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WORKPLACE VIOLENCE HOW TO KEEP YOUR EMPLOYEES AND CUSTOMERS SAFE. CHANDLER POLICE DEPARTMENT Lt. Mike Kelly Sgt. Pat McDonnell Officer Velma Anderjeski “Serving with Courage, Pride and Dedication”. PURPOSE.

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Workplace violence how to keep your employees and customers safe

WORKPLACE VIOLENCEHOW TO KEEP YOUR EMPLOYEES AND CUSTOMERS SAFE

CHANDLER POLICE DEPARTMENT

Lt. Mike Kelly

Sgt. Pat McDonnell

Officer Velma Anderjeski

“Serving with Courage, Pride and Dedication”


Purpose
PURPOSE

  • To introduce members of the business community to the reality of workplace violence by providing:

    • background information

    • statistics

    • prevention/recognition information

    • guidelines for handling a critical incident


Objectives
OBJECTIVES

  • Inform the business community of the risks associated with workplace violence

  • Provide tips on recognizing and evaluating risks

  • Provide tools for businesses to manage situations once they occur

  • Coordinate business/emergency responder plans for handling incidents


Why set up a program
WHY SET UP A PROGRAM?

  • OSHA General Duty Clause 5a of 19 USC 654

  • Each Employer shall:

    • Furnish to each of his employees, employment and place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing, or likely to cause, death or serious physical harm to its employees.


Your legal responsibility
Your Legal Responsibility

  • Foreseeability

  • Duty to warn


Additional reasons
ADDITIONAL REASONS

  • High cost of just one incident

  • Threats and other violent, abusive behaviors are no longer being tolerated in the workplace

  • Executives, professionals, and administrative personnel are no longer immune to acts of violence in the workplace


Additional reasons1
ADDITIONAL REASONS

  • Layoffs, increased workload, having to do more with less, and other unpopular changes in the work environment have been associated with increased risk for violence

  • Recent reports and surveys suggest that workplace violence impacts large numbers of employers and employees


And finally
AND FINALLY

  • It’s the right thing to do. Employers have both a moral and a legal obligation to provide a safe workplace for their employees, clients and visitors.


Case study 1
CASE STUDY #1

  • VIOLENCE CATCHES A COMPANY UNPREPARED


Legal issues you may face
LEGAL ISSUES YOU MAY FACE

  • Third Parties may sue for:

    • negligent hiring

    • negligent retention

    • negligent supervision

    • negligent training


Legal issues
LEGAL ISSUES

  • Additional considerations - the employee who is the subject of an investigation may sue for:

    • wrongful discharge

    • defamation/slander

    • invasion of privacy

    • ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) issues


What the police department is doing
WHAT THE POLICE DEPARTMENT IS DOING

  • Promoting community awareness of issues

  • Internal program construction

  • Market the program to local businesses


Our plan response
OUR PLAN/RESPONSE

  • Implement strategies to:

    • Prevent workplace violence incidents

    • Respond to incidents when they occur

    • Help businesses manage incidents

    • Provide a tactical response when necessary


Our plan response1
OUR PLAN/RESPONSE

  • Before an incident occurs:

    • Provide training for businesses

    • Provide training for emergency response personnel

    • Prepare operational response plans


Workplace violence
WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

  • In the United States, each week an average of 25 workers are murdered while at work or on duty

  • An average of 18,000 workers are assaulted

  • Homicide is the #1 cause of occupational injury death among women, #2 among men

  • Firearms are used over 80% of the time


Workplace violence1
WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

  • Workplace violence is clustered in certain occupational settings;

    • Retail trade & service industries account for more than half of workplace homicides & 85% of nonfatal workplace assaults.

    • Taxicab drivers are the #1 victims of homicide while on duty.


Workplace violence2
WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

  • Workers in healthcare, community services, and retail settings are at risk for non-fatal assaults.



Workplace violence defined
WORKPLACE VIOLENCE DEFINED

  • An intentional act committed by an individual or a group for the purpose of (or results in) psychologically or physically affecting an organization or persons associated with an organization.


