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Wednesday 19 MAY 2010. Making OBE WORK. Submission supports: Basic Principles and Characteristics of OBE: Clarity of Focus Design Down High Expectations Expanded Opportunities. Due to the structure of the NCS – “not achieved” what was intended.

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slide1
Wednesday 19 MAY 2010

Making

OBE WORK

slide2

Submission supports:

  • Basic Principles and Characteristics of OBE:
  • Clarity of Focus
  • Design Down
  • High Expectations
  • Expanded Opportunities

Due to the structure of the NCS –

“not achieved” what was intended

Focus: Adaptions to the structure and composition of the National Curriculum.

slide3

Principle 2: Design Down

OBE is assessment driven, with standards detailing the expected:

Taught within Context – Transformational OBE

VALUES AND ATTITUDES

SKILLS

KNOWLEDGE

KNOW

CAN DO

BE LIKE

slide4

Current Structure of Assessment Standards

  • Technology – Grade 4 LO 1, AS 2.
  • Deconstruct the following AS (Identify the Knowledge, Skills, and/or Values):
  • Investigates:
  • “Finds out aboutexisting products relevant to a problem, need or opportunity, and identifies the main design aspect (e.g. who it is for, what is it for, what it looks like) that makes them suitable as a solution.”
  • Complex.
  • Integrated statement of K, S and/or V.
  • Very Specific in nature.
  • Requires complex understanding of the English Language
slide5

Nature of the RNCS

  • However, often formulated to only favour either K, S or V.
  • Demonstrates knowledge and understanding of properties of common materials (e.g. wood, food, clay, plastic, paper, fabric) and how these properties influence the effectiveness of products. – KNOWLEDGE-BASED AS
  • Produces simple two-dimensional sketches, enhanced with colour where appropriate. SKILLS-BASED AS
  • Expresses opinions about how technological products make people’s lives easier. VALUES/ATTITUDES-BASED AS
  • Assessment Standards whether knowledge, skills or values-based, lacks :
  • Scope, sequence, progression and pace
slide6

Consequently…….

  • Without scope, sequence, progression and pace teachers:
    • Continue teaching the content which they are used to teach prior to 1998.
    • Teachers then randomly select Assessments to match what they are teaching, often neglecting most of the Assessment Standard.
    • Learners progress with many AS’s not done and not achieving those done, creating an accumulated back lock.
slide7

Curriculum Design should clearly Map out all Grade appropriate K,S and V

Demonstrates knowledge and understanding of the components of simple electrical circuits (connecting wires, battery, switch, output device) and how electrical energy can be converted into other forms (light, heat, sound, movement)

slide8

TEACHER CAN NOW FORMULATES ACTIVITY STATEMENTS FROM THE

CURRICULUM STANDARDS

  • Central and Primary Component of Curriculum
  • Detailed core knowledge,
  • Compiled to detail scope and sequence in which content must be taught.
  • Paces learning.
  • Clearly shows grade progression.

VALUES AND ATTITUDES

SKILLS

KNOWLEDGE

  • Secondary Components of Curriculum
  • Integrated into Knowledge to build competencies and citizens which play a valuable role in building society and preparing learners for the workplace.
slide9

PLANNING……..

RNCS

Learning Programme

Work Schedule

Lesson Plans

  • Phase Plan
  • Grade Progression
  • Grade Plan
  • Scope and sequence
  • Daily Planning
  • Sequence and Pace

Contextual Task and Activity Planning

NC

Details - Grade Progression, scope, sequence and pace

slide10

PLANNING……..

National Curriculum

  • Details Knowledge, skills and values.
  • Ensures scope, sequence and progression is taken care of.
  • Divided into Terms, ensuring correct ‘pace’.
  • Core-knowledge guides teachers into selecting “Context of Learning”.
  • Reduction of Levels of planning from 3 to 1.
  • Uniform interpretation of the Curriculum, standardised content.

Task Planning

  • Paced by the Knowledge Statement for the Term.
  • Teacher develops “Activity Statements” by selecting and relating Knowledge, Skill and Value statements in context.
  • Is still in control of Learning experience.
  • Can be creative in curriculum delivery.
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No curriculum re-write required, just a skilful separation, review and expansion of current core knowledge, skills and values for each Learning Area.

Simplification of the planning process: single level contextual/thematic “Task Planning”.

Simplification of assessment using percentages only:

accurate weighting of formal continuous (skills and values-based) assessments and formal summative (exam type) assessments.

Clear promotion requirements.

No reduction in number of Learning Areas.

Distinguish between Formative Learning Areas and Academic Learning Areas.

Formative/Practical LA’s: Arts and Culture, Life Orientation, Technology – These should only be assessed during the Term.

Academic Subjects LA’s: Languages, Mathematics, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, Economic Management Sciences – Assessed during the Term and Examined (Clear guidance to weighting).

the end

THE END

Thank You

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