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US History. Unit 4 Week 1. Homework for the week. Monday Pick a topic for the 1920s essay outline Read and Cornell Notes on p. 338-341 (26.5, 26.6) Tuesday Read 26.1 and the first paragraph of each section and then write a summary about Sacco and Vanzetti and their trial .

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Us history

US History

Unit 4 Week 1


Homework for the week

Homework for the week

  • Monday

    • Pick a topic for the 1920s essay outline

    • Read and Cornell Notes on p. 338-341 (26.5, 26.6)

  • Tuesday

    • Read 26.1 and the first paragraph of each section and then write a summary about Sacco and Vanzetti and their trial.

    • Study vocab for card quiz

  • Block Day

    • Cornell Notes from 1st source for 1920s project

    • Prep for Monday’s Sacco and Vanzetti Hearing by doing outside research

  • Friday

    • Work on essay outline. Rough draft due on Tuesday, Nov. 12th.


Agenda monday 11 4 12

Agenda: Monday 11/4/12

  • HOT ROC: Essay outline sample

  • New essay outline assignment for the 1920s

  • Image analysis

  • Cause and Effect Jigsaw

  • Report Out

  • Homework:

    • Pick a topic for the 1920s essay outline

    • Read and Cornell Notes on p. 338-341 (26.5, 26.6)


Model essay outline

Model Essay Outline

  • Here is a sample of an Advanced Essay Outline for the Unit 2 prompt: Discusswhat opportunities and conflicts emerged as Americans moved westward.

  • I. Introduction

  • Context: At the start of the nineteenth century, Americans sought to expand westward into and beyond the Oklahoma territory. Civilization spread rapidly into this area, driven by railroads that led farther and farther west.

  • Thesis: The westward expansion by American settlers was a challenging process that involved months of hard travel and living with much risk to pioneers. Despite the hardship, marginalized groups found opportunities to establish themselves in communities free from oppression, far from the center of civilization. Impoverished farmers, ranchers and miners found land and work in newly established towns, or established towns themselves. Expansion did, however, meet with resistance from Native Americans, whose territory was taken by those who claimed it as their own.


Claims

Claims

  • Westward expansion was driven by a desire for prosperity and an attraction for the opportunities of the new territories.

  • The ideals of liberty and equality drove settlers to migrate into uncivilized western territories and begin new lives.

  • Native Americans and their culture were irreparably harmed by the westward expansion of American settlers.


Evidence and commentary

Evidence and Commentary

  • A. The discovery of gold in California attracted around 290,000 immigrants within the span of just two years, from 1848 to 1850.

  • Hart, Diane, Bert Bower, and Jim Lobdell. "Chapter 12: Change and Conflict in the American West." History Alive! :. Palo Alto, CA: Teachers' Curriculum Institute, 2002. 15161. Print.

  • B. The discrepancy in cattle prices between the east and west—5 dollars a head as compared to 40 dollars a head, respectively—caused many ranchers to undertake the difficult task of driving cattle across the plains to ship them eastward to more lucrative markets.

  • Hart, Diane, Bert Bower, and Jim Lobdell. "Chapter 12: Change and Conflict in the American West." History Alive! :. Palo Alto, CA: Teachers' Curriculum Institute, 2002. 15161. Print.

  • Commentary: To citizens living the the west, the fortune available in the new territories was a clear incentive to migrate west. Millions of people took the risk of moving west for the chance that they may earn their fortunes in any of several potentially lucrative trades and industries that were created in the new territories and the people that moved their, following the hope for profit in the frontier.


Evidence and commentary1

Evidence and Commentary

  • A. From 1865 to the turn of the century, hunting by settlers reduced the buffalo population from around twelve million to just above fifty head, thereby decimating the resource that thirty one great plains tribes depended upon for food, shelter and clothing.

  • Carnes, Jim, Harry A. Blackmun, and Herbert Tauss. "Ghost Dance at Wounded Knee."Usand Them: A History of Intolerance in America. New York: Oxford UP, 1996. N. pag. Print.

  • B. Much of the remaining Sioux nation in 1890, some 290 people, were killed by government troops because of their efforts to first maintain their way of life, then resist the actions of settlers and the government that were taking their livelihoods. Those few that remained were forced onto reservations that shrank.

  • Carnes, Jim, Harry A. Blackmun, and Herbert Tauss. "Ghost Dance at Wounded Knee."Usand Them: A History of Intolerance in America. New York: Oxford UP, 1996. N. pag. Print.

  • Commentary: The hunting of buffalo to support westward expansion of settlers consumed the resource that great plains tribes relied upon for their way of life. This resource, once reduced to the scarcity it reached, could no longer support the Native Americans , forcing them to change their lives just to survive. A central part of their culture was destroyed by direct actions of settlers, and this resource could not be replaced.


1920s essay outline

1920s Essay Outline

  • Pick a topic

  • Improve on an area of weakness in your last essay

  • Key Dates: Rough draft due 11/12 Final draft due 11/26


Hot roc what do these two images tell you about the beginning of the 1920s

HOT ROC: What do these two images tell you about the beginning of the 1920s?


