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Tuesday – AB. Morning (Part 1) Developing Understanding of the Derivative Upload TI 84 Programs Break Morning (Part 2) Ideas That Can Be Explored Before Working with Formulas Connecting Graphs of f, f’, and f” Connecting Differentiability with Continuity Local Linearity. Lunch

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Tuesday – AB

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Tuesday ab

Tuesday – AB

  • Morning (Part 1)

    • Developing Understanding of the Derivative

    • Upload TI 84 Programs

  • Break

  • Morning (Part 2)

    • Ideas That Can Be Explored Before Working with Formulas

    • Connecting Graphs of f, f’, and f”

    • Connecting Differentiability with Continuity

    • Local Linearity

  • Lunch

  • Afternoon (Part 1)

    • Share an Activity

    • Calculus Games

    • Discussion of Homework Problems

  • Break

  • Afternoon (Part 2)

    • Slope Fields

    • Reasoning with Tabular Data


Tuesday assignment ab

Tuesday Assignment - AB

  • Multiple Choice Questions on the 2013 test: 3, 6, 8, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, 21, 23, 28, 76, 78, 82, 84

  • Free Response:

  • 2014: AB2, AB3/BC3

  • 2013: AB3


Tuesday ab bc

Tuesday-AB/BC

  • Morning (Part 1)

    • Developing Understanding of the Derivative

    • Upload TI 84 Programs

  • Break

  • Morning (Part 2)

  • AB:

    • Ideas That Can Be Explored Before Working with Formulas

    • Connecting Graphs of f, f’, and f”

    • Connecting Differentiability with Continuity

    • Local Linearity

    • Derivative “Lesson”

  • BC:

    • Connecting Graphs of f, f’, and f”

    • Series

  • Lunch

  • Afternoon (Part 1)

    • Share an Activity

    • Discussion of Homework Problems

  • Break

  • Afternoon (Part 2)

  • AB:

    • Slope Fields

    • Reasoning with Tabular Data

  • BC:

    • Series


Tuesday assignment ab bc

Tuesday Assignment – AB/BC

  • Multiple Choice Questions on the 2013 test: 3, 6, 8, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, 21, 23, 28, 76, 78, 82, 84

  • Free Response for AB Track

  • 2014: AB2, AB3/BC3

  • 2013: AB3

  • Free Response for BC Track

  • 2014: AB3/BC3, BC2

  • 2013: BC3


Tuesday files

Tuesday Files

  • The Derivative

  • Understanding the Derivative Graphically

  • Understanding the Derivative Numerically

  • A Function and Its Derivative

  • Connecting Graphs of f and f ’ and Descriptions

  • Connecting Continuity and Differentiability

  • Local Linearity

  • How f ’(a) fails to Exist

  • Derivative Lesson

  • Homework Discussion

  • Slope Fields

  • Reasoning with Tabular Data


Tuesday ab

Topics listed in the course description relating to the introduction of the derivative and the definition of the derivative are:


Tuesday ab

  • Presenting the derivative numerically, graphically, and analytically

  • The derivative as an instantaneous rate of change, the limit of the average rate of change (day 1)

  • The definition of derivative as the limit of a difference quotient

  • The slope of a curve at a point, vertical tangents, points where there are no tangents


Numerical approach

Numerical Approach

  • Students should explore understanding the forward difference quotient, the backwards difference quotient, and the symmetric difference quotient


Tuesday ab

Forward Difference Quotient


Tuesday ab

Backward Difference Quotient


Tuesday ab

Symmetric Difference Quotient


Tuesday ab

All lead to the derivative of a function at a point x=a.

Activities with the graphing calculator can numerically and graphically develop understanding for the algebraic approach.


Understanding the derivative numerically using difference quotients

Understanding The Derivative Numerically Using Difference Quotients


Understanding the derivative graphically using difference quotients

Understanding The Derivative Graphically Using Difference Quotients


Tuesday ab

or


Tuesday ab

  • The values of a derivative are not random. They are values of a function defined by

  • As we saw in the first two activities this limit defines a function of x, not a number.


Example

Example

Do you see how this relates to the activity we did on the difference quotients?


Tuesday ab

Building upon these activities it is now appropriate to explore the analytical approach to the definition of a derivative


Tuesday ab

  • You may want to go on and learn other properties of the derivative and uses of the derivative before you actually derive the formulas for the derivatives.

  • Once you get into the formulas that’s where the emphasis will be and not on the concept.


Making observations about the function and its derivative

Making Observations about the Function and Its Derivative

When y1 is increasing, what do you notice about the values of y2?

