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Clearing a Path Through the Transition Jungle. Administrators’ Management Meeting Thursday, September 18, 2008 Friday, September 19, 2008. Context for Improving Transition. Factors Federal policy (e.g., IDEA) State and local policy Community Effective practices.

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Clearing a path through the transition jungle l.jpg

Clearing a Path Through the Transition Jungle

Administrators’ Management Meeting

Thursday, September 18, 2008

Friday, September 19, 2008


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Context for Improving Transition

Factors

  • Federal policy (e.g., IDEA)

  • State and local policy

  • Community

  • Effective practices


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IDEA Accountability Mandates

Continuous Improvement Monitoring Process (CIMP) – Compliance with IDEA

State Performance Plan (SPP)

Annual Performance Report (APR)


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State Performance Plan

Transition Indicators


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State Performance Plan

Mandated by OSEP

Developed for 2005-2010

Required of all states

Updated annually

Both documents must be submitted to OSEP February 1st annually.

State determinations are made based on the review of each states annual performance reports.

SPP/APR

  • Annual Performance Report

    • Reflects progress or slippage in meeting the measurable and rigorous targets established in the SPP

    • Includes revisions to the State’s targets, improvement activities, timelines or resources in the SPP and justifications for the revisions


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State Performance PlanTransition Indicator 1

  • Percent of youth with IEPs graduating from high school with a regular diploma


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State Performance PlanTransition Indicator 1 Targets/Outcomes

  • 2006 (2006-07)

    • 39.8% target; actual outcome data 39.9% (9,809/24,567)

  • 2007 (2007-08)

    • 31 districts were targeted for improvement based on 2006-07 data

    • 40.3% target


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Indicator 1: Graduation Rate Data

TARGET MET


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State Performance PlanTransition Indicator 2

  • Percent of youth with IEPs dropping out of high school


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State Performance PlanTransition Indicator 2 Targets/Outcomes

  • 2006-07

    • 17 districts targeted based on 2005-06 data

    • 4.25% target; actual outcome data 5.39% (7,047/13,797)

  • 2007-08

    • 32 districts targeted based on 2006-07 data

    • 4.0% target


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Indicator 2: Dropout Rate Data

TARGET NOT MET


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State Performance PlanTransition Indicator 13(Compliance Indicator)

  • 100% percent of youth aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the postsecondary goals.


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Indicator 13: Transition IEPs

  • In 2007-08, all districts completed a self-assessment that included Indicator 13


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State Performance PlanTransition Indicator 13 Outcomes

  • Actual Data for 2007-08

    Secondary Transition Standard B (16) (STB)

    • 72 districts assessed

    • February 22, 2008: Preliminary reports disseminated

    • April 25, 2008: Timeline for correction of noncompliance for individual students and submission of corrective action plans


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State Performance PlanTransition Indicator 13 Outcomes

  • Actual Data for 2007-08

    Secondary Transition Standard B (16)

    • STB-16: The IEP includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition service that will reasonably enable the student to meet the postsecondary goals.

    • 88.9% of districts; 84.70% systemic


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State Performance PlanTransition Indicator 14

  • Percent of youth who had IEPs, are no longer in secondary school and who have been competitively employed, enrolled in some type of postsecondary education, or both, within one year of leaving high school.


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State Performance PlanTransition Indicator 14 Targets

  • States were not required to report on Indicator 14 with the February 2008 submission of the Annual Performance Report (APR) for 2006-2007. New baseline was established for which reporting will begin with the 2009 APR submission.

  • 2006-07 Baseline (2005-06 Post-School Outcomes for Students with Disabilities)

    • 48.1% Employed/Military

    • 18.9% Continuing Education

    • 55.2% Employed and/or Continuing Education


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Indicator 14: Post-School Outcome Data

2006-07 is new baseline.


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Using Transition Indicators to Improve What We Do

  • Post-School Outcomes

  • ~Indicator 14~

  • Postsecondary education and/or training

  • Employment

  • Independent living

Not so good?

Good?

Why? Why Not?

  • Dropping Out

  • ~Indicator 2~

  • Why?

  • Appropriate programs?

  • Address student and family needs?

  • Graduation

  • ~Indicator 1~

  • Expectations and standards?

  • Various pathways available?

  • Linkage to post-school environments?

  • What’s the Quality of Our IEPs?

  • ~Indicator 13~

  • Measurable post-school and annual goals

  • Transition-related assessments

  • Course of study, services, and activities

  • Coordination of services


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Model for Extending Transition Research

Effective Transition Practices

Increase Capacity to Implement Effective Transition Practices

Facilitate Implementation of Effective Transition Practices

Technical Assistance

Data-Based Decision Making

Professional Development

Policy Analysis and Change


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Our Challenge

How do we link what we’ve learned from transition research with practices in our schools and communities?

