AGEING IN A FOREIGN LAND: “CAN YOU HEAR MY VOICE”?
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AGEING IN A FOREIGN LAND: “CAN YOU HEAR MY VOICE”? OR WE ARE NOT SPEAKING THE SAME LANGUAGE BUT WE CAN STILL UNDERSTAND EACH OTHER IF WE ARE ‘’LISTENING”. SUMMARY. INTRODUCTION –CREATION OF A TEAM-IIMPORTANCE OF HUMANITIES DEMOGRAPHICS 2009 LITERATURE REVIEW PILOT PROGECT 2010

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Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

AGEING IN A FOREIGN LAND: “CAN YOU HEAR MY VOICE”?

OR

WE ARE NOT SPEAKING THE SAME LANGUAGE BUT WE CAN STILL UNDERSTAND EACH OTHER IF WE ARE ‘’LISTENING”


Summary

SUMMARY

INTRODUCTION –CREATION OF A TEAM-IIMPORTANCE OF HUMANITIES

DEMOGRAPHICS

2009 LITERATURE REVIEW

PILOT PROGECT 2010

1tst INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: 2011

COUNCIL’S PROJECT

2nd INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: 2013

CONCLUSION


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

http://cruiselinehistory.com/?p=4371

www.syndesmos.net

http://www.immitoaustralia.com/Immigration_History_of_Australia


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

INTRODUCTION


2008 why start the research

2008: Why start the research?

  • Anecdotal evidence from Australian/SA Greek communities

  • Ageing Greek speakers seeking support from people and organisations whose professional mandate is not necessarily aged support for health/social issues

  • eg Greek-speaking community clubs, Greek-speaking MPs, Greek-speaking GPs

  • A research from cultural/linguistic perspective


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

The Project Team @ Flinders

Prof Michael Tsianikas – Modern Greek (Dept of Languages)Ms Mary Skaltsas – Modern Greek (Dept of Languages)Dr Lareen Newman – Southgate InstituteDr Ruth Walker – SA Community Health Research UnitMs Catherine Hurley – SA Community Health Research UnitMs Georgia Panagiotopoulos – Research Assistant Dr Brodie Beales – Migrant & Refugee Research Cluster


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

THE IMPORTANCE OF HUMANITIES

It is not about statistics only

It is about THE language

It is about the concepts

It is about the culture

It is about awareness, self education, engagement

It is about the history of cultures

EXAMPLES


Challenges

Challenges

Interdisciplinary collaboration and the importance of humanities

Towards a holistic approach through an inter-generational engagement and cultural understanding

The importance to allow aged people to articulate/practice their voices


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

STATISTICS


Australian statistics 2006 from country of birth of person by age

Australian Statistics – 2006From Country of Birth of Person by Age

Greeks 55+

Greek Males 36,307

Greek Females 38,367

Total Greek 74,674 1.61% (all Australians)

Melbourne 38,041 2.88

Adelaide 7,502 1.66


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

Age 70-79

Age 50-59

Government of South Australia (2009). Cultural & Linguistic Diversity amongst Older People in SA: A Demographic Overview. Office for the Ageing.


Greek language

Greek language

Some statistics:

In 1996: 269.775 individuals were using the language to communicate at home

In 2001: 263.222

In 2006: 252,226.

Greek is the fourth important language after: English (15.581.313), Chinese (465.153), and Italian (316.895).


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

Reviewing the literature 2009


Reviewing the literature 2009

Reviewing the literature 2009

Main search October-December 2009

330 items returned “somewhat relevant”

38 items eventually included for review

Ageing + NESB/CALD: 35 items

Ageing + Greeks: 3 (2 journal articles Aust; 1 book Vic)


Review findings

Review findings

Scope:

  • Research does exist on CALD ageing

  • BUT little on service needs/access for particular CALD communities

  • Very little on Greek-speakers in Australia or SA

    Ageing CALD challenges:

    • Lack of information on health and support services available

    • Problems with access to health and support services

    • Particularly language & cultural barriers

    • Confirmed dependence on certain professionals (especially GPs) to source information about supports and services


Review findings1

Review findings

Research issues:

  • Little research with the ethnic aged in their own language

  • Service research often asks providers but not always users

  • Research methods often include only participants proficient in English.

  • For aged Greek this may limit whose views are represented – may also have literacy issues in native language as many came with limited education


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

Pilot project Adelaide and Darwin 2010


Fieldwork in two council areas

Fieldwork in two council areas

West Torrens

Unley


Method

Method

27 in-depth interviews (22 in Adelaide, 5 in Darwin)

5 focus groups (4 in Adelaide, 1 in Darwin)

Total n=63 older Greek Australians (mean age = 79 years)

Service providers (30 surveys, Adelaide 22, Darwin 8)

Data transcribed and translated into English by research assistant

Qualitative data analysis to generate themes


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

1. Cultures of care still exist but within contemporary parameters: “they look after us” but what this means has changed

“the kids can’t…they want to” (female, focus group participant)

“They can’t help you with everything” (male, focus group participant)

“When the girls can, they come/visit” (male, 88 years)

“Of course we prefer [receiving help] from our children, but they can’t… When our children didn’t have their own families, they helped us” (male, 88 years)


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

2. Boundaries of family care: recognize need to use formal services if health declines

“Later on, it’s possible. If we get worse, without a doubt, we will require [more services]” (male, 84 years)

“If we become unwell we will pay a nurse to come and look after us….If we are really unwell/incapable and need a wheelchair, then we will do whatever our children want us to do. They can sell our house and put us in a nursing home (female, 70 years)


