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SB 1.4, 1.5, 1.6. ENG IV Card 9/2-9/10. The art of effective communication…. How do writers and artists organize or construct text to convey meaning? Be sure you leave room on the page to come back to and expand your answer at the end of class.

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SB 1.4, 1.5, 1.6

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Sb 1 4 1 5 1 6

SB 1.4, 1.5, 1.6

ENG IV

Card

9/2-9/10


The art of effective communication

The art of effective communication…

  • How do writers and artists organize or construct text to convey meaning?

    • Be sure you leave room on the page to come back to and expand your answer at the end of class.


List the words in the right column in your journal and place a q h or t next to the word

List the words in the right column in your journal and place a Q, H, or T next to the word.

  • (Q): Signals a question- I have never heard of this word before.

  • (H): Signals familiarity- I have heard of the word before and here is the context in which I have heard it.

  • (T): Signals knowledge- I know what this word means, and here is an example.

  • Frame

  • Subject

  • Cropping

  • Lighting

  • Image

  • Composition

  • Space


In your groups

In your groups….

  • Frame

  • Subject

  • Cropping

  • Lighting

  • Image

  • Composition

  • Space

  • Discuss and gain meaning for unfamiliar words.

  • For words you know (marked (T)) write examples and verify your understanding.

  • For words you have heard (marked (H)) use words you know to describe your understanding.


Match the correct word to definition by drawing a line

Match the correct word to definition by drawing a line

  • Frame

  • Subject

  • Cropping

  • Lighting

  • Image

  • Composition

  • Space

  • Likeness of object, person, or scene found and/or arranged in a frame

  • Area established or set apart by the arrangement of subjects or matter

  • Area of action that is captured by the camera

  • The overall effect produced by the amount or type of light in a photograph

  • The way in which the parts of something are arranged to present a visual image

  • object, person, or matter being studied in the frame

  • Cutting off or concealing unwanted parts of an image within a photograph


You should ve gotten something like this

You should’ve gotten something like this…

  • Frame

  • Subject

  • Cropping

  • Lighting

  • Image

  • Composition

  • Space

  • Likeness of object, person, or scene found and/or arranged in a frame

  • Area established or set apart by the arrangement of subjects or matter

  • Area of action that is captured by the camera

  • The overall effect produced by the amount or type of light in a photograph

  • The way in which the parts of something are arranged to present a visual image

  • object, person, or matter being studied in the frame

  • Cutting off or concealing unwanted parts of an image within a photograph


Mise en scene

Mise en scene

  • The composition, or setting, of an image.


Write a brief description of the photo s mise en scene using the language of visual elements

Write a brief description of the photo’s mise en scene using the language of visual elements.


In your journal

In your journal

Sketch this graph 

Each group will be responsible for one portion of OPTIC and we will have a class discussion later.

Be sure you fill in each portion of the chart as we discuss!


Let s go back to the beginning

Let’s go back to the beginning…

… of class anyway!


The art of effective communication1

The art of effective communication…

  • How do writers and artists organize or construct text to convey meaning?

    • Be sure you leave room on the page to come back to and expand your answer at the end of class.

  • Now, return to the question you answered earlier and reevaluate your response. Add any additional thoughts or change your answer completely.

  • Be prepared to share your response!


Sb 1 5 different ways of reading the text

SB 1.5: Different Ways of Reading the Text

Pg. 11


In your journal sb

In your journal & SB…

Silently read Theodore Roethke’s poem multiple times and free write in your journals to generate an initial interpretation of the text.

Mark the text by or to signal words or phrases that support your interpretation.


Prepare to share

Prepare… to share…

  • An oral interpretation of “My Papa’s Waltz” by considering the:

    • Tone

    • Rhythm

    • Inflection

    • Emphasis


Discuss the quote below

Discuss the quote below…

  • “What a poem means is the outcome of a dialogue between the words on the page and the person who happens to be reading it; that is to say, its meaning varies from person to person.”