Cause effect jigsaw

Cause & Effect Jigsaw

Effects

Cause

Pick one section and have your partner complete the other section. Come up with 5 Cause and Effect statements for your assigned section:

  • 26.3 Rising Labor Tensions

  • 26.4 Growing Political Tensions


Jigsaw report out

Jigsaw report out

  • Partners share out their sections

  • Take notes on other sections

  • Discuss as a class


Agenda tuesday 11 5 2013

Agenda, Tuesday, 11/5/2013

  • HOT ROC: What are 2 cause and effects that you encountered in last night’s homework?

  • Computer lab time to research and find sources for your paper topic.

    HW: Read 26.1 and the first paragraph of each section and then write a summary about Sacco and Vanzetti and their trial.

    Study vocab for card quiz


Agenda block day 10 31 11 1

Agenda: Block Day 10/31 & 11/1

  • Add vocab:

    • Quota system (p.338)

    • Secular (p.341)

  • Vocab card quiz

  • Sacco and Vanzetti Trial

  • HW: Research 1920s project and take notes from your 1st source and study vocab for Friday’s vocab card quiz


Sacco vanzetti trial

Sacco & Vanzetti Trial

Overview


Background

Background

  • At 3:00 P.M. on April 15,1920, a paymaster and his guard were carrying a factory payroll of $15,776 through the main street of South Braintree, Massachusetts, a small industrial town south of Boston.

  • Two men standing by a fence suddenly pulled out guns and fired on them. The gunmen snatched up the cash boxes dropped by the mortally wounded pair and jumped into a waiting automobile. The bandit gang, numbering four or five in all, sped away, eluding their pursuers.

  • At first this brutal murder and robbery, not uncommon in post-World War I America, aroused only local interest.


Background1

Three weeks later, on the evening of May 5, 1920, two Italians, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, fell into a police trap that had been set for a suspect in the Braintree crime.

Although originally not under suspicion, both men were carrying guns at the time of their arrest and when questioned by the authorities they lied. As a result they were held and eventually indicted for the South Braintree crimes.

Vanzetti was also charged with an earlier holdup attempt that had taken place on December 24, 1919, in the nearby town of Bridgewater.

Background


Background2

Background

  • After a hard-fought trial of six weeks, during which the themes of patriotism and radicalism were often sharply contrasted by the prosecution and the defense, the jury found Sacco and Vanzetti guilty of robbery and murder on July 14,1921.

  • This verdict marked, however, only the beginning of a lengthy legal struggle to save the two men. It extended until 1927, during which time the defense made many separate motions, appeals, and petitions to both state and federal courts in an attempt to gain a new trial.


Clemency hearing

Clemency Hearing

  • Overview:

    • The governor of Massachusetts has summoned you to testify in a clemency hearing for two convicted death row murderers. Governors convene these hearings when they are considering granting clemency, a pardon or lessening of a penalty.

  • Objective:

    • Should Sacco and Vanzetti receive clemency?

  • Directions:

    • Each student will be assigned to a pair/group to play a role. You are to prepare for the trial according to the instructions provided. Remember you want to be able to both defend your position and attack and undermine those who oppose you using evidence from the book and any other sources you would like.


Clemency hearing1

Clemency Hearing

  • Each group will have someone present a brief (1 minute) opening statement that explains who you are and you will share how you feel regarding the clemency of Sacco and Vanzetti.

  • When everyone has spoken there will be time for a brief debate of ideas and for the Lowell Committee to ask questions to each of the groups.

    • If time allows, groups may also question each other.

  • The jury may also ask questions of Sacco and Vanzetti.

    • If time allows, groups may also question Sacco and Vanzetti

  • Sacco and Vanzetti will give their closing statements at the end.

  • After the presentation of statements and questions, the Lowell Committee will deliberate a verdict. The deliberations will be open and take place in front of the class, as a fish bowl. Each member of the Committee is required to present an argument during deliberations. Then a vote will be taken and a verdict reached.

  • After the verdict has been reached, Governor Fuller will choose to either support the Lowell Committee’s decision or overrule it and make his own decision.


Roles overview

  • Use the information packet to prepare for the clemency hearing.

    • Tasks:

      • Read about your group

      • Answer questions for your group

      • Prepare statements for the hearing

    • Monday

      • Clemency Hearing

      • Starts at the beginning of class, no work time.

Roles & Overview


Roles overview1

  • Use the information packet to prepare for the clemency hearing.

  • Schedule

    • Block Day

      • Work on gathering background information on the trial. Read background information and take Cornell notes on the Sacco and Vanzetti case 26.1-26.5 only intro paragraphs in each section.

      • Homework: Do more research on the trial at home. Bring research to class on Friday.

    • Friday

      • In class work day

      • Homework: Finish up research and opening statements

    • Monday

      • Clemency Hearing

      • Starts at the beginning of class, no work time.

Roles & Overview:


Roles overview2

  • Use the information packet to prepare for the clemency hearing.

  • Schedule

    • Block Day

      • Work on gathering background information on the trial. Read background information and take Cornell notes on the Sacco and Vanzetti case 26.1-26.5 only intro paragraphs in each section.

      • Homework: Do more research on the trial at home. Bring research to class on Friday.

    • Friday

      • In class work day

      • Homework: Finish up research and opening statements

    • Monday

      • Clemency Hearing

      • Starts at the beginning of class, no work time.

Roles & Overview:


Agenda wed thurs 11 6 7

Agenda: Wed-Thurs 11/6-7

  • HOT ROC: Vocab Quiz

  • Work day for Monday’s Hearing


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