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Titles/ authors. DISCUSSION LEADER EXAMPLE. TITLE of ESSAY. Include a subtitle that b riefly s ummarizes the m ain point o f the essay. About the author. Author’s name Relevant education or professional b ackground information Other publication credits

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Titles authors

Titles/authors

DISCUSSION

LEADER

EXAMPLE


Title of essay

TITLE of ESSAY

Include a

subtitle

that

briefly

summarizes

the

main point

of the essay


About the author

About the author

  • Author’s name

    • Relevant education or professional

      background information

    • Other publication credits

    • Relevant professional connections

      with organizations, govt. bodies, etc.

PHOTO of AUTHOR


Rhetorical context

Rhetorical Context

  • Select an image to help your classmates identify with the subject of the reading

  • Give them relevant background about the subject: Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?

  • Give them relevant background about the piece itself: when was it written? Who published it?


Content essay

Content: ESSAY

  • Summarize the essay

  • Identify the main points, themes, and/or arguments of the essay

  • Select specific anecdotes or quotations that you found particularly intriguing or engaging; denote pages #s so your classmates can find them

  • Identify major statistics or facts that classmates should note


Rhetorical strategies essay

Rhetorical Strategies: ESSAY

  • Identify ideas, quotations, anecdotes, images, or underlying themes that present rhetorical strategies like:

    • Credibility of author/sources/subject matter

    • Pathos: appeals to the emotions of a reader

    • Logos: logical/factual arguments for the reader

    • Ethos: ethical, moral, or “should/should not” arguments

  • Identify fallacies or problematic areas of the essay

    • Is there any bias in this essay?

    • Is the author guilty of using weak language, fear-tactics, or generalized argument?

    • What possible rebuttals, or counterarguments, could be made?


Discussion questions essay

Discussion Questions: ESSAY

Formulate questions for your classmates that engage with specific points or anecdotes from the material; make connections with other readings & the Everyday Writer/Envision material, etc.

Allow at least 10 seconds for them to answer! Call on friends or previous groupmates if you’re not getting much response

  • What questions were you left wondering?

  • Were there questions included with the reading, either at the end or within the text? Use those to help you formulate ideas.

  • What aspects of the essay(s) were most effective for you? Which were not effective, or even off-putting?

  • Did you agree with the author about the subject before reading it? Did you agree with the author afterward? If you changed your mind, why do you think that happened?

  • Were there elements of the readings from Envision or The Everyday Writer that you saw in the essay(s)?


Connections

Connections

  • Make connections to other readings for that particular class period

  • Make connections to other class periods’ readings, photo essays, discussion points – in or out of class!


Example the bp cover up

Example: The BP Cover-up

Impacts

&

Issues

with

Off-shore Drilling

“BP and the government say the spill is fast disappearing – but dramatic new science reveals that its worst effects may be yet to come.”


About the author1

About the author

Julia Whitty

  • Writer, documentary filmmaker

  • Awards include: PEN USA Literary

    Award, the John Burroughs Medal,

    finalist for the Dayton Literary

    Peace Prize

  • Mother Jones environmental

    correspondent


The bp cover up rhetorical context

The Bp Cover-Up: Rhetorical Context

  • British Petroleum offshore oil rig Deepwater Horizon explosion, disaster from April – July 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico

  • 35,000-60,000, barrels of oil (40% methane) were being pumped into the Gulf of Mexico daily

  • Methane creates blooms of microbes that absorb the oxygen in the water, taking away the main life ingredient to all organisms living in the Gulf of Mexico, creating anoxic zones

  • “Corexit” pumped into the oil in the extraction process causing a lot of the oil to stay submerged in the sea floor

  • “The BP Cover-Up” published Sept/Oct 2010 issue of Mother Jones


The bp cover up content

The BP Cover-Up: Content

  • BP makes “oil-spill plan” – document which features inaccurate wildlife (i.e. walruses) & a dead “on call expert”

  • BP employs environmental/biochemical scientists with lucrative pay

  • Out-of-work Gulf residents (i.e. fishermen, captains); clean-up crews witnessed “watching movies”

  • “From the outset, BP has fought to control…”(8)

  • BP “pacifies” Gulf residents with payments –

    “They have to pay these guys to work or else they’ll riot”(9)


The bp cover up content ii

The BP Cover Up – Content II

  • Destruction of habitats – Barataria Bay (6), the Pinnacles (13), bathypelagic regions (5)

  • Drilling fluids, the “Top Kill” plan & Corexit(10)