Examples of workplace violence

Domestic violence related incidents

Harassment

Intimidation

Stalking

Threats

Flat tires

Sabotage

Vandalism

Theft

Assault

Extortion

EXAMPLES OF WORKPLACE VIOLENCE


Early warning signs
EARLY WARNING SIGNS

  • THE BIG THREE:

    • Threats

    • Intimidation

    • Weapons


Early warning behaviors
EARLY WARNING BEHAVIORS

  • Threats

    • Direct

    • Indirect

    • Veiled

    • Conditional


Early warning behaviors1
EARLY WARNING BEHAVIORS

  • Intimidation

    • Glaring/staring

    • Looming over

    • Intimidating physical gestures


Early warning behaviors2
EARLY WARNING BEHAVIORS

  • Weapons

    • Fascination with weapons

    • Carrying weapons at work

    • Inappropriate comments about weapons


Other warning signs
OTHER WARNING SIGNS

  • Work history

  • Personal History


Early warning indicators

Excessive tardiness or absences

Increased need for supervision

Reduced Productivity

Inconsistency

Strained workplace relationships

Inability to concentrate

Violation of safety procedures

Changes in health or hygiene

Unusual behavior

Substance Abuse

EARLY WARNING INDICATORS


Early warning indicators1
EARLY WARNING INDICATORS

  • Excuses or blaming

  • Depression


Who commits these acts
WHO COMMITS THESE ACTS?

  • Someone you or a fellow employee knows;

    • Ex-husbands/wives of employees

    • Ex-boyfriends/girlfriends of employees


Who commits these acts1
WHO COMMITS THESE ACTS?

  • Someone you work with;

    • Disgruntled employees

    • Ex-employees

    • Disgruntled customers/clients


What can you do

Limit public access to work areas

Keep employee entrances locked

Set up safe rooms

Set up a safety committee

Change locks or codes regularly

Security/staff notification of court orders

Devise a code system

Write 911, address & location in building/area on phones

Set up a security system

WHAT CAN YOU DO?


What can your company do
WHAT CAN YOUR COMPANY DO?

  • Use a job application form that includes an appropriate waiver and release.

  • Evaluate the need for screening contract personnel who work at your facility.

  • Recommend to legislative bodies that access to conviction records in all states be made available to businesses when conducting their background investigation process


What can your company do1
WHAT CAN YOUR COMPANY DO?

  • Form in-house threat-assessment teams

  • Be ready ahead of time - PLAN!

  • Have post-trauma counseling available


Community resources
COMMUNITY RESOURCES

  • Invite local police into your firm to promote good relations and to help them become more familiar with your facility.

  • Use law enforcement and security experts to educate employees on how to prevent violence in the workplace.

  • Utilize local associations & community organizations as a resource.


Institute review security procedures
INSTITUTE & REVIEW SECURITY PROCEDURES

  • Conduct security surveys at scheduled intervals to help determine whether modifications should be made.

    • Improved lighting in and around the place of work (including parking lots);

    • Arranging escorts for employees who are concerned about walking to and from the parking lot;


Institute and review security procedures
INSTITUTE AND REVIEW SECURITY PROCEDURES

  • Having reception areas that can be locked to prevent outsiders from going into the offices when no receptionist is on duty; and

  • When appropriate, having more than one employee on the premises.


Institute and review security procedures1
INSTITUTE AND REVIEW SECURITY PROCEDURES

  • Use, maintain, and regularly review appropriate physical security measures, such as electronic access control systems, silent alarms, metal detectors, and video cameras in a manner consistent with applicable state and federal laws.


Institute and review security procedures2
INSTITUTE AND REVIEW SECURITY PROCEDURES

  • Limit former employees’ access to the workplace as appropriate.

  • Develop policies regarding visitor access within facilities.


Communication
COMMUNICATION

  • Improve internal/external communications - employees should have a means to alert others in the workplace to a dangerous situation and to provide information requested by emergency responders.

    • CASE STUDY #2


Communications
COMMUNICATIONS

  • If appropriate, establish an internal emergency code word or phone number similar to 911.

  • Place lists of contact persons, crisis management plans, evacuation plans, and building plans where they can be made available to emergency responders (at offsite locations).


Rules
RULES

  • Establish ground rules for behavior - Organizations that do not tolerate drug abuse or aggressive interaction lower the risk of workplace violence.


Training
TRAINING

  • Employee & Manager training - In order for policies and procedures concerning workplace violence to be effective, they must be implemented in conjunction with appropriate employee training.


Prevention programs
PREVENTION PROGRAMS

  • Companies need to have programs in place to assist troubled employees and to address managerial concerns before violence or threats arise.


Reporting procedures
REPORTING PROCEDURES

  • All employees should know how and where to report violent acts or threats of violence.