When y1 is decreasing, what do you notice about the values of y2?

When y1 reaches a maximum, what do you notice about the value of y2?


Tuesday ab

Making Observations about the Function and Its Derivative

When y2 is equal to zero, what do you notice about the behavior of y1?

Would you describe y1 as concave down or concave up? How would you describe the slope of y2?


Ideas that can be explored without the knowing derivative formulas

Using any of the difference quotients (with small h values)obtain graphical (and sometimes numerical)information that can be generalized.

Ideas That Can Be Explored Without the Knowing Derivative Formulas

The graph of f ’

using the difference

quotient with f

The graph of f “

using the difference

quotient with f ‘

The graph of f


Tuesday ab

Notice that

  • when the derivative of f is positive the original function f is increasing and tangent lines to f have positive slopes

  • when the derivative of f is negative the original function f is decreasing and tangent lines to f have negative slopes

  • when the derivative of f is zero after being positive and then negative the original function f has reached a minimum;

  • when the derivative of f is zero after being negative and then positive the original function f has reached a maximum. ;

  • The slope of a tangent line to f at a maximum or minimum is zero.


Tuesday ab

  • If the derivative of f is positive and decreasing the slope of the original function f must be decreasing (or f is concave down)

  • If the derivative of f is negative and increasing the slope of the original function f must be increasing or (or f is concave up)

  • A minimum of f occurs when the derivative of f goes from negative to positive; A maximum of f occurs when the derivative of f goes from positive to negative


Tuesday ab

  • When the sign changes on the second derivative of f the concavity of f is changing and a point of inflection of f has been located

  • Differentiability of f implies Continuity of f but continuity of f does not imply differentiability of f.


Tuesday ab

Extreme Value Theorem

  • A function f, continuous on a closed interval, must have both an absolute minimum and maximum value

  • The location for an extrema is found where the function changes from increasing to decreasing or visa versa

  • We also need to check the value at either endpoint


Tuesday ab

  • A derivative of a derivative is the second derivative

  • The 2nd derivative provides the same information about the first derivative that the first derivative provides about the function

  • When the second derivative of a function is positive-the first derivative of the function is increasing –the slope is getting steeper


Concavity

Concavity

  • A function f is concave up if

    • f’ is increasing

    • f” is positive or

    • A tangent line to f lies below the graph(except at the point of tangency)


Concavity1

Concavity

  • A function f is concave down if

    • f’ is decreasing

    • f” is negative or

    • A tangent line of f lies above the graph(except at the point of tangency)

  • Concavity is defined on an interval not at a point


A point of inflection

A Point of Inflection

  • A point where the second derivative of a function (f”) changes sign (therefore changing the concavity of function f) is called a point of inflection

  • First find where the second derivative (f”) is zero or undefined. Check on both sides of that point to see if the second derivative (f”) changes sign

  • Points of inflection correspond to the extreme values of the first derivative (f’) equal zero.


Remember

Remember

  • Functions are not differentiable at the endpoints of a closed interval.

    • The limit only exists from one side


Connecting graphs of f f and descriptions

Connecting Graphs of f, f’ and descriptions

Match graphs of f, f ‘ and descriptions of f and f’


Connecting continuity and differentiability

Connecting Continuity and Differentiability

  • Because a limit is used to define the derivative

    • If the derivative exists at a point, the function is continuous at that point

  • Differentiability implies continuity

    • If a function is differentiable at a point, it is continuous there

    • If a function is differentiable on an interval, it is continuous on the interval


Is a continuous function differentiable is a differentiable function continuous

Is a continuous function differentiable?Is a differentiable function continuous?


Local linearity

Local Linearity

  • Local linearity is a property of differentiable functions that says – roughly – that if you zoom in on a point on the graph of the function (with equal scaling horizontally and vertically), the graph will eventually look like a straight line with a slope equal to the derivative of the function at that point.

  • Local linearity is the graphical approach to the derivative


Tuesday ab

  • Functions that are differentiable are locally linear, and, conversely, functions that are locally linear are differentiable.

  • Unfortunately, there is not sure way of determining whether a function is locally linear until you know if it’s differentiable.

  • Locally linear is a good, informal, way to introduce the concept of the derivative and to let your students see what differentiable means.


Tuesday ab

  • Local linearity and the secant line approximations can be explored in precalculus without reference to differentiability.

  • Local linearity can be introduced through zooming out and zooming in

  • Differentiable functions are smoothFunctions that are not differentiable have sharp bends or discontinuities in them


Introduction to local linearity

Introduction to Local Linearity

Write a rule for each of the three lines. Give justification for why you

wrote each equation.

