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Scaled Approach and YRO – YOT briefing events. 26 August – 8 October 2009. Objectives. Have an in depth understanding of the new sentencing framework Understand how the Scaled Approach interacts with the new sentencing framework

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Scaled approach and yro yot briefing events

Scaled Approach and YRO – YOT briefing events

26 August – 8 October 2009


Objectives

Objectives

  • Have an in depth understanding of the new sentencing framework

  • Understand how the Scaled Approach interacts with the new sentencing framework

  • Understand the purpose and use of National Standards, Case Management Guidance and Criminal Justice & Immigration Act Practice Guidance in the context of the changes


Scaled approach and yro yot briefing events

* Presentation & exercise


Scaled approach and yro yot briefing events

* Presentation & exercise


Approach to the slides

Approach to the slides


Approach to the event table activities

Approach to the event: Table activities

Case Studies

and Activities

Feedback at tables (small groups)

Facilitator at each table to

support and provide

guidance

Referral

Orders

Intensive

Supervision &

Surveillance

Youth

Rehabilitation

Order

Enforcement

&

Compliance

YRO

Requirements

Packages of

Intervention

Scaled

Approach


After this event what should you do

After this event what should you do?

  • Think about throughout the two days, how and what you might need to deliver back at your YOT

  • Schedule de-briefing events at your YOT

  • Plan for activities that need to take place post the go-live


Update on guidance

Update on guidance


Update on guidance national standards for youth justice

Update on guidance:National Standards for Youth Justice

  • MUST DO

  • Minimum standards for youth justice

  • DO NOT address regime standards

  • Primarily focussed on community but also interface between YOTs and key partners e.g. secure estate

  • Used in conjunction with:

    • Case Management Guidance

    • Criminal Justice & Immigration Act Practice Guidance

    • Key Elements of Effective Practice


Update on guidance national standards what s changed

Update on guidance: National Standards - What’s changed?

  • Youth Rehabilitation Order and Scaled Approach

  • Remand Planning and Remand Reviews

  • DTO planning meetings which reflect different lengths of orders

  • Quality Assurance for assessments

  • CAF undertaken in line with local procedures

  • Connectivity and other WUYJ processes

  • Maximisation of victim involvement

  • Intensive Supervision and Surveillance

  • Clarified and updated long-term custodial sentences and Hospital Order standards


Scaled approach and yro yot briefing events

Update on guidance: Case Management Guidance

  • HOW TO

  • Aimed at practitioners and managers in the community

  • Covering operational and case management responsibilities

  • Each section has a reviewing and improving practice section

  • Can be used by Secure Estate and partners to look at guidance provided to YOTs

  • Used in conjunction with:

    • National Standards for Youth Justice

    • Criminal Justice & Immigration Act Practice Guidance

    • Key Elements of Effective Practice


Update on guidance criminal justice and immigration act practice guidance

Update on guidance: Criminal Justice and Immigration Act Practice Guidance

  • NOT statutory guidance

  • Main focus is the YRO but other key CJ&I act provisions are included

  • Enable practitioners and managers to have basic understand of implications of legislation

  • NOT intended to be a comprehensive guide to legal or practice implications of the new legislation

  • MUST be used in conjunction with:

    • National Standards for Youth Justice

    • Case Management Guidance

    • Key Elements of Effective Practice


Update on guidance key elements of effective practice and source documents

Update on guidance: Key Elements of Effective Practice and Source Documents

  • WHAT TO DO

  • To be used by YOTs and secure establishments

  • Describe the features of and approaches to effective interventions, by identifying the key elements which are known to work

  • Primary tool for evidence based self assessment and quality assurance, providing the benchmark for effective practice

  • Relevant for those involved in delivery / operational and first-line and strategic managers

  • Used in conjunction with:

    • National Standards for Youth Justice

    • Criminal Justice & Immigration Act Practice Guidance

    • Case Management Guidance


Criminal justice and immigration act cj i 2008

Criminal Justice and Immigration Act (CJ&I) 2008

Purposes of Sentencing

Community Related Changes

Custody Related Changes


Purposes of sentencing

Purposes of sentencing

Brings purposes of sentencing in line with principal aim of preventing offending and gives equal weight to other factors including welfare

When sentencing an offender under 18 the courts should give equal weight to:

the principal aim of the youth justice system (prevent offending)

the welfare of the young person in accordance with section 44 of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933, and

the purposes of sentencing

punishment

reform and rehabilitation

protection of the public

making of reparation


Balancing the purposes of sentencing

Balancing the Purposes of sentencing

Far more than with adults, the approach to sentence will be individualistic

In balancing the purposes of sentencing, the key elements are:

the age of the offender (chronological and emotional)

the seriousness of the offence

the likelihood of further offences being committed and

the extent of harm caused or likely to result

Proper regard for welfare concerns such as mental health, capability and learning difficulties or disorders all which might affect the likelihood of the purposes being achieved

(Sentencing Guidelines Council)


Welfare considerations

Welfare Considerations

Mental Health

Culpability

when addressing

seriousness

Speech & language

difficulties

Courts

and

YOTs

Ability / willingness

to engage in court

Learning difficulties

/ disabilities

Vulnerability

Purpose / type /

length of sentence

and requirements

Feelings of

discrimination

Experiences of

loss or abuse

Ability to

understand and

comply with sentence

Adolescence

(Sentencing Guidelines Council and Judicial Studies Board)


Courts approach to sentencing

Courts Approach to Sentencing

Assess offence seriousness

Consider offender mitigation

Principal aim (prevent offending) and welfare

Balance the purposes of sentencing

Magistrates will use above to determine if PSR / report required

YOTs will need to take the magistrates decision in to account

Sentencing Decision Reached


Other legislative provisions

Other legislative provisions


Community related changes

Community related changes

Youth Conditional Cautions (YCC)

Higher-tariff, pre-court disposal available for use by police

Joint Youth Justice Unit are still working on securing pilot sites

November 2009 launch with proviso of commencement order

Youth Default Order

Power in lieu of unpaid fine to impose unpaid work (16-17 yrs), curfew (with or without EM) or attendance centre (only)

Anti-social behaviour changes

Statutory one year reviews of ASBOs for under 17 year olds

ISOs must be issued with every ASBO where magistrates’ court consider it would help prevent further antisocial behaviour


Community related changes 2

Community related changes (2)

‘Spent’ warnings, reprimands and cautions

Reprimands and Warning spent once given

Conditional Cautions spent after three months

Sexual offences Prevention Orders

Some young people are eligible for these if convicted of an offence listed under Schedule 3 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003


