Chapter 13 leadership and reward structures
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Chapter 13 Leadership and Reward Structures. The Knowledge Management Toolkit Amrit Tiwana. From the CIO to the CKO. CIOs have distinct responsibilities: IT strategy, development of systems, connectivity, IT support, and general IT management.

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Chapter 13 Leadership and Reward Structures

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Chapter 13Leadership and Reward Structures

The Knowledge Management Toolkit

Amrit Tiwana


From the CIO to the CKO

  • CIOs have distinct responsibilities: IT strategy, development of systems, connectivity, IT support, and general IT management.

  • Whether the individual holds the title of Best Practices Manager, CEO, or Strategic Knowledge Manager, the key role that this individual plays is still the same: to make the KM system and processes an integral part of regular, daily work.

  • Although there is often a CIO where there is a CKO, the reverse is not always true.


KM Leadership Roles :

  • Championing:

  • Educating users:

  • Educating the management team:

  • Measuring the impact of KM:

  • Mapping and Defragmenting exiting knowledge:

  • Creating the technology channels:

  • Integrating business process with the technology enablers:


The Knowledge Leader’s job Description

  • Optimizing process design for KM:

  • Creating channels:

  • Integrating KM:

  • Breaking barriers and eliminating impediments:

  • Watching the learning loop:

  • Creating finacial and competitive value:

  • Support IT and eliminating knowledge flow gaps:


The CKO as Organizational Glue

  • Convincing two distinct groups about the value of KM

    • Management

    • Knowledge workers


Initiatives and the CKO

  • The initiatives that a CKO must take fall into four broad categories, as shown in Figure 13-2.

  • The primary task of a CKO is to enable, not control, KM.

  • Management initiatives relating to both tacit and explicit knowledge can be subclassified into two groups of tasks for a CKO: the organizational and the technical responsibilities.

  • On the technological front, a CKO needs to build channels for distribution of explicit knowledge and sharing of tacit knowledge.


Initiatives and the CKO

  • On the organizational front, these tasks include the following.

    • Identifying knowledge gaps:

    • Creating a culture of knowledge sharing:

    • Creating appropriate metrics:

    • Developing communities of practice:

    • Diffusing best practices:

    • Training.

    • Structuring processes.


Initiatives and the CKO

  • Removing knowledge sharing barriers:

  • Aligning local knowledge:

  • Creating process triggers:

    • Why is the customer retention level so low for product X?

    • Why does the customer want to buy a competing product (at a higher price) after having tried ours?

    • Why is the customer not satisfied with our product?

  • Marking KM a part-and-parcel of routine work:


Initiatives and the CKO

  • The technological initiatives that a CKO is responsible for include the following:

    • Building directories:

    • Creating channels:

    • Extending the intranet:

    • Supporting group work:

    • Providing tools for collaborating problem solving:


Initiatives and the CKO

  • The technological initiatives that a CKO is responsible for include the following:

    • Supporting remote work:

    • Building repositories:

    • Infusing external knowledge:

    • Enabling tacit knowledge application:

    • Introducing cross-functional tools:


The Successful Knowledge Leader

  • The CKO must have a fairly good understanding of the technology that will be deployed as a part of the KM system.

  • The CKO also need the skills of an effective manager and an entrepreneur.

  • A CKO needs to understand the working of the company inside out to be able to comprehend its vital process.

  • Create and see the big picture and, at the same time, translate it into tasks and concrete deliverables.


Reward Structures to Ensure KM Success

  • It’s the CKO’s responsibility to motivate employees to use and add value to the KM system and, in turn, the firm.

    • Buckman Labs

    • Chaparral Steel

    • Pfizer

  • The knowledge leader should also consider the relative stability of employees, their jobs, and modes of working.


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