slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Mississippi Association of Community and Junior Colleges FY 2014 Legislative Recommendations

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 28

Mississippi Association of Community and Junior Colleges FY 2014 Legislative Recommendations - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 117 Views
  • Uploaded on

Mississippi Association of Community and Junior Colleges FY 2014 Legislative Recommendations. Dr. Clyde Muse MACJC Legislative Committee Chair. MACJC. MISSION. DEVELOPING HUMAN CAPITAL.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Mississippi Association of Community and Junior Colleges FY 2014 Legislative Recommendations' - hada


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2

Mississippi Association of Community and Junior Colleges

FY 2014 Legislative Recommendations

Dr. Clyde Muse

MACJC Legislative Committee Chair

slide3

MACJC

MISSION

DEVELOPING HUMAN CAPITAL

Our mission is to empower Mississippians to realize their full potential through world-class education and training which results in an enhanced quality of life for individuals, communities and the state.

slide4

Community

Colleges

MISSION

DEVELOPING HUMAN CAPITAL

…are strategically accessible, flexible and proven capable of meeting Mississippi’s need for a more educated and highly skilled workforce.

slide5

Community

Colleges

Mississippi’s current and future

workforce will drive the economy.

YUP

Prepare people for JOBS

About 275,000 Mississippians are in

low-skill, low wage employment, working

full-time and not earning enough to keep a family of four out of poverty.

slide6

TODAY’S WORKERS

MIDDLE-SKILL JOBS

Middle-skill jobs make up roughly half of all employment today.

  • WELDING
  • TRUCK DRIVING
  • HEALTHCARE
  • INFORMATION
  • TECHNOLOGY
slide7

ENROLLMENT

2011-2012

80,285

84,502

18,794

ADULT BASIC EDUCATION / GED

COLLEGE STUDENTS

WORKFORCE TRAINEES

From fall 2007 to fall 2011, community college credit enrollment increased by nearly 20 percent. 67,719 80,285

Headcount Enrollment, Fall 2011 Only

slide8

STUDENT

PROFILE

ENROLLMENT

  • 18.3 Avg. ACT
  • 25 Avg. Age
  • 74% Full-time
  • 26% Part-time
  • 74% Academic Transfer
  • 26% Career/Technical
  • 63% Female
  • 37% Male
  • 97% Mississippi Residents
  • 14,271 Degrees in 2012
slide9

2011-2012

Most MS Students Start at

Community Colleges.

68%

56%

50%

OF ALL STUDENTS TAKING CREDIT COURSES

OF ALL FRESHMEN

OF ALL UNDERGRADUATES

In 2011, 60 percent of Mississippi’s university graduates had previously attended a Mississippi community college. Mississippi ranked 6th in the nation for the number of bachelor’s degree completers who had previously enrolled at a

two-year college.

Source: National Student Clearing House

slide10

COMPARE

2012-2013

Average Annual Tuition and Fees

Tuition covers about

one-third of the

cost to educate a

student at a

community college.

slide11

BEST

VALUE

COMPARE

ENROLLMENT AND TUITION

Community College Freshmen and Sophomores vs. all Undergraduates at

4-Year Institutions.

slide12

PRIORITY

ONE

MID-LEVEL FUNDING

TABLES

Passed by the Mississippi Legislature in 2007

An additional $2,495

per student is needed

to achieve Mid-Level

Funding.

slide13

PRIORITY

ONE

FACULTY SALARIES

TABLES

MID-LEVEL FUNDING IS THE MEANS TO EQUITABLE SALARIES

  • The difference between CJC average salary and mid-point faculty salary is $2,453.
  • Approximately one-third of new
  • Mid-Level Funding dollars will be
  • directed to CJC salaries.
slide14

PRIORITY

ONE

MORE

MID-LEVEL FUNDING

TEXT

State support plummeted, while enrollment soared.

FY 2013

FY 2000

  • FY 2000 State Support = 55.2%
  • FY 2013 State Support = 39.4%
  • FY 2000 Tuition Revenue = 18%
  • FY 2013 Tuition Revenue = 34.2%
slide15

FY 2013

DISTRIBUTION OF

EDUCATIONAL FUNDING

GENERAL FUND

for EDUCATION

Community Colleges

receive only 7 cents of

each dollar the state

spends on Education.

slide16

Recession

Proof

COMPARE

STUDENT GROWTH VS. STATE FUNDING

FY 2000 THROUGH FY 2013*

Workers who lost

jobs in the Recession

turned to community

colleges for a rapid

retool of skills.