Custody related changes

Custody related changes

PSR must be in writing where possible custody sentence likely

Public protection sentences – minimum custodial term of 2 years before any reduction for time spent on remand or before consideration of release on licence

Curfew credit for tagged bail periods, at courts discretion if 9+ hours per day, to be taken into account in fixing custodial period

Young people aged 17 years can be tagged on bail, if court satisfied bail would not otherwise be given

Subject to satisfaction re risk of serious harm to others, automatic 28 day release after recall for 12+ months custody


Referral orders

Referral Orders

CJI Act changes

Custody Threshold cases


Referral order changes in the cj i act

Referral Order changes in the CJ&I Act

From 27th April 2009, Courts can make Referral Orders where:

  • There is one previous conviction and Referral Order not given

  • Previous bind over or conditional discharge

  • In exceptional circumstances on YOT recommendation in case with previous Referral Order

  • Also includes where a previous custodial sentence has been given

    And court discretion:

  • Discharge Referral Orders early for good behaviour

  • extend up to three months at YOT recommendation e.g. non-compliance


Issues since implementation

Issues since implementation

Second Referral Order (RO):

  • Second Referral Order can be given in exceptional circumstances, defined by the YOT’s recommendation to the Court.

  • Second RO cannot be given while the first RO is running. Also, the second RO for the new offence cannot run concurrently with the first RO.

  • First RO should be completed successfully and a gap of non offending should follow before a second RO is considered.

  • The first RO cannot be revoked in order to make a second RO.


Issues since implementation 2

Issues since implementation 2

Compensation:

  • Consider compensation within the RO contract to avoid using Compensation Order which is not spent until 30 months after the date on which it is given.

    Length of Panel Members’ Service

  • Following a review of Youth Offender Panel volunteer service, Ministers have decided that:

    • the tenure of current panel volunteers can be extended for a maximum of two years

    • any new panel volunteer recruited in the next 12 months will be recruited for a maximum of six years

    • the situation will be reviewed in 12 months.


Referral order custody threshold cases

Referral OrderCustody Threshold Cases

  • Custody threshold = adjourn for PSR

  • PSR proposal for a Referral Order should be presented as a robust and credible sentencing option which should involve a referral order intensive contract(Referral Order 09 guidance) – Available NOW

  • An referral order intensive contract should include:

    • the provision of similar resources to those available for other community sentences in custody threshold cases (up to 25 hrs / week)

    • the full range of intensive community intervention options, including non-electronic curfews

    • restrictions should be considered to match the requirements of the case

      (Referral Order 09 guidance)


Proposals to court

Proposals to Court

Consider a

pre-sentence

panel

Consider

pre-

sentence

panel

Considering

Intensive

Referral

Order?

Panel / YOT

determines

possible

elements

of

contract

PSR

Request

Undertake

assessment

Populate

Asset /

ROSH

Prepare PSR

Supervise

Under

Scaled

Approach?


Panel proposals

Panel Proposals

If a Referral Order is made:

  • YOT panel report includes PSR draft intervention plan

  • formal panel meeting within five working days to formally agree the contract (where a pre-court panel was held prior to sentence).

  • intensive contract with full range intensive interventions similar to other community sentence custody threshold cases


Case study referral order

Case Study - Referral Order

30 mins

  • Review Case Study

  • Consider the Asset / ROSH for Stefan

  • Consider summary page showing indicative intervention level

  • Determine what might be the appropriate level of supervision based on your assessment

  • What representations / recommendations would you make to the Referral Panel and Court in relation to the young persons intervention

    • Why make the proposal?

    • What would it look like?

  • Record on Activity template


Key learning

Key Learning

Guidance

  • Referral Order Guidance 2009

  • CJ&I Act Practice Guidance and Legislation

  • National Standards 2009

    Key Messages

  • Referral Order intensive contracts are optional but should be used to prevent young people unnecessarily receiving custody

  • Should ideally be done in consultation with Panel prior to sentence

  • Locally determined criteria for threshold for referral

  • Consider most appropriate use of YOT resources and programmes to facilitate these intensive contracts i.e. not advisable to mix referral order and ISS young people


Youth rehabilitation order yro

Youth Rehabilitation Order (YRO)

  • The Youth Rehabilitation Order (YRO) – overview

  • Requirements

  • Application of the Scaled Approach

  • Transitional Arrangements


Yro key information

YRO – key information

Only available for cases serious enough to justify a community sentence (courts not obliged)

Is a single community sentence within which a court may include one or more requirements variously designed to provide punishment, protection of the public, for reducing offending and for reparation

Content and length based on principles of proportionality and suitability given that restrictions on liberty must be commensurate with the offence


Activity yro overview

Activity – YRO Overview

10 mins

  • In your pack there are some statements about the YRO with the answers on a separate page

  • Match the words to the statements

  • There will be a prize for the quickest table finished with the correct answers


Yro requirements

YRO Requirements

  • What are they?

  • How do they work?

  • When can they be used?

  • Who is responsible for enforcement?


What does the yro replace

What does the YRO replace?

Action Plan Order

Attendance Centre Order

Community Punishment & Rehabilitation Order

Community Punishment Order

Community Rehabilitation Order

Curfew Order

Drug Treatment and Testing Order

Supervision Order

Exclusion Order


Yro requirements1

YRO Requirements

Supervision Requirement

Programme Requirement

Activity Requirement

Attendance Centre Requirement

Curfew Requirement

Education Requirement

Residence Requirement (16/17 year olds only)

Local Authority Residence Requirement

Drug Treatment Requirement

Drug Testing Requirement

Mental Health Treatment Requirement

Intoxicating Substance Treatment Requirement

Exclusion Requirement

Prohibited Activity Requirement

Electronic Monitoring Requirement

Unpaid Work Requirement (16/17 year olds only)

Intensive Fostering

Intensive Supervision and Surveillance

Alternatives to Custody


Activity

Activity

What is it?

  • Requires young person to engage in activities specified in their order

    How does it work?

  • No more than 90 days

  • Residential (7 days and requires parents/ carers must consent)

  • Must consult with YOT and be satisfied of local provision

  • Consent where third party involvement

  • Can be used to deliver reparation

    When is it appropriate?

  • To prevent further offending and address all levels on the Scaled Approach model

  • If enhanced or intensive, additional requirements should be considered

    Who manages this requirement?

