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Planning for Effective Guided Reading. The Learning Zone Planning a guided reading lesson. Agenda. Fountas , I. C. & Pinnell , G. S. 2001. Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann . The Learning Zone. What the learner can do independently.

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Agenda

The Learning Zone

Planning a guided reading lesson

Agenda


The learning zone

  • Fountas, I. C. & Pinnell, G. S. 2001. Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

The Learning Zone

What the learner can do independently

What the learner can do with the support of an expert other

Learning Zone


Guided reading the learning zone

makes it possible to teach at the cutting edge of students’ understanding

teacher support is light

students assume responsibility for problem solving

teaching helps students read more productively and more intensively

Fountas, I. C. & Pinnell, G. S. 2001. Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Guided Reading & The Learning Zone


Zoom lens

provide very specific and focused instruction to small groups of students

address students’ needs at one particular point on the developmental continuum in order to expand and refine their reading ability

Fountas, I. C. & Pinnell, G. S. 2001. Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann

Zoom Lens


Text selection

Read the entire text. groups of students

Review the Fountas and Pinnell Continuum (selecting text section) and identify the focus of the lesson.

Think about how you will address the focus of the lesson in the introduction of the lesson.

Text Selection


Planning the guided reading lesson fiction

  • With groups of studentsyour students in mind, think through the shape of a guided reading lesson for a fiction text. Consider:

    • What will you address in the introduction?

    • How will you invite students to access background information?

    • What text organization characteristics will you point out to the students?

      • Fountas, I. C. & Pinnell, G. S. 2001. Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann

Planning the Guided Reading Lesson Fiction


Planning the guided reading lesson cont d

  • Which concepts/vocabulary will you cover in advance, and which will you leave for students to discover?

  • How will you break up the reading? What are the natural dividing points?

    • Fountas, I. C. & Pinnell, G. S. 2001. Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann

Planning the Guided Reading Lesson (cont’d.)


Planning the guided reading lesson cont d1

  • Determine some possible discussion points to introduce when you revisit the text after reading. Consider:

    • How can you help students relate ideas in the text to their personal, world and literacy knowledge?

    • How can you help students summarize and synthesize information from the text?

    • How can you help students think about the text?

    • How can you help students think beyond the text?

      • Fountas, I. C. & Pinnell, G. S. 2001. Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann

Planning the Guided Reading Lesson (cont’d.)


Debriefing the lesson plan

Debriefing the Lesson Plan


Sharing

  • Summarize what you have learned by doing this work. explain the decisions you made for each section of the lesson. Consider:

    • How will your teaching in guided reading change as a result of this work?

    • How will the changes support students becoming independent readers?

Sharing


Planning for guided reading lesson nonfiction

  • With explain the decisions you made for each section of the lesson. Consider:your students in mind, think through the shape of a guided reading lesson for a nonfiction text. Consider:

    • What will you address in the introduction?

    • How will you invite students to access background information?

    • What text organization characteristics will you point out to the students?

      • Fountas, I. C. & Pinnell, G. S. 2001. Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann

Planning for Guided Reading Lesson: Nonfiction


Planning for guided reading lesson nonfiction cont d

Planning for Guided Reading Lesson: Nonfiction (cont’d.)


Planning for guided reading lesson nonfiction cont d1

  • Determine which will you leave for students to discoversome possible discussion points to introduce when you revisit the text after reading. Consider:

    • How can you help students relate ideas in the text to their personal, world and literacy knowledge?

    • How can you help students summarize and synthesize information from the text?

    • How can you help students think about the text?

    • How can you help students think beyond the text?

      • Fountas, I. C. & Pinnell, G. S. 2001. Guiding Readers and Writers Grades 3-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann

Planning for Guided Reading Lesson: Nonfiction (cont’d.)


Wrap up

With your building grade level partners set goals for guided reading for the next couple of weeks.

Brainstorm ways you can help one another achieve your goals.

Wrap-Up


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