J.T. Sutcliff


Tuesday ab

  • Which line is


Tuesday ab

  • Enter each of these functions in your graphing calculator in a zoom 4 Decimal window. Record your sketch below


Tuesday ab

  • Zoom in on the origin by resetting the window to [-0.004, 0.004, 0.001, -0.003, 0.003, 0.001].

  • What has happened to each of the graphs when you look at a very small window around the origin?


Tuesday ab

  • We say that a function is locally linear when we can make a curved line appear linear. Each straight line equation that your wrote is called a linear approximation for these graphs at the point x = 0.


Tuesday ab

  • Graph the equation in on a zoom 4 decimal window.

    Zoom in to a small window and write the equation of the line that can be used as the linear approximation for this function atx = 0.


How f a fails to exist

How f’(a) Fails to Exist


Sample differentiation lessons

Sample Differentiation Lessons

  • The Rules for Differentiation

  • Thinking about the Derivative of a Function


Discussion of monday homework

Discussion of Monday Homework


Monday ab

Monday - AB

  • Multiple Choice Questions on the 2013 test: 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 22, 24

  • Free Response:

  • 2014: AB1/BC1, AB6

  • 2013: AB1


Monday ab bc

Monday – AB/BC

  • Multiple Choice Questions on the 2013 test: 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 12, 13,14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 22, 24

  • Free Response for AB Track

  • 2014: AB1/BC1, AB6

  • 2013: AB1

  • Free Response for BC Track

  • 2014: AB1/BC1, BC6

  • 2013: BC1


2014 ab1 bc1

2014 AB1/BC1


Scoring rubric for 2014 ab1 bc1

Scoring Rubric for 2014 AB1/BC1


2014 ab6

2014 AB6


Scoring rubric 2014 ab6

Scoring Rubric 2014 AB6


2013 ab1

2013 AB1


Calculus in motion animation of 2013 ab1

Calculus in MotionAnimation of 2013 AB1


2014 bc6

2014 BC6


Scoring rubric 2014 bc6

Scoring Rubric 2014 BC6


2013 bc1

2013 BC1


Scoring rubric 2013 bc1

Scoring Rubric 2013 BC1


Scoring rubric 2013 bc11

Scoring Rubric 2013 BC1


2013 ab2

2013 AB2


Scoring rubric 2013 ab2

Scoring Rubric 2013 AB2


2013 bc2

2013 BC2


Scoring rubric 2013 bc2

Scoring Rubric 2013 BC2


Slope fields

Slope Fields

  • There are two different types of problems in an AP Calculus course. In one type, you are given a function and then asked about its rate of change; in the other type, you are given how the function changes and then asked to identify the function. Thus derivative and antiderivative permeate the course.


Tuesday ab

  • The term differential equation may seem formidable at first, but since a differential equation is nothing more than an equation that involves a derivative, differential equations occur throughout the course. A solution to a differential equation is simply a function that satisfies the equation.


Introducing the a slope field

Introducing the a Slope Field

  • Most people think that if they are handed a differential equation the task will be to solve it.

  • But what is a differential equation really describing?

  • Students can be asked to describe the behavior or tangent lines based on the differential equation.

  • Introducing Slope Fields (Smartboard)


Tuesday ab

Create a slope field from a differential equation

  • Creating Basic Slope Fields (Smartboard)

Practice Reading Information from a Slope Field

  • Reading Slope Fields

  • Using Technology to Create Slope Fields

Viewing Slope Fields on a TI-84


Nancy stephenson s materials on ap central

Nancy Stephenson’s Materialson AP Central

  • Slope Field Handout

  • Slope Field Card Match


What to include in your study

What to include in your study

Build activities so that student

  • become familiar with the terminology of differential equations

  • recognize what is meant by a solution to a differential equation

  • use differential equations in modeling applications

  • understand the relationship between a slope field and a solution curve for the differential equation


What might students be asked to do

What might students be asked to do

  • verify whether or not a given function is a solution to a differential equation

  • manually construct a portion of a slope field for a given differential equation

  • choose from among many differential equations which one is associated with a given slope field


Tuesday ab

  • Choose from among many slope fields which one is associated with a given differential equation

  • Recognize exponential growth and decay, the governing differential equation and its solution

  • Solve a given separable differential equation


Slope field matching cards

Slope Field Matching Cards


Reasoning with tabular data

Reasoning with Tabular Data

2008 Curriculum Module


Instantaneous rate