  • The YOT is responsible for monitoring and enforcement

  • Reliant on information of compliance and engagement from external service providers


Supervision

Supervision

What is it?

  • Replaces the current Supervision Order. Requires young person to meet with the responsible officer or other nominated person as agreed

    How does it work?

  • Maximum of 3 years

  • When attached will last the duration of the order

  • To be managed in line with scaled approach intervention level

    When is it appropriate?

  • To prevent further offending and address all on the Scaled Approach

  • Can be used as the vehicle for addressing a young person’s offending behaviour

    Who manages this requirement?

  • The YOT is responsible for monitoring and enforcement

  • Reliant on information of compliance and engagement from external service providers


Unpaid work

Unpaid Work

What is it?

  • Replaces current community punishment order for 16 and 17 year olds. Requires a young person to undertake unpaid work for the specified number of hours

    How does it work?

  • Only available for 16 and 17 year olds

  • 40 hours to 240 hours

  • Young person must be suitable to undertake the work and that provision must be available in the local area

  • Specified work must be undertaken within 12 months from when the order came into effect

  • YRO remains in force until the young person has completed the unpaid work

    When is it appropriate?

  • Vehicle for repairing harm to the young person’s community

    Who manages this requirement?

  • Local probation service responsible for delivery

  • Stand alone monitoring when this is the only requirement.

  • YOT responsible for breach on behalf of the local probation service


Programme

Programme

What is it?

  • Requires young person to engage in systematic number of activities (a programme) at a specified place on a specified number of days

    How does it work?

  • Programme must be recommended by the YOT

  • Programme must be available at the place(s) specified

  • If a third person’s compliance is necessary, that person must consent

    When is it appropriate?

  • Should be considered when a young person’s assessment shows them to be suitable for the specified programme e.g. specific offending behaviour programme

  • Young person must be capable of managing attendance and participation

    Who manages this requirement?

  • The YOT is responsible for monitoring and enforcement

  • Reliant on information of compliance and engagement from external service providers


Attendance centre

Attendance Centre

What is it?

Replaces the current Attendance Centre Order and requires the young person to attend the attendance centre for the number of hours specified in the order

How does it work?

Aged 16 and over = 12 – 36 hours

Aged 14 and over but under 16 = 12 - 24 hours

Aged under 14 = no more than 12 hours

Maximum of 3 hours per day

Maximum of 1 session per day

When is it appropriate?

For the majority of young people to prevent further offending and address all levels of likelihood of reoffending as described in the Scaled Approach model

Who manages this requirement?

Attendance Centre Protocol – adapt for local purposes

Attendance centre officer is in charge of monitoring compliance

YOT responsible for determining and prosecuting breach


Prohibited activity

Prohibited Activity

What is it?

Requires that the young person must not participate in specified activities on the day or days specified or during a set period of time

How does it work?

A court may not attach unless it has consulted with the YOT or local Probation

When is it appropriate?

Where a young person’s offending is linked to a particular activity and prohibiting this activity would be an effective way to prevent further offending.

Prohibited activities may include non-association with certain peers

Who Manages this requirement?

The YOT manages this requirement but will need to put in place agreements with local partners to ensure it is able to effectively monitor and enforce it.


Curfew

Curfew

What is it?

  • This replaces the current curfew order and requires a young person to remain in a specified place for a specified period of time

    How does it work?

  • Cannot be for less than 2 hours or more than 12 hours in any day

  • Only available for up to 6 months starting on the day the requirement first takes effect

    When is it appropriate?

  • Should be considered when there is a clearly identified time-based pattern of offending and a curfew during that period of time would contribute to preventing further offending

    Who manages this requirement?

  • If imposed alongside one or more other YRO requirements for which the YOT is ordinarily case manager of if it is a stand alone curfew requirement (i.e. no electronic monitoring requirement attached) the YOT is responsible for monitoring and enforcement


Electronic monitoring

Electronic Monitoring

What is it?

Means that the young person must remain in a specified place for the specified period

How does it work?

Must be attached to a curfew requirement unless the court considers it inappropriate to do so or is prevented from doing so because:

Third part cooperation is required and not obtained

The court has not been notified by the Secretary of State of the local availability of EM

When is it appropriate?

Where it is considered that the imposition of this requirement will encourage and enable young people to comply with their curfew requirement and prevent further offending

Who manages this requirement?

Where there is only a curfew requirement with EM, the EM provider will monitor and enforce

Where there are additional requirement ordinarily managed by the YOT, the YOT will monitor and enforce on advice from the EM provider


Exclusion

Exclusion

What is it?

The exclusion requirement replaces the current Exclusion Order

Prohibits a young person from entering a place for a specified period

How does it work?

Period must not be longer than 3 months

May specify exclusion from a particular place or area for different periods over different days

When is it appropriate?

Should be considered where there is an identifiable geographical / physical pattern of offending by the young person and excluding them from an area or premises will help to prevent further offending.

Who Manages this requirement?

The YOT manages this requirement but will need to put in place agreements with local partners to ensure it is able to effectively monitor and enforce it.


Residence

Residence

What is it?

Requires the young person to reside with an individual specified in the order or in a place specified in the order

How does it work?

Courts cannot specify an individual with whom the young person is to reside unless that person consents

Courts cannot specify a place of residence unless the young person is over 16 years at the time of conviction (a ‘place of residence’ requirement)

Courts must consider the young persons home circumstances and that these are contributing to the young persons offending behaviour

When is it appropriate?

Should only be considered where a young person’s current living arrangements are contributing to their offending behaviour

Who manages this requirement?

The YOT in original home authority responsible for monitoring and enforcing

Reliant on progress information from the person with whom the young person is residing


Local authority residence

Local authority residence

What is it?

Requires the young person to reside in accommodation provided by or on behalf of the local authority

How does it work?

Court must consult with parents/ guardians before imposing

Court must consult with the local authority in which the young person is to reside and which will be specified in the order

Can stipulate that the young person is not to be placed with a specified individual

Maximum duration of 6 months

Cannot include any period after the young person has reached 18 years of age

When is it appropriate?

Where it is considered a young person’s living arrangements have contributed to their offending behaviour

Who manages this requirement?

YOT responsible for monitoring and enforcing this requirement

Reliant on information from the authority responsible for the young person’s accommodation


Mental health treatment

Mental health treatment

What is it?

Requires young person to submit to treatment by or under the direction of a registered medical practitioner/ chartered psychologist for the period of time specified

How does it work?