  • Establish a policy to assure that reports which are submitted from outside the company, concerning potentially violent people who are likely to be present at your worksite are routed to the appropriate manager and then investigated.


Threat management plan
THREAT MANAGEMENT PLAN

  • It is important to prepare a threat management plan so that when a threat occurs everyone will know that there is a policy and will understand what to do. The plan might include:


Threat management plan1
THREAT MANAGEMENT PLAN

  • Designating a threat management team;

  • Providing guidance concerning liaison with outside assistance;

  • Providing guidance developed in concert with local authorities for collecting and preserving evidence, including interviews of involved parties;


Threat management plan2
THREAT MANAGEMENT PLAN

  • Managing of communications regarding the incident, for example, media relations, internal communications, and possible use of a rumor control desk;

  • Managing the release of sensitive information where appropriate;

  • Assigning responsibilities for contacting the families of victims;


Threat management plan3
THREAT MANAGEMENT PLAN

  • Managing clean-up and repairs;

  • Making decisions about returning to work;

  • Notifying customers and suppliers about changes in orders;

  • Providing employees and their families with information about their benefits; and

  • Managing operations and trauma care after the crisis.



Addressing violent or threatening incidents
ADDRESSING VIOLENT OR THREATENING INCIDENTS

  • Use all available resources

  • Evaluate security after a threat


Personal conduct to minimize violence
PERSONAL CONDUCT TO MINIMIZE VIOLENCE

  • DO

    • Project calmness: move and speak slowly, quietly and confidently.

    • Be an empathetic listener: encourage the person to talk and listen patiently.

    • Focus your attention on the other person to let them know you are interested in what they have to say.


Personal conduct to minimize violence1
PERSONAL CONDUCT TO MINIMIZE VIOLENCE

  • Maintain a relaxed yet attentive posture and position yourself at a right angle rather than directly in front of the other person.

  • Acknowledge the person’s feelings. Indicate that you can see he or she is upset.

  • Ask for small, specific favors such as asking the person to move to a quieter area.


Personal conduct to minimize violence2
PERSONAL CONDUCT TO MINIMIZE VIOLENCE

  • Establish ground rules if unreasonable behavior persists. Calmly describe the consequences of any violent behavior.

  • Use delaying tactics which will give the person time to calm down. For example, offer a drink of water (in a disposable cup).

  • Be reassuring and point out choices. Break big problems into smaller, more manageable problems.


Personal conduct to minimize violence3
PERSONAL CONDUCT TO MINIMIZE VIOLENCE

  • Accept criticism in a positive way. When the complaint might be true, use statements like “You’re probably right” or “It was my fault.” If the criticism seems unwarranted, ask clarifying questions.

  • Ask for his/her recommendations. Repeat back to him/her what you feel he/she is requesting of you.


Personal conduct to minimize violence4
PERSONAL CONDUCT TO MINIMIZE VIOLENCE

  • Arrange yourself so that a visitor cannot block your access to an exit.


Personal conduct to minimize violence5
PERSONAL CONDUCT TO MINIMIZE VIOLENCE

  • DON’T

    • Use styles of communication which generate hostility such as apathy, brush off, coldness, condescension, robotism, going strictly by the rules or giving the runaround.

    • Reject all of a client’s demands from the start.


Personal conduct to minimize violence6
PERSONAL CONDUCT TO MINIMIZE VIOLENCE

  • Pose in challenging stances such as standing directly opposite someone, hands on hips or crossing your arms.

  • Engage in any physical contact, finger-pointing or long periods of fixed eye contact.

  • Make sudden movements which can be seen as threatening. Notice the tone, volume and rate of your speech.


Personal conduct to minimize violence7
PERSONAL CONDUCT TO MINIMIZE VIOLENCE

  • Challenge, threaten, or dare the individual. Never belittle the person or make him/her feel foolish.

  • Criticize or act impatiently toward the agitated individual.

  • Attempt to bargain with a threatening individual.

  • Try to make the situation seem less serious than it is


Personal conduct to minimize violence8
PERSONAL CONDUCT TO MINIMIZE VIOLENCE

  • Make false statements or promises you cannot keep.

  • Try to impart a lot of technical or complicated information when emotions are high.

  • Take sides or agree with distortions.

  • Invade the individual’s personal space. Make sure there is a space of 3’ to 6’ between you and the person.


Critical incident stress debriefing
CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS DEBRIEFING

  • CASE STUDY #4 - Preparation Pays Off



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