An investigation into the lived experiences of young women who are also mothers
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An Investigation into the Lived Experiences of Young Women who are also Mothers. Barry Fearnley Leeds Metropolitan University [email protected] Qualitative – mixed methods semi-structured interviews a focus group participant observation narrative approach.

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An investigation into the lived experiences of young women who are also mothers

An Investigation into the Lived Experiences of Young Women who are also Mothers

Barry Fearnley

Leeds Metropolitan University

[email protected]


Qualitative – who are also Mothers

mixed methods

semi-structured interviews

a focus group

participant observation

narrative approach



  • Eighteen young women were interviewed agencies)

  • One focus group – 6 young women

  • Attendance at various groups over a four month period

    A total of:

  • 38 – young women who were mothers

  • 12 – expectant young women


‘There is no substitute for intimate engagement with your data. Researchers should think of data as something to cuddle up with, embrace, and get to know better’

(Marshall and Rossman 2011, P. 210)


Four key themes data. Researchers should think of data as something to cuddle up with, embrace, and get to know better’

Relationships

Stigma

Culture factors

Aspirations and change


  • Relationships data. Researchers should think of data as something to cuddle up with, embrace, and get to know better’

  • Sub-themes  

  • Typical day - ‘a day in the life of …’

  • Time with their children

  • Enjoyable experiences of motherhood

  • Sometimes it is hard being a mother

  • Relationship with the child’s father / partner

  • Family support

  • Relationship with friends


  • Relationships data. Researchers should think of data as something to cuddle up with, embrace, and get to know better’

    'watching them sleep, like I know you might think that’s being horrible, but when you see them asleep I can’t believe I’ve made that myself, I can’t believe I’ve brought them up, so that’s the best bit about being a mum yea, watching them grow up and seeing them when they are happy you know, when they’re in their element you know, it’s like I don’t know, I just like to see them happy, it’s a right weird feeling it’s like, it’s like a little butterfly feeling inside’

     Jessica (19 years old)


  • Stigma data. Researchers should think of data as something to cuddle up with, embrace, and get to know better’

    ‘when I got pregnant at sixteen all I got was you’re a slag for

    having a kid at a young age and I was like why am I a slag

    because I was with is his dad for two years’

    Roxie (18 years old)

    ‘there were somebody, same age as me, and she slept with about a

    million times more people than me, I’ve only been with one person

    which is my baby’s dad, and she tried to say that I was a slapper and

    all this and that like I said that’s rich coming from you, you don’t know

    how to pull your knickers up, like people think they can call you a slag

    cos you’ve got a baby but I’ve only been with one person and I’m still

    with him and they’ve been with like one hundred people’

    Mother (16 years old)


  • Culture factors data. Researchers should think of data as something to cuddle up with, embrace, and get to know better’

    ‘I couldn’t live without my [mobile] phone’

    Phoebe (16 years old)

    ‘on a night I bath him, feed him and put him to bed, after that it is my time I usually go on Facebook to talk to my mates’

    Gina (16 years old)

    ‘I used to be on most on all of time but I found it was a waste of time I’m busy with my baby since I have my baby I have no time for Facebook’

    Reeta (19 years old)


  • Aspirations and change data. Researchers should think of data as something to cuddle up with, embrace, and get to know better’

    ‘it changed me for the better, like I got pregnant very young, I was in year 10 just starting doing GCSEs and before that I was not that bothered about school but then because I got pregnant I got like started knuckling down and got really good grades thanks to her, cause if not I wouldn’t have done and not got into college either’  

    Siobhan (17 years old)


Existing research data. Researchers should think of data as something to cuddle up with, embrace, and get to know better’

Current study

Similarities / differences

Next steps


References
References data. Researchers should think of data as something to cuddle up with, embrace, and get to know better’

Attride-Stirling, J. (2001) Thematic network: an

analytic tool for qualitative research, Qualitative

Research, 1(3): 385-405.

Marshall, C. and Rossman, G. B. (2011) Designing

Qualitative Research (Fifth Edition), London: Sage.


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