Can be either residential or non residential treatment

Before imposing, the court must have evidence from registered medical practitioner that the young person may be susceptible to treatment

The young person must express a willingness to comply

Court must be satisfied that there is local provision to deliver the requirement

When is it appropriate?

Will only be appropriate for those young people where previous voluntary engagement has failed and where their mental health conditions has been identified as a substantive factor in their offending behaviour

Who manages this requirement?

The YOT is responsible for monitoring and enforcement

Reliant on information of compliance and engagement from external service providers


Drug treatment

Drug treatment

What is it?

Requires a young person to submit to treatment during a specified time with the view to reduce or eliminate their dependency on, or propensity to misuse, drugs

How does it work?

Can be residential or non-residential treatments

Court must be satisfied of young persons dependency or propensity to misuse drugs and that they would be susceptible to treatment

Court must be satisfied that local arrangements are in place to deliver this requirement as advised by the Secretary of State and it must have been recommended by the YOT or probation as suitable for the young person

The young person must have expressed a willingness to comply

When is it appropriate?

Should only be attached where previous voluntary engagement has failed and where the young person’s drug misuse has been identified as a substantive factor in their offending behaviour

Who manages this requirement?

The YOT is responsible for monitoring and enforcement

Reliant on information of compliance and engagement from external service providers


Drug testing

Drug testing

What is it?

  • Requires a young person to provide samples as instructed by their responsible officer

    How does it work?

  • Can only be imposed if drug treatment requirement also imposed

  • Court cannot attach to a YRO unless advised by the Secretary of State of the availability of local arrangements

  • Young person must express a willingness to comply

    When is it appropriate?

  • Can be imposed along side drug treatment requirement where it is considered it would help the young person in remaining drug free

    Who manages this requirement?

  • The YOT is responsible for monitoring and enforcement

  • Reliant on information of compliance and engagement from external service providers


Intoxicating substance treatment

Intoxicating substance treatment

What is it?

Requires a young person to submit to treatment during a specified time with the view to reduce or eliminate their dependency on, or propensity to misuse, intoxicating substances

Includes alcohol or product whose fumes capable of being inhaled (NOT drugs)

How does it work?

Can be residential or non-residential treatments

Court must be satisfied of young persons dependency or propensity to misuse intoxicating substances and that they would be susceptible to treatment

Court must be satisfied that local arrangements are in place to deliver this requirement and it must have been recommended by the YOT or probation as suitable for the young person

The young person must have expressed a willingness to comply

When is it appropriate?

Should only be attached where previous voluntary engagement has failed and where the young person’s intoxicating substance misuse has been identified as a substantive factor in their offending behaviour

Who manages this requirement?

The YOT is responsible for monitoring and enforcement

Reliant on information of compliance and engagement from external service providers


Education

Education

What is it?

Requires young person to comply with approved education arrangements for a specified period of time

How does it work?

Young person must be of compulsory school age and requirement and cannot be order for any period beyond compulsory school age

Court must consult with local authority to ensure local provision is available

It is satisfied that the provision is suitable to the young person’s age, aptitude and any special educational needs

When is it appropriate?

May be used for young people whose non-attendance in education has been a significant factor in contributing to offending behaviour

Careful consideration should be given to recommending such a requirement and should be used only where absolutely necessary

Who manages this requirement?

The YOT is responsible for monitoring and enforcement

Reliant on information of compliance and engagement from external service providers


Intensive fostering

Intensive Fostering

Intensive Fostering mandatory requirements:

Pilot areas only (Wessex, Staffordshire, London and Trafford)

Court must consider whether living arrangements contributed to offending

Must end no later than 12 months

Must not include any period of time after the young person has turned 18

Young person would become looked after

Must include Supervision Requirement

For both IF and ISS, additional requirements can be attached (e.g. programme requirement) but the YRO is still considered a YRO with ISS / Intensive Fostering


Key learning1

Key Learning

Guidance

  • Case Management Guidance

  • National Standards

  • Criminal Justice and Immigration Act practice guidance

    Key Messages

  • Provisions will need to be made available locally if full range of requirements are to be used

  • Whilst YOT supervises many of the requirements – they require partnership working e.g. prohibited activity requirement

  • Local understanding in relation to monitoring and enforcement responsibilities for certain requirements

  • If transferring a case to another area, you must check that the requirements are available – where they are not you will need to take the matter back to court


Yro and the scaled approach

YRO and the Scaled Approach

Courts Role in sentencing

Reports for Courts

Assessments and the Scaled Approach

Determining Requirements

Proposals to Court

Managing Requirements

Case Management


Assessments for reports

Assessments for reports

Court

requests

PSR

YOT

undertakes

assessment

Populate

Asset

(and ROSH

if applicable)

Court

indicates

likely

sentence

Determine

possible YRO

requirements

Gather

Info from

range of

sources

Determine

Scaled Approach

Intervention

level

Apply

professional

judgement if

applicable and

seek managerial

signoff

Prepare PSR

based on all

available info


Courts role in sentencing

Courts’ Role in Sentencing


Determining nature and extent of requirements

Determining nature and extent of requirements

Key factors from Sentencing Guidelines Council guidance are:

  • Seriousness of the offence

  • Purposes of sentencing the court wishes to achieve

  • Likelihood of reoffending

  • Ability of the offender to comply

  • Availability of requirements locally

    (Sentencing Guidelines Council)


Before making an order

Before making an order…

  • The court will consider a report or information from the YOT who will be seeking to identify an appropriate balance between:

    • the seriousness of the offence

    • the risk of harm in the future from any further offences

    • the needs of the young person

  • YOT will be undertake an assessment using Asset supported by professional judgement which will determine:

    • the likelihood of re-offending

    • the risk of serious harm to others

    • Scaled Approach Intervention level

      (Sentencing Guidelines Council)


Determining length

Determining Length

  • The court must fix a period within which the YRO must be completed (no be more than 3 years)

  • The order will commence the day after the order is made

  • BUT where subject to a DTO the court may specify that the YRO will take effect either on the day that supervision begins in relation to the DTO or on the expiry of that order

  • The young person is liable for re-sentence for the offences for which the order was made if convicted of another offence whilst the YRO is in force

  • Sufficient time should be allowed for order to be completed

    (Sentencing Guidelines Council)


In summary

In summary

  • The approach to the sentencing of a youth will be far more individualistic

  • Where a court is satisfied that a community penalty is appropriate and taking account of the assessment in the pre-sentence report (if ordered), the consideration process that the court should follow is:

    • what requirements are most suitable for the offender?

