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Chapter 5 motivation and emotion driving consumer behavior l.jpg

Chapter 5Motivation and Emotion:Driving Consumer Behavior

BABIN / HARRIS

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Motivations l.jpg

Motivations

LO1

  • The inner reasons or driving forces behind human action as consumers are driven to address real needs.

  • Human motivations are oriented toward two key groups of behavior:

    • Homeostasis – the body naturally reacts in a way so as to maintain a constant, normal blood stream.

    • Self-improvement – changing one’s current state to a level that is more ideal.

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Exhibit 5 1 an illustration of consumer motivations according to maslow s hierarchy l.jpg

Exhibit 5.1: An Illustration of Consumer Motivations According to Maslow’s Hierarchy

LO2

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Exhibit 5 2 utilitarian and hedonic motivations lead to consumer behaviors l.jpg

Exhibit 5.2: Utilitarian and Hedonic Motivations Lead to Consumer Behaviors

LO2

Eating Lunch

Driving

Shopping

Air Freshener

Gift Giving

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


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  • Melanie exercises almost every day. She is motivated by changing her current state of fitness to a level that is more ideal. Which group of motivation behavior does this describe?

    • A. self-improvement

    • B. homeostasis

    • C. self-actualization

    • D. hierarchy of effects

    • E. esteem

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


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Harriet and her daughter go shopping just for the fun of it. They are not necessarily looking for a specific product, they just like being together looking at the products. Which motivation does this illustrate?

a. physiological

b. utilitarian

c. hedonic

d. end-state

e. esteem

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Consumer involvement l.jpg

Represents the degree of personal relevance a consumer finds in pursuing value from a given consumption act.

Types:

Product

Shopping

Situational

Enduring

Emotional

Consumer Involvement

LO2

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Exhibit 5 3 typical high and low product involvement l.jpg

Exhibit 5.3: Typical High and Low Product Involvement

LO2

  • Some product categories have more personal relevance

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Slide9 l.jpg

_____ represents the personal relevance of shopping activities.

a. Shopping involvement

b. Shopping endurance

c. Product involvement

d. Emotional involvement

e. Shopping enthusiasm

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Situational involvement l.jpg

Situational Involvement

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Enduring involvement l.jpg

Enduring Involvement

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Emotions l.jpg

Emotions

LO3

  • Psychobiological reactions to appraisals.

    • Psychobiological because they involve psychological processing and physical responses.

    • Create visceral responses – certain feeling states are tied to behavior in a very direct way.

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


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Cognitive Appraisal Theory

LO3

  • Describes how specific types of thoughts can serve as a basis for specific emotions.

  • Cognitive appraisals:

    • Anticipation—future; hope, anxiety

    • Agency—responsibility; frustration

    • Equity—fairness; warmth, anger

    • Outcomes—how it turned out; joy, pride

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Exhibit 5 4 visceral responses to emotions by consumers l.jpg

Exhibit 5.4: Visceral Responses to Emotions by Consumers

LO3

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


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Emotion Terminology

LO3

  • Mood – a transient (temporary and changing) and general affective state.

    • Mood-congruent judgments – the value of a target is influenced in a consistent way by one’s mood.

  • Affect – represents the feelings a consumer has about a particular product or activity.

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Measuring emotion l.jpg

Measuring Emotion

LO4

Autonomic measures

Self-report measures

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Exhibit 5 6 a short form panas application l.jpg

Exhibit 5.6: A Short-Form PANAS Application

LO4

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Emotional involvement l.jpg

Emotional Involvement

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Involvement l.jpg

Involvement

Is this high involvement or irrational behavior?

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


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Keely was so engrossed in her book that she didn’t realize that five hours had passed. What term is used to represent Keely’s high emotional involvement in which she is engrossed in reading the book?

a. emotional involvement

b. flow

c. bipolar

d. emotional contagion

e. emotional labor

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Emotional expressiveness l.jpg

Emotional Expressiveness

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Emotional intelligence l.jpg

Emotional Intelligence

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Emotions23 l.jpg

Emotions

What is this consumer feeling?

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Exhibit 5 8 illustration of emotion aiding learning l.jpg

Exhibit 5.8: Illustration of Emotion Aiding Learning

LO6

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


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Nostalgia

Going retro - Nostalgia creates positive feelings.

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


To know it really is to feel it l.jpg

To Know It Really Is To Feel It!

Translating words into another language does not always translate emotions.

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


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Which of the following describes the situation in which consumers remember information better when the mood they are currently in matches the mood they were in when originally exposed to the information?a. autobiographical memoryb. nostalgiac. emotional contagiond. emotional expressivenesse. mood-congruent recall

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Schema based affect l.jpg

Schema-Based Affect

LO6

Emotions become stored as part of the meaning for a category.

We may want to capitalize on the positive and redirect the negative.

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Schema based affect29 l.jpg

Schema Based Affect

Emotional effect on memory—superior recall for information presented with mild emotional content.

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Exhibit 5 9 a typical car salesperson schema l.jpg

Exhibit 5.9: A Typical Car Salesperson Schema

LO6

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Exhibit 5 10 examples of schema based affect l.jpg

Exhibit 5.10: Examples of Schema-Based Affect

LO6

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


Emotional contagion l.jpg

Emotional Contagion

LO6

  • Represents the extent to which an emotional display by one person influences the emotional state of a bystander.

  • Emotional labor – workers have to overtly manage their own emotional displays as part of the requirements of the job.

© 2009 South-Western, a division of Cengage Learning.


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