    • W.H. Auden


Sb 1 6

SB 1.6


Reader response critical theory

Reader Response Critical Theory

  • Now that we’ve discussed W.H. Auden’s quote, let’s look at RRCT.


Reader response critical theory1

Reader Response Critical Theory

  • RRCT asks you to think about your role as a reader whenever you look at a text.

  • It focuses on the relationship among the reader, the reader’s situation, and the text.

  • It suggests that the process of making meaning relies not only on the text itself, but also on the qualities and motivations of the individual who is interacting with the text.


Sketch this in your journal

Sketch this in your journal…


How might these variables affect perception

How might these variables affect perception?

Scenario 1

  • A senior is assigned to read a chapter from the book he is studying in English class. The senior has tickets to see a show that night but knows that there will be a quiz on the chapter the next day. He is a strong reader but has not enjoyed the book the class is studying. What factors are influential on the reader, situation, and text? How would these factors impact the student’s ability to make meaning of that chapter?


What about this one

What about this one?

Scenario 2

  • A senior is part of a group of four students preparing a presentation about optical illusions. She volunteered to do Internet research to find information to bring back to the rest of the group. She is a computer whiz and fascinated by the topic, and spends several hours on the Internet finding examples of optical illusions, but hasn’t done much real reading or investigating of the information about optical illusions. The next day in class the group is expecting some material to read, but the senior brings a collection of optical illusions to show them in stead. How did the reader, situation, and text impact the ability to make meaning?


With a partner

With a partner…

  • Brainstorm other scenarios that show the interdependent relationships among the parts of the diagram.


On the diagram you sketched earlier

On the diagram you sketched earlier…

  • Write important details about each component of RRCT in the box.

  • You will only need to write the parts I underline in the descriptions.


The reader

The Reader

  • One significant factor in RRCT is that it takes into account the person doing the reading. This model takes the reader into account in a number of ways, including:

    • Individuals opinions

    • Attitudes

    • Beliefs

    • Background knowledge

  • Consider some ways in which your personality, attitudes, and personal goals influence you every time you are looking at text.

    • What do you read on your own?

    • Do you read novels, or do you read sports magazines?

    • If you read quite a few novels, then being asked to read 30 pages in a single session might not seem difficult.


The reading situation

The Reading Situation

  • This portion includes the why you are engaged in reading, when you are reading, and where you are reading.

  • Some of these factors are in your control, others are not.

  • Anytime you read a text because someone else told you to read it, the choice has been made for you. How much you are supposed to read is also often decided for you.

  • However, where and when you choose to read the text can be up to you.

    • If you decide to sit in a comfortable stuffed chair at midnight to read your book, you might tend to lose concentration and drift off to sleep.

    • The last few pages you read before falling asleep might be a little less clear than pages you read at your desk earlier that night.


The text

The Text

  • The text is whatever is being read.

  • Textual features vary, depending on the source.

    • A textbook will present text differently that a magazine or a pamphlet.

    • Numerous other factors influence the text, from level of difficulty to the typefaces ad illustrations.


Sb 1 4 1 5 1 6

1.7


Skim your poem and mark the text using

Skim your poem and mark the text using:

  • (*) to make a comment (what intrigues or bores you)

  • Underline areas to show like/dislike

  • (?) to signal confusion or question an idea

  • (!) to make a connection


In your book

In your book-

  • Annotate the poem based on:

    • The Reader: your experiences, attitudes, values with poetry, with the narrative of the poem, with the author.

    • The Text: consider the fact that it is poetry, the format and structure of the text, the way it is lined out, and the typology of the author.

    • The Reading Situation: Is a given as it is a class reading.


Tpcastt

TPCASTT

Use the TPCASTT strategy in your journal to further develop meaning for your poem.


In your groups1

In your groups-

  • Read the poem together.

  • Come to a consensus as to the meaning of the poem.

  • Reading Situation has now changed since you are moving from an individual to group context. Now you will have to take into consideration the views of others.


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