    • what overall period is necessary to ensure that all requirements may be satisfactorily completed?

    • are the restrictions on liberty that result from those requirements commensurate with the seriousness of the offence?

      (Sentencing Guidelines Council)


Requesting reports

Requesting Reports


Courts approach to sentencing1

Courts Approach to Sentencing

Assess offence seriousness

Consider offender mitigation

Principal aim (prevent offending) and welfare

Balance the purposes of sentencing

Magistrates will use above to determine if PSR / report required

YOTs will need to take the magistrates decision in to account

Sentencing Decision Reached


Reports for courts

Reports for Courts

  • Reports should be based on a thorough assessment of risks and needs BUT this does not preclude the use of:

    • existing reports

    • addendums / updates to existing reports

    • expedited reports (stand down written on the day of court OR shorter than usual time frame)

    • Specific sentence reports

    • where sufficient information exists

  • With sufficient forward planning by the YOT, adequate information should be made available to enable sentencing to take place on the day.

    (Case Management Guidance)


What are the changes to psrs

What are the changes to PSRs?

  • PSR standard format:

    • front sheet

    • sources of information

    • offence analysis, including impact of offence on the victim(s)

    • assessment of the young person, leading to a proposed intervention level

    • assessment of the need for parenting support

    • assessment of the risk to the community, including the Likelihood of Reoffending and Risk of Serious Harm (Scaled Approach)

    • conclusion and proposal for sentencing.

      (National Standards and Case Management Guidance)


Assessment of risk to the community

Assessment of risk to the community

This section of the PSR should include an assessment of:

  • Likelihood of Reoffending

    • Based on risk and protective factors from Asset

    • Specify the Likelihood of Reoffending including probable nature of further offending

  • Risk of Serious Harm

    • Based on Asset – Risk of Serious Harm and should specify level, including who is at risk and what plans to minimise risk

  • Scaled Approach Intervention Level

    • The assessed likelihood of reoffending and ROSH (where applicable) should lead to an indication of suitable level of intervention, to inform the final proposal.


Use of existing reports

Use of existing reports

Use of an existing report:

  • Must be based on an Asset assessment completed within last three months and where no significant change in circumstance or new information since the Asset was completed.

  • addresses offences similar in nature to the existing PSR.

  • must be quality assured by manager

  • Use of an existing report with an addendum:

    • above criteria are met

    • limited additional information is required to assist the court

    • must be quality assured by manager


Existing reports not to be used where

Existing Reports NOT to be used where

  • the existing PSR is based on an Asset that is more than three months old

  • there have been significant changes in circumstances/new information since the previous PSR was completed

  • the existing PSR does not sufficiently address the issues required to assist the court in making a decision about sentencing

  • the existing PSR was prepared for the youth court and the current sentencing exercise is being heard in the Crown Court

  • the young person is at risk of a custodial sentence


Key learning2

Key Learning

Guidance

  • Case Management Guidance

  • National Standards

    Key Messages

  • Don’t always need a PSR

  • Recent reports no older than 3 months can be used

  • Always a PSR when custody likely

  • Other report options still available i.e. expedited, specific sentence

  • CJSSS allows for flexibility and is always what's in the best interests of the young person

  • The PYO targets for PSR completion are no longer relevant. Priority cases (e.g. DYO) 10 day and all other reports in 15 days (locally agreed)


Assessment and the scaled approach

Assessment and the Scaled Approach


Where does the scaled approach apply

Where does the Scaled Approach apply?

  • The Scaled Approach should be used by the YOT to determine the level of intervention (either Standard, Enhanced or Intensive) required when a child or young person is subject to one of the following court orders:

    • Referral Order

    • YRO

    • Community element of a custodial sentence

Does not include pre-court interventions


Assessment

Assessment

  • Assessment supports:

    • the identification of risks and needs

    • an understanding of patterns of offending behaviour

    • the planning of effective interventions to prevent further offending

  • Assessments within the Youth Justice System should focus on:

    • Risk of Serious Harm to others

    • Likelihood of Reoffending

    • Risk of the young person being harmed, i.e. risk of vulnerability

  • Assessments are also likely to highlight other needs that may not be linked to the child or young person’s offending behaviour

    (Extract from Case Management Guidance)


Completing the static factors

Completing the Static factors

For current offence – Primary Index Offence

Record previous reprimands / cautions / warnings

If current conviction is the first conviction

do not score

For convictions prior to this offending episode only


Determining likelihood of reoffending dynamic factors

Determining Likelihood of Reoffending – dynamic factors


Determining intervention level

Determining intervention level


Factors affecting interventions

Factors affecting Interventions

  • Professional Judgement

    • Changes to the initial intervention level should be defensible, discussed and agreed with a manager, and the reasons clearly recorded.

  • Vulnerability and welfare considerations

    • Should ensure vulnerability is assessed and identify what action will be taken

    • Should not affect the Scaled Approach intervention levels, but should form part of the overall intervention plan, and vulnerability plan where one is needed.

  • Once a final judgement has been reached this should be used to inform the proposal made to the court or report to the youth offender panel.


Case study determining the intervention level

Case Study - Determining the Intervention Level

10 mins

  • Review change in Stefan’s circumstances

  • Review updated Asset sections

  • Populate the activity template / YOT workaround

  • Determine the intervention level

  • Inform your table facilitator of what you have determined.


Key learning3

Key Learning

Guidance

  • Scaled Approach Model Document

  • Case Management Guidance

  • National Standards

  • APIS KEEP

    Key Messages

  • Quality is paramount

  • Professional Judgement

  • Effective recording

  • Defensible decision making


Determining requirements

Determining Requirements


Determining appropriate requirements

Determining appropriate requirements

The content of the order proposed should be based on:

  • Indication from the court (offence seriousness and proportionality)

  • The assessment (including Asset / RoSH) of the risk factors that need to be addressed

  • The assessed intervention level

  • Professional judgement

  • The local availability of requirements and programmes that are most likely to reduce the likelihood of reoffending


Case study determining requirements and proposal to court

45 mins

Case Study - determining requirements and proposal to Court

  • You have determined Stefan’s Scaled Approach intervention level

  • The next step is to determine the appropriate proposal to court

  • You will need to

    • Review Anytown YOTs Package of Intervention (POINT)

    • Determine which requirements are appropriate

    • Choose a lead person to present your proposal to court

  • Your table facilitator will act as the magistrate and you must be prepared to take questions from the bench


Key learning4

Key Learning

Guidance

  • National Standards

  • Case Management Guidance

  • APIS KEEP

  • Offending Behaviour Programme KEEP

    Key Messages

  • What requirements are most suitable for the offender?