Research

Compliance

Practice


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Guidance for Implementing Secondary Transition

GIST


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Purpose

Develop a continuous improvement process – model – structure -- for implementing secondary transition education and services


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Our Focus

Develop a “resource” for secondary educators to facilitate continuous improvement of secondary transition education and services


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Our Focus

Develop a continuous improvement

process

model

structure

system

to implement secondary transition education and services


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GIST Development


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Approach

Structured Conceptualization Process

Articulated our issue, question, goal

Generated ideas

Structured our ideas

Analyzed the structures we generated

Interpreted the structures

Use and take action


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Our Outcome

A concept map of what we think

Indication of our priorities

See “Characteristics of the Guidance for Implementing Secondary Transition – GIST Model: Final Conceptualization from the GIST Workgroup”


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Content Workgroups

  • Region 1

    • Vision and Mission

  • Region 2

    • Design and Development

    • Implementation and Sustainability

  • Region 3

    • Features that Promote Accessibility and Flexibility

    • Tools to Facilitate Use and Application of Information

  • Region 4

    • Target Audience and Intended Users

    • Content


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Identifying GIST Content

Topical workgroups

For each of the four regions

Develop topical content


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Kohler’s Taxonomy for Transition Programming

Family Involvement

Student-Focused Planning

Program Structures

Student Development

Interagency Collaboration


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Kohler’s Taxonomy for Transition Programming

STUDENT-FOCUSED PLANNING

  • IEP Development

  • Student Participation

  • Planning Strategies

INTERAGENCY COLLABORATION

  • Collaborative Framework

  • Collaborative Service Delivery

  • FAMILY INVOLVEMENT

  • Family Training

  • Family Involvement

  • Family Empowerment

  • STUDENT DEVELOPMENT

  • Life Skills Instruction

  • Employment Skills Instruction

  • Career & Vocational Curricula

  • Structured Work Experience

  • Assessment

  • Support Services

  • PROGRAM STRUCTURES

  • Program Philosophy

  • Program Policy

  • Strategic Planning

  • Program Evaluation

  • Resource Allocation

  • Human Resource Development


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NASET* Standards

  • Schooling

  • Career Preparatory Experiences

  • Youth Development and Youth Leadership

  • Family Involvement

  • Connecting Activities

    *National Alliance for Secondary Education and Transition


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GIST Rollout and Implementation


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Transition Steering Committee


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Our Challenge

To identify and align our resources to meet our communities’ needs

Research

Monitoring

Research

Compliance

Practice

Practice


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Model for Extending Transition Research

Effective Transition Practices

Increase Capacity to Implement Effective Transition Practices

Facilitate Implementation of Effective Transition Practices

Technical Assistance

Data-Based Decision Making

Professional Development

Policy Analysis and Change


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Our Perspectives

Collaboration and team work

Shared resource commitment

Respect for state context

Proactive rather than reactive

Transition-focused education is the goal

Extend research to practice

Capitalize on state resources!


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A Working “System” toFoster Continuous Improvement

Capacity building resources

Collaborative

Process

  • Steering committee structure


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Process

Organizing Our Resources

Work together to complete the big picture and fill in the details


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System Outcome

Organizing Our Resources

A structure that will enable us to identify and fill gaps in services and communicate effectively about our services


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Resources

  • National

    • National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities (NDPC-SD)

      http://www.ndpc-sd.org/

    • National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC)

      http://www.nsttac.org/

    • National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSET)

      http://www.ncset.org/


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Resources

  • National

    • National Division of Career Development and Transition (DCDT)

      http://www.dcdt.org/index.html

    • TransCen, Inc.

      http://www.transcen.org/

    • Transition Coalition

      http://transitioncoalition.org/transition/index.php


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Resources

  • Florida

    • Local Interagency Teams and Partners

    • Resources available through the Transition Services Provider EXPO

    • Indicators 1 and 2: [email protected]

    • Indicators 13 and 14:

      [email protected]


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Sheila GritzJoyce H. Lubbers

Program Specialist for Program Director

Transition [email protected]

[email protected]

325 West Gaines Street

601 Turlington Building

Tallahassee, FL 32399

Phone: (850) 245-0478

Fax: (850) 245-0955

For More Information


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Lyman Dukes, Ph.D., Principal Investigator

Jordan Knab, Ed.S., Project Director

University of South Florida St. Petersburg

529 1st Street South, SVB 108

St, Petersburg, FL 33701

p (727) 873-4661

f (727) 873-4660


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Initiatives

  • Capacity Building

  • Interagency Collaboration

  • Transition Legislation & Policy

  • Student Development & Outcomes


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Capacity Building

  • Regional Transition Representatives

  • Support GIST

  • Support Differentiated Accountability

  • Training & Technical Assistance

  • Product Development

  • District Mentoring Network

  • Research-Supported Activities


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Interagency Collaboration

  • Provide Support to state TSC

  • Collaborate in Related State Activities

  • Support District Level Interagency Councils


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Transition Legislation & Policy

  • Ongoing Electronic Communications

    • Transition Listserv

    • “Transition Wheel”

    • Timely Information when Educators Need It and CAN Access It: Transition Library


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Student Development & Outcomes

  • Product Review, Revision & Update

  • Support Pilot Activities using EBP

  • Spring Institute Focused on Transition Indicators


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How Will This Be Different?

  • Regional Representation

  • 21st Century Technology

  • Increased Collaboration

  • Increased Accountability


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Jordan Knab (727) 873-4662

  • QUESTIONS?

  • CONCERNS / IDEAS?

  • Random Thoughts?

  • Buzzing Noises?

  • Still Awake???


  • Login