  • Long-term impacts (7) on photosynthesis, phytoplankton, water quality, fisheries (11-12), migrating reptiles & marine mammals, Gulf residents’ health, economy (8-9)


The bp cover up rhetorical strategies

The BP Cover-Up: Rhetorical Strategies

  • Inclusion of experts, locals: Rick Steiner, conservation specialist from University of Alaska/Exxon Valdez; Carl Safina, marine conservationist; David Valentine, biogeochemist at UC Santa Barbara; Cajun oysterman Flip Tayamen

  • Intensive logos appeals: spill statistics, biogeochemical effects, marine ecological explanations; “Death by oil…”(8)

  • Pathos in anecdotes and photos of dead/dying wildlife, Gulf residents; “Barataria Bay has become a hospice wilderness…” (7)

  • Ethos narrative: How should BP held accountable for the short-term and long-term effects? Should the United States still allow offshore drilling?


Rhetorical strategies graphic effects

Rhetorical Strategies: Graphic effects


Discussion questions

Discussion Questions

  • British Petroleum is still in business. How do you think they should be held responsible?

  • What other ecological, socio-political, or economics impacts can you imagine have occurred since 2010?

  • Do you think the US should still be allowing offshore drilling activities/development in the Gulf of Mexico?

  • What aspects of Whitty’s essay were most effective for you? Why?

  • What facets of “North Dakota went Boom” do you see in this essay? How does it present a different side of domestic oil production?


Connections1

Connections

  • Other Gulf Coast crises: Hurricane Katrina; “34” etc.

  • The Ecuadorian Amazon Chevron/Texaco case; “Crude”

  • Nydia Velazquez & “brown fields” in New York City


Title of story

TITLE OF STORY

Include a subtitle that briefly summarizes the story


About the author2

About the author

  • Author’s name

    • Relevant biography,

      education or professional

      background information

    • Other publication credits

    • Relevant professional connections

      with organizations, govt. bodies, etc.

PHOTO of AUTHOR


Rhetorical context1

Rhetorical Context

  • Select an image to help your classmates identify with the subject of the story

  • Give them relevant background about the story: Who? What? When? Where? Why? How? Identify the setting, characters, and the main events or conflicts

  • Give them relevant background about the piece itself: when was it written? Who published it?


Content story

CONTENT: STORY

  • Summarize the story

  • Tell the class what environmental issues the story might be representing in fiction form. This is going to take more complex thinking than for the nonfiction.

  • Select specific lines or quotations that you found particularly intriguing or engaging; denote pages #s so your classmates can find them


Rhetorical strategies story

Rhetorical Strategies: STORY

  • Identify ideas, quotations, anecdotes, images, or underlying themes that present rhetorical strategies like:

    • Pathos: appeals to the emotions of a reader

    • Logos: logical/factual arguments for the reader

    • Ethos: ethical, moral, or “should/should not” arguments


Discussion questions story

Discussion Questions: STORY

Formulate questions for your classmates that engage with specific points or anecdotes from the material; make connections with other readings

Allow at least 10 seconds for them to answer! Call on friends or previous groupmates if you’re not getting much response

  • What questions were you left wondering?

  • What aspect(s) of the story was most effective for you? What was not effective, or even off-putting?

  • What can fiction tell us that non-fiction cannot? Vice versa?


Connections2

Connections

  • Make connections to other readings for that particular class period - How did the story connect to the non-fiction essay? What themes, ideas, or arguments are represented in fiction form?

  • Make connections to other class periods’ readings, photo essays, discussion points – in or out of class!


Photos from oil reaches louisiana shores

Photos from “Oil Reaches Louisiana Shores”

Major themes,

ideas,

or

arguments?


Photos from oil reaches louisiana shores1

Photos from “Oil Reaches Louisiana Shores”

If there is a photo essay for your discussion group, select a few images to discuss with your classmates. Be prepared to talk about why you picked them, how you can connect them with the readings, etc.


Photos from oil reaches louisiana shores2

Photos from “Oil Reaches Louisiana Shores”

Include discussion questions with the photos on your slides so your classmates can respond to the images with thoughts.


Photos from oil reaches louisiana shores3

Photos from “Oil reaches Louisiana Shores”


Other photos

Other Photos?

Ask your classmates to identify the photos from the essay that were most striking for them.

  • Which photos were particularly effective, disturbing/upsetting, or intriguing for you?

  • How did you connect these photos to other readings for class?


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