  • What overall period is necessary to ensure that all requirements may be satisfactorily completed?

  • Are the restrictions on liberty that result from those requirements commensurate with the seriousness of the offence?

  • YOT determines intervention level, courts determine overall sentence


Planning and delivering interventions

Planning and Delivering Interventions

Managing Requirements


Planning and delivering interventions1

Planning and delivering interventions

  • Should be the focus of YOT work in relation to preventing offending and reoffending by children and young people

  • A crucial element is a structured, effective and defensible approach to managing the risks presented by children and young people

  • The case manager is essential in ensuring that there is an overview of work being undertaken


Case manager and case management functions

Case manager and case management functions

  • assessment

  • targeting

  • intervention planning

  • management of risk

  • co-ordinating services

  • engagement and motivation

  • enabling and enforcing compliance

  • control and surveillance

  • review and evaluation


Intervention planning

Intervention Planning

Intervention plans should take into account the

  • Child or young person’s maturity

  • Learning style

  • Motivation

  • Speech and language considerations

  • The resources available locally

  • The assessed level intervention determined via the Scaled Approach


Managing requirements

Managing Requirements

Always remember:

  • In line with the Offending Behaviour KEEP source document, that all programmes with young people should be scaled to meet individual risk and needs

  • The YOT Case Manager should maintain sufficient contact with the child or young person in order to fully discharge their responsibilities as Case Manager (as outlined within YJB Case Management Guidance) and to ensure that the YRO requirements are delivered fully.


Which yro requirements can count towards scaled approach contacts

Which YRO requirements can count towards scaled approach contacts?


Managing requirements1

Managing Requirements

Will all YROs be managed under Scaled Approach CONTACTlevels?

Standalone: Curfew, Electronic Monitoring, Attendance Centre and Unpaid Work

Supervision Requirement

Supervision Requirement + other requirements?

X


What is a contact

What is a contact?

  • A contact is a face to face planned meeting between:

    • the child/ young person

    • the YOT case manager

    • another member of the YOT

    • a member of another agency or

    • a volunteer

  • And are approved to work with the young person in respect of the supervision of his or her court order


Scaled approach contacts

CAN BE INCLUDED:

Activity Requirement

Programme Requirement

Attendance Centre Requirement

Unpaid Work Requirement

Mental Health Treatment Requirement

Drug Treatment Requirement

Drug Testing Requirement

Intoxicating Substance Requirement

EXCLUDED FROM CONTACTS:

Education Requirement

Local Authority Residence Requirement.

Electronic Monitoring Requirement

Exclusion Requirement

Curfew Requirement

Prohibited Activity Requirement

Residence Requirement

Scaled Approach Contacts


Requirement delivery

Requirement Delivery

YRO

Programme

(12 sessions)

Supervision

Curfew with EM

Education

Attendance

Centre (36 hours)

Programme

Supervision (2 years)

Contacts in line with National Standards

Attendance

Centre

Education

Monthly Contacts

Curfew with

EM


Case study managing requirements

20 mins

Case Study – Managing Requirements

  • Review the court order from Anytown Youth Court

  • Consider all that you know about Stefan and discuss and determine how you would manage his order under your assessed level of intervention

  • Include how you might address welfare issues

  • Record your decisions on the Activity template


Key learning5

Key learning

Guidance

  • Case Management Guidance

  • National Standards

  • KEEPs – thematic

    Key Messages

  • Welfare issues

    • Are an important consideration at the point of sentence

    • Should be consider and addressed throughout intervention

    • Welfare issues NOT linked strongly linked to offending should still be dealt with but outside of statutory contacts and with involvement from partner agencies

  • Scaled Approach – more than just contacts

  • Takes account of young person’s individual circumstances


Quality assurance

Quality Assurance


The renewed focus on quality assurance

The renewed focus on quality assurance


What happens now

What happens now…

Sentence

Represents offence

seriousness and

proportionality

Asset

and ROSH

Number

of contacts

Nature of

intervention


What changes with the scaled approach

What changes with the Scaled Approach…

Sentence

Represents offence

seriousness and

proportionality

Asset

and ROSH

Number

of contacts

Nature of

intervention


What does this mean

What does this mean?

YOT assessments will have a much greater impact upon the level and nature of intervention than previously

Consequent responsibility to ensure the quality of assessments, reports and plans


Quality assurance principles

Quality Assurance principles


This section covers

This section covers:

  • Defining quality in youth justice

  • The three components of quality assurance

  • Responsibilities for quality assurance

  • When quality assurance should be used


What is quality in youth justice

What is quality in youth justice?

= Quality practice

Adhering to

MINIMUM STANDARDS

National standards

HMIP standards

YJB data guidance

(the ‘must’)

Selecting approaches on

the basis of the BEST

AVAILABLE EVIDENCE

KEEPs and KEEP

source documents

(the ‘what’)

Understanding HOW

interventions should be

carried out and applying it

Case management

guidance

(the ‘how’)


What is quality assurance

What is quality assurance?

Testing products and outputs (for example

reports and assessments)

Measuring effectiveness of products and outputs

Analysing themes and driving continual improvement


Testing products and outputs

Testing products and outputs


Measuring effectiveness of products and outputs

Measuring effectiveness of products and outputs


Analysing themes and driving continual improvement

Analysing themes and driving continual improvement


Data and the scaled approach and yro

Data and the Scaled Approach and YRO


Who s job is quality assurance

Who’s job is quality assurance?

  • Gatekeeping

  • Completeness

  • and quality

  • Individual QA

  • Completeness and quality

Peers and

Senior practitioners

Practitioners and admin

Service and

performance

managers

Operational

managers

  • Dip-sampling

  • Completeness and

  • quality

  • Themes and issues

  • Collation and analysis

  • service and individual improvement (PIF / KEEP self-assessment)


When should quality assurance be used

When should quality assurance be used?

As often as is necessary!

