analyze Results

  • Draw Conclusions

  • Repeat the Investigation


Question:

  • Do plants need water to grow?


Observations:

  • When I don’t water my plants, the leaves droop and they get all brown.

  • When I water my plants, the leaves perk up and new green leaves grow


Hypothesis:

  • Plants need water to grow.


Designing an Experiment:Do plants need water to grow?

Control:something that stays the same; the thing or group getting the “normal” treatment in an experiment

  • Plants normally get water, so one plant will receive water. This will be the control.


Variables: things that change

  • Independent (manipulated) variable: the one thing you change on purpose in an experiment (water)

  • Dependent (responding) variable: the thing that changes because of the independent variable (plant growth)


Important!!

A hypothesis should be tested by an experiment in which only

ONE VARIABLE

is changed at a time.

All other variables should be kept unchanged, or controlled.


What’s wrong with this experiment?

One plant is given water and placed by the open window. One plant is given no water and placed on the table in the middle of the room. After one week, the plant with the water is growing strong, but the plant with no water is dying. I conclude that plants need water to grow.


What’s wrong with this experiment?

One plant is given water and placed by the open window. One plant is given no water and placed on the table in the middle of the room. After one week, the plant with the water is growing strong, but the plant with no water is dying. I conclude that plants need water to grow.

TOO MANY VARIABLES!!!

Is it the water or the lightthat makes plants grow??


J-TPS: OOPS!

In science, as in life, there are some things that cannot be avoided- like errors, mistakes, and problems.

What kinds of unavoidable errors could exist in a scientific experiment?


Sources of Unavoidable Error:

  • things that scientists have little or no control over

earthquakes

variation (or differences)

in living things

weather

Equipment failure

bias

human error


Independent Mode

  • Complete the paper airplane lab.


PICTIONARY!

  • Work in pairs

  • One students has his/her back to the board

  • One student faces the board.

  • The student facing the board must use the dry erase board to draw the word that appears on the screen.

  • The student with his/her back to the board must figure out what the word is!


Volcano


Scientist


Experiment


5 senses


Hypothesis


Observation


Theory


Biology


Cell


Date: August_____ , 2012

The Scientific Method (continued)


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