putting development results first in africa
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Putting Development Results First in Africa

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 10

Putting Development Results First in Africa - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 76 Views
  • Uploaded on

AfCoP’s Contribution. Putting Development Results First in Africa. Solomon Mhlanga, Zimbabwe Meeting of the AfCoP - MfDR May 24, 2011 – Nairobi, Kenya. ROADMAP TO EFFECTIVE MFDR. 2003. 2005. 2008. 2011. CHALLENGES IN ACHIEVING RESULTS THROUGH AID.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Putting Development Results First in Africa' - ginger


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
putting development results first in africa

AfCoP’s Contribution

Putting Development Results First in Africa

Solomon Mhlanga, Zimbabwe

Meeting of the AfCoP-MfDR

May 24, 2011 – Nairobi, Kenya

challenges in achieving results through aid
CHALLENGES IN ACHIEVING RESULTS THROUGH AID

Aid is a catalyst for development. However, it can incur:

  • Cumbersome administration costs
    • Prolific and uncoordinated number of indicators, donor missions, reports, audits, accounts. Numerous parallel structures.
  • A focus on short-term
    • Driving attention away from reform
  • An impact on governance
    • Weakens social contract, blurs responsibilities, donors acting like opposition
  • Wrong choices of activities
    • Donors impose agenda and ignore country needs
  • Weakened country ownership, capacity and accountability
mfdr and the paris declaration
MFDR AND THE PARIS DECLARATION

The Five 2005 Paris Declaration Principles:

  • Ownership

Developing countries take the lead in determining goals and priorities of their own development.

  • Alignment

Developing countries develop national development strategies and donors must support and use strengthened country systems, for data collection.

  • Harmonisation

Donors coordinate their actions to avoid duplication and adopt common procedures for aid delivery.

  • Mutual Accountability

Developing and donor countries are mutually accountable for results.

  • Managing for Development Results

Developing and donor countries focus on achieving and measuring development results.

progress since paris declaration
PROGRESS SINCE PARIS DECLARATION
  • 2011 Paris Declaration Monitoring Survey:
    • Measuresprogress of donor and developing countries
    • 91 countries participated
    • Overallprogress for donors and partnersis mixed
  • Evaluation of Paris DeclarationImplementation
    • 21 countries in 2011 including Benin, Cameroon, Ghana, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Senegal, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia
  • WP-EFF focus countries
    • Ghana, Malawi, Rwanda, and Mali
afcop and the mfdr agenda
AFCOP AND THE MFDR AGENDA

AfCoPis:

  • Advocatingkeyresultsprinciples
    • Helping to permeateMfDR practices in the dailywork of members
    • AfCoPmembersresponded to Paris Declarationsurvey
  • Participating in the OECD-DAC SupportedWorking Party on AidEffectiveness’ Cluster E – Global Partnership on MfDR
    • AfCoPisvalued as primary source of MfDR good practices
    • Member participations in meetings
  • Participating in Consultative Forums throughmembers
    • 2ndAfrica Meeting on AidEffectivenes, Tunisia, Nov. 2010
    • Forum on AidEffectiveness in Rural Dev., April 2011
context
Context
  • Budget difficulties in traditionaldonor countries
    • End of Growing Official Aid Budgets
    • Growth of 2% a YearFrom 2011-2013 (OECD-DAC)
    • Need to Leveraging New Resources and Improving the Dysfunctional International Aid Architecture
  • New Aid Architecture
    • Middle-Income Countries, China
    • Large NGOs
    • Transnational corporations
  • Pressure to DeliverResults
    • Stock Taking of Progress Since Paris Declaration
    • Progress Toward the MDG Targets
mfdr and the 4 th hlf
MFDR AND THE 4TH HLF
  • Technical Discussions
  • Political Messages
  • High-Level Agreements & Outcomes
what this means for africa
What This Means for Africa

The 2010 Tunis Consensus:

  • Building capable states
  • Developing democratic accountability
  • Promoting South-South cooperation
  • Thinking and acting regionally
  • Embracing new development partners
  • Outgrowing aid dependence

A focus on results:

  • Strengthened country systems to be used by development partners for data collection and analysis
  • A focus on the outputs and outcomes in all aspects of public sector management
ad