  • Based on:

  • How important the product / practice is

  • Who the audience is

  • What quality is currently like

  • The resources required to measure quality

At 14.45 this afternoon, there will be demonstrations of the QA tool


Key learning6

Key learning

Guidance

  • Case Management Guidance

  • National Standards

  • KEEPs – thematic

  • Youth Justice Planning Framework Guidance 2008

    Key Messages

  • The Scaled Approach and YRO will require YOTs to review their processes and materials

  • The success of the Scaled Approach relies heavily upon quality assessments, reports and plans

  • The YJB has provided assistance to YOTs in the form of:

    • KEEP self-assessment toolkit

    • Quality assurance materials


Transitioning from old to new orders

Transitioning from old to new orders


Scaled approach and yro yot briefing events

Old Orders

2004 NS

Old Orders

New NS

(apply Scaled Approach)

Offence

Sentenced

1

Offence

Sentenced

2

YRO

New NS

(apply Scaled Approach)

Offence

Sentenced

3

30 November 09


Activity transitional arrangements

20 mins

Activity – transitional arrangements

  • Review the statements on Activity Sheet

  • Answer the questions, stating fully your reason why you believe the answer to be correct

  • Your table facilitator will support your understanding should you be unable to answer the questions

  • Your facilitator will let you know if your answers are correct


Custody threshold and persistence

Custody threshold and persistence


Custody threshold

Custody threshold

  • Custodial sentences:

    • only if offence punishable by imprisonment

    • the court forms the opinion that the offence/s are so serious that a community sentence cannot be justified

    • court states YRO with Intensive Supervision and Surveillance (ISS) or Intensive Fostering not appropriate and reasons why (schedule 4 – paragraph 80 (3))

    • only imposed if custody is a last resort

  • Taking into account the young persons circumstances, age, maturity


Custody threshold 2

Custody threshold (2)

  • Certain sentences are only available where the young person is deemed as a ‘persistent offender’:

    • A YRO with Intensive Supervision Surveillance or Intensive Fostering for a young person aged 10 - 14 years

    • DTO for a young person aged 12 and 14 years

    • (This criterion does not have to be met before the Crown Court imposes long term detention or detention for life)

  • Similarly, additional powers may be available to a court where a youth rehabilitation order has been breached “wilfully and persistently”


Sgc guidance on persistence 1

SGC guidance on Persistence (1)

  • Not defined in legislation but has been considered by Court of Appeal and SGC has taken this into account

  • Court considers if the young person is one who persists in offending

  • At its simplest the young person will have had some contact with authority in which their offending conduct was challenged. This can include pre-court disposals but not Penalty Notice for Disorder as they do not require any admission of guilt

    (Sentencing Guidelines Council)


Guidance on persistence 2

Guidance on Persistence (2)

  • If custody is being considered (as a last resort) then it is likely that the offender will have admitted or been found guilty of an imprisonable offence on at least 3 separate occasions in the last 12 months (whether pre court disposal or a sentence of the court).

  • YJB is disputing the inclusion of pre court disposals

  • Court not obliged to impose a custodial sentence or ISS / IF

  • NB the guidelines state ‘likely’, therefore there is still some scope to classify as persistent with less than that in rare circumstances.

    (Sentencing Guidelines Council)


Wilful and persistent guidance

Wilful and Persistent - guidance

  • Offender is likely to be found to have “persistently” breached a YRO where there have been 3 breaches (at court) demonstrating a lack of willingness to comply with the order

  • The court must find the breaches to have been ‘wilful’ if it is to gain access to the extra powers

  • For a non-imprisonable offence, custody is an option only if:

    • following ‘wilful and persistent’ non-compliance of a YRO

    • And ‘wilful and persistent’ non-compliance with a YRO with Intensive Supervision and Surveillance or Intensive Fostering

    • Limits on length of time in custody – four months for the above situation


Yro intensive supervision and surveillance iss

YRO - Intensive Supervision and Surveillance (ISS)

Determining ISS Levels


Alternatives to custody

Alternatives to custody

  • The YRO brings into its remit two alternatives to custody:

    • YRO with Intensive Supervision and Surveillance (ISS)

    • YRO with Intensive Fostering (pilot areas only)

  • The conditions to be met for:

    • The offence must be imprisonable

    • Crosses the custody threshold

    • If young person under 15 years at time of conviction must be deemed persistent

      • If not deemed persistent but the offence is still deemed serious then a YRO with proportionate requirements should be imposed


Intensive supervision and surveillance

Intensive Supervision and Surveillance

  • ISS mandatory requirements:

    • An extended activity requirement (more than 90 days but no more than 180 days)

    • Supervision Requirement

    • A Curfew Requirement with electronic monitoring (standalone the exception)

  • Three levels of ISS now available:

    • Extended (12 month) ISS

    • Band 1 Intensity ISS (91 day activity)

    • Band 2 Intensity ISS (91 day activity)

How do you determine which level?


Case study yro iss

20 mins

Case Study – YRO ISS

  • Consider the changes in Stefan’s circumstances

  • Determine which level of ISS might be suitable


Key learning7

Key Learning

Guidance

  • National Standards

  • Case Management Guidance

  • ISS Operational Guidance

  • Criminal Justice and Immigration Act practice guidance

  • KEEP – APIS and Engaging Young People who Offend

    Key Messages

  • ISSP is still available for young people on community element of custodial sentence and bail

  • Further information in the ISS Operational Guidance


Enabling and enforcing compliance

Enabling and enforcing compliance

What does successful completion look like?

Enabling compliance

YRO and breach

Revocation and amendment


All is not as it seems

All is not as it seems…

  • What is the purpose of ‘Enabling and Enforcing’?

  • To achieve compliance? Not necessarily…you can comply and not engage.

  • To achieve engagement? Partially…you can engage and yet not fully comply.

  • It is about enabling the child or young person to successfully complete their order/requirements


What constitutes successful compliance

What constitutes successful compliance?

Is it:

  • Attendance at contacts as required by Order/ Requirements?

  • Engaging with the interventions provided (how appropriate are they?)

  • Behaving in line with agreed standards?

  • All of the above?


What constitutes unsuccessful compliance

What constitutes unsuccessful compliance?

  • How do we define ‘unacceptable’?

  • Is there a fixed definition of ‘unacceptable’? Can/should we apply a one size fits all approach? How is this developed locally?

  • Do we expect the same level of compliance from a yp undertaking 12 contacts per month vs. 2 contacts per month? How do we make these judgements?

  • Unacceptable behaviour

  • Not engaging with the intervention? There in body but not in mind? Links to Engaging Young People Who Offend KEEP/Offending Behaviour KEEP.


How do we enable compliance

How do we enable compliance?

Engaging Young People KEEP

  • Appropriate assessments leading to appropriate interventions

    • takes into account age and stage, maturity, speech and language, offending career (group vs. 1-1), gender, ethnicity etc

  • Sequencing of interventions – links to Maslow. Basics first then building to more cognitive interventions.