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

3. Unavailability of family due to work commitments

“How many times has (she) said, ‘Mum, I’ll take you to the shops’. But where is she? She has the intention of helping, but she has a family, and she works all day.” (female, 80 years)

“I’m alone at home, you see, I lost my husband 15 years ago, that’s why things are the way they are. The kids are married, they’re at their own houses… It’s safe to say, I need help but I can’t [rely on them] often, they work, they have their own families, and I’m alone. I don’t know the language, English, I don’t know…You see my daughter works. My son lives far away, and even he can’t now, he also pays for a cleaner… His wife works, she gets tired… And I can’t even go and help my son”. (female, 78 years)


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

4. Recognition that dependence on children could make ageing more difficult

“I think we Greeks have very big expectations of our children, that when we get older they will look after us. Australians don’t have that. That’s what makes us drown, and makes us feel like old age is worse. Because of this expectation of our children, it makes us feel worse. Everyone feels burned because their child brought them there [to a nursing home]..” (female, focus group participant)


Family as conduit to services

Family as conduit to services

  • All participants saw the need to access/engage with formal support through children or family

    “My daughter, she’s the one who fills [the forms] in. Who else?” (female, 71 years)

  • Lack of English was seen as major barrier to sourcing support independently

    “We suffer because we don’t know English, but with kids, it’s easier” (male, focus group participant)


Independent yet dependent

Independent yet dependent

Contrary to belief that older migrants resist formal services, about half were accessing formal services for instrumental support (both couples and widows)

Most manage independently but with belief family will assist if urgent or important

“[They have their] work, and children…I call if I need

something, and they will run” (female, 84 years)

“….if we needed something in an emergency, they would help us” (male, 88 years)


Main cultural outcomes

Main Cultural Outcomes

The importance for aged people to “hear” Greek words

Greek associations are closing doors

The importance of family support and related issues

Cultural and demographic shifts in 2nd/3rd generation

The “language” issue and cultural understanding (e.g.: what is a “service?”)

What is “ageing positively”/ “active ageing”?

Volunteering

The role of churches

Women’s case

Abuses

Human rights


Attending conferences publishing

Attending Conferences/ publishing

The Team delivered six paper for conferences

4 publications


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

Applying for ARC Linkage Grant, 2011

“Investigating the interplay between family and formal services for Australia's ageing migrants”


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

1st International Conference at Flinders and “Ageing in the Migrant Diaspora”


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

2012: A NEW PROJECT


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

“Lost in Translation? Investigating the Linguistic and Conceptual Understanding of Translated Text for the Aged People of Greek Background”The project will examine local South Australian Council material in the form of brochures, pamphlets and booklets, that are translated into the Greek language on the services available for the aged population of Greek background.


Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

Aim

The purpose of the study is to investigate whether:

English documents are translated into the Greek language,

Greek translations are understood amongst the elderly Greek population,

Concepts in the English language provide meaning in the Greek language, and

The consistency and best utilisation of resources amongst the South Australian councils regarding Greek aged care translated information.


Method1

Method

  • Council material

    • 47 letters posted

    • 22 responses

  • Interviews

    • Interview Pool

      • 25 participants

      • Greek-born or Greek-Cypriot background

      • Age 65+

        Recruitment: Community groups and snowballing


  • Method2

    Method

    • Council material

      • 47 letters posted

      • 12 responses

  • Interviews

    • Interview Pool

      • 25 participants

      • Greek-born or Greek-Cypriot background

      • Age 65+

        Recruitment: Community groups and snowballing


  • Analysis

    Analysis

    • Advocacy

      • The Adelaide City Council: Greek pamphlet Aged Rights Advocacy Services (ARAS), which is by a South Australian component of the National Aged Care Advocacy Program, provides a local and toll free number. (ARAS is funded by the Department of Health and Ageing and the Home and Community Care Program, Department for Families and Communities.)

      • The City of West Torrens: Greek pamphlet Aged Care Investigations Complaints Services is the Federal Government.

      • The City of Salisbury: Greek leaflet of services and mention Aged Rights Advocacy Services (but written in Greek differently). There is no cross reference.

      • The City of Charles Sturt: Greek pamphlet Access to Services Rights and Responsibilities (in Greek) gives information on services of four organisation - Aged Rights Advocacy Services (ARAS), Disability Complaints Service, Multicultural Advocacy and Liaison Services of South Australia (MALSSA)and Ethnic Link. Please note: they do not explain what these services do for individuals.

      • The City of Port Adelaide Enfield: Greek pamphlet on Ethnic Link from the Uniting Care Wesley that explains the services and facilities. It has a local number and a free call national number. They are the only Council with this pamphlet.

      • The City of Port Adelaide Enfield: Greek pamphlet on the Alliance for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (APEA), gives information on numerous services of advocacy that do not appear in other leaflet. They utilises clear statement words that are attention grabbing with a strong impact. They are again the only Council with this pamphlet.


    Findings

    Findings

    • Information

      • Variations in the translation

      • Inconsistency of documents

      • No material available

      • No cross-councils collaboration

      • Not effective use of resources

  • Interviews

    Level of understanding meaning and concepts of translated material


  • Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

    2013

    2ND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON AEGING


    Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

    CONCLUSION


    Ageing in a foreign land can you hear my voice or

    π.ο., 1989 πόεμ

    Sorri,

    Not to tok

    To yoo

    Propa-wai

    but

    evriboti

    mewth hev: Tok!

    Iz da

    stori ov da

    layf.

    (Fitzroy Poems)


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