*projected

slide17

REASONS

MID-LEVEL FUNDING

  • 1
  • ACCESS
  • AFFORDABLE
  • TUITION
  • 2
  • COMPETITIVE
  • FACULTY
  • SALARIES
  • 3
  • UNDER-
  • PREPARED
  • STUDENTS
  • 4
  • MORE
  • COLLEGE
  • GRADUATES
  • 5
  • JOBS
slide18

LOSING

GROUND

MID-LEVEL FUNDING

Cuts in state funding,

coupled with significant

enrollment increases,

stalled progress

toward Mid-Level

Funding.

Peak

slide19

PRIORITY

TWO

Capital Improvements $170,916,570

  • With undergraduate enrollment far exceeding the universities, the community colleges should receive a more equitable share of bond funds.
  • The community colleges typically receive about 22 percent of the bond funds designated for higher education, while the universities receive the lion’s share of bonds each year.
  • A more equitable percentage would be between 30 and 40 percent of the higher education bonds each year.
  • Funds will be distributed: one-half evenly among the 15 colleges and the other half based on enrollment.
slide20

PRIORITY

TWO

Capital Improvements $170,916,570

  • $131,916,570

Construction, repair and renovation, infrastructure upgrades

  • $30,000,000

In 1995, the Legislature provided a $29.5 million bond for community colleges and the Library Commission for a telecommunications network. That debt has been paid. The colleges need a new General Obligation Bond to meet the escalating demand for e-learning and e-commerce in all facets of college operations

slide21

State Headquarters BuildingCapital Improvements

  • $9,000,000 separate request
  • The Legislature has given MCCB the land, and the planning is done. It is time to build a headquarters for the oldest community college system in the nation.
slide22

PRIORITY

THREE

DROPOUT RECOVERY14,000 students leave the K-12 system each year

TABLES

  • $9,401,00
  • Provide the same level of state support per ABE/GED student as a student enrolled in regular college-level programs
  • 3,500 dropouts served at FTE value of $2,686
  • Short-term skills training and wrap-around services such as transportation, child care and legal aid
slide23

PRIORITY

THREE

DROPOUT RECOVERYThe path to a GED is getting more expensive and difficult.

TABLES

  • In 2009, the Legislature appropriated $100,000 to each community college for Dropout Recovery. That amount has not increased.
  • New federal financial aid regulations require a high school diploma or GED for Pell Grant eligibility for one-year Certificate training programs such as welding.
  • In January 2014, the cost of the GED test will increase to $120 and the test will be administered only on a computer.
  • Also, scores earned by test takers from 2002 through 2013 will no longer be valid. People who have not earned the GED by Dec. 31, 2013 will be required to take the entire new test beginning Jan. 1, 2014.
slide24

PILOT

PHASE

Mississippi WORKS

Another approach to Dropout Recovery

Co-Lin, Hinds, Itawamba, Gulf Coast and Pearl River projects are underway.

  • INNOVATIVE
  • COLLABORATIVE
  • STUDENTS FIRST
  • GRADUATES
slide25

Committed

to…

PERFORMANCE & ACCOUNTABILITY

TABLES

  • Community colleges have responded to the Education Achievement Council’s charge and developed a statewide system of metrics for performance and accountability.
  • The National Strategic Planning and Analysis Research Center (nSPARC) at MSU has field tested the metrics in collaboration with the 15 community colleges.
  • The colleges stand ready to implement these performance and accountability measures and request that the Legislature consider funds in addition to the regular appropriation to pilot this type of funding method in FY 2014.
slide26

ONE

VOICE

FY 2014 MACJC Legislative

Recommendations Endorsed by

  • Mississippi Community College Board
  • Mississippi Community and Junior College Trustees Association
  • Mississippi Community and Junior College Inter-Alumni Association
  • Mississippi Faculty Association for Community and Junior Colleges
  • Community College Student VOICES Organization
ad