  • Use of review to ensure on track

  • Assessment is not a static process…use it to inform interventions

  • Coordination of services (e.g. between Children’s Services/ Education & YOT)

  • Information sharing and regular updates.


Specific groups

Specific groups

What about MAPPA young people?

  • Considerations of public protection/risk of serious harm to others.

  • Fast Track breach?

    What about DYO?

  • Impact of intelligence sharing on likelihood of breach?

  • Enforcement in a DYO environment and managing different expectations?

    What about vulnerable young people?

  • Risks of losing contact/mispers etc

  • Ongoing engagement

  • Safeguarding issues


The yro and breach 1

The YRO and breach (1)

The legislation – CJ&I Act 2008

  • A young person is in breach of their YRO if they have failed without reasonable excuse to comply with any requirement in their order on three separate occasions within a 12 month ‘warned period’, which begins on the date of the first warning.

  • There is a presumption in favour of referring the matter back to court after a third failure to comply and a discretionary power to do so after the second failure to comply

  • Key points:

    • Determining reasonable excuse

    • Breach of any requirement is a breach of the order

    • 12 month warned period (begins on date of first warning)


The yro and breach 2

The YRO and breach (2)

  • If no reasonable excuse for non-compliance must issue first warning in writing (start of warned period) describing:

    • The circumstances of the failure to comply

    • A statement that the failure is not acceptable

    • A warning that a further failure to comply may lead to the order being referred back to the court.

  • Can refer case back to court at any time where a significant issue has taken place

  • YOT Manager can stay court action if appropriate


Courts role in enforcement 1

Courts role in enforcement (1)

  • Court is not obliged to make any order but may allow the YRO to continue

  • No obligation on the court to make an order more onerous (SGC)

  • Options available to court:

    • No action:

    • impose a fine

    • amend the terms of the order; or

    • revoke the order and re-sentence the offender


Options available to court

Options available to court:

  • No action: YRO continues -can be used to ‘mark the breach’

  • impose a fine (in which case the order continues in its original form);

  • Amending terms - may impose any requirement available when making the order either in addition to, or in substitution for, any requirements

    • If YRO did not contain an unpaid work the minimum period is 20 hours

  • Revoke and Re-sentence - May not amend the terms of a YRO that did not include ISS or IF by inserting them at this stage; the offender must be re-sentenced and the original YRO revoked.


Breach reports

Breach Reports

  • Are you a half glass full or half glass empty when it come to breach?

  • National Standards state that YOTs should ensure that they have in place mechanisms to enable young people to comply

  • Consider a balanced approach where possible:

    • Detail what the young person has complied well with

    • Outline what they have not complied with and based on your assessment with the young person why this is

    • Propose how you and the young person will work to ensure successful completion of the order

    • Make it outcome focussed


Activity breach

20 mins

Activity - Breach

  • You will find a timeline and questions in your packs

  • Consider the questions and discuss the answers in your groups

  • Your table facilitator will be at hand to advise


Revoking and amending

Revoking and Amending

Revocation of a YRO

  • YRO’s can be revoked on the grounds of good progress/responding well to treatment – on the application of responsible officer (if unsuccessful then no further application for three months).

    Amendment of a YRO

  • YRO’s can be amended on the application of the responsible officer.

  • Why?

    • If the yp moves area then the responsible officer can apply to have the court area changed.

    • Remove an existing requirement if it is no longer required/appropriate.

    • Replace a requirement with another requirement that was available at sentencing.


Case study revocation and amendment

15 mins

Case study – revocation and amendment

  • Consider the update provided on Stefan and have a group discussion on next steps


Key learning8

Key Learning

Guidance

  • National Standards

  • Case Management Guidance

  • KEEP - Engaging Young People who Offend and APIS

    Key Messages

  • Introduction of the warned period

  • Key consideration for YOT manager to stay breach

  • Examine your local success around enforcement and compliance? How can we improve our services?


Pre implementation feedback and consolidation approach

Pre Implementation FeedbackandConsolidation Approach


Pre implementation feedback

Pre-Implementation feedback

147 responses at time slide compiled (93.6%)

Key initial messages

Operating a formal risk-based approach

37% YOTs said NO

Have you the necessary information to implement the Scaled Approach

25% YOTs said NO


Implementation the challenge

Implementation – the challenge

Do you believe staff understand the implications and cultural changes required to implement the Scaled Approach?

Practitioners NO 38%

Administrative staff NO66%

Community Panel Members NO 51%


Engagement

Engagement

Is the Management Board aware?

YES 81%

Does the court understand the Scaled Approach?

YES65%

How long will it take to embed practice?

8 months (the average)


Your support needs

Your support needs

Mainly good news

  • Over 80% respondents said they have been provided with enough support across all areas

  • However, 10% considered that they did not have enough information or that centrally produced information (toolkits, slide decks etc) were inadequate.


Post implementation approach from implementation to consolidation

Post Implementation approachFrom implementation to consolidation


Scaled approach roles and responsibilities

Scaled Approach roles and responsibilities

Central Implementation team

REVISED ROLE

Wales & Regional YRO & Scaled Approach Leads

REVISED ROLE

YOT Management Boards,

YOT Officers

YOT YRO & Scaled Approach Leads

REVISED ROLE


The role of the central implementation team

The role of the Central Implementation Team

  • Continuation of existing support arrangements (unless you tell us something isn’t working!)

  • Design and development of consolidation tools for YOT partnerships and Wales / regional teams

  • Advice and assistance to Wales and regional leads

  • Pro-active and reactive support to YOT partnerships in conjunction with Wales / regional leads

  • Information and query management


Consolidation approach

Consolidation approach

Upfront planning, based on judgement, impact, knowledge of business, number of cases

Support delivered

during implementation

Pro-active Support

43 YOTs approached

17 YOTs accepted

STANDARD SUPPORT

157 YOTs

Tools, materials,

advice

Reactive Support

Responding to support requests, answering inbox queries, support to regions

Request for assistance from YOTs


Scaled approach and yro yot briefing events

STANDARD

Consolidation

  • YOT consolidation schedule

    • Revised Scaled Approach lead role

    • Consolidation group terms of reference

    • Indicators of embedded practice

    • Quality assurance and service development

    • Benefits measurement and management reporting

    • Partnership working and ongoing work with Courts

  • Tool sets

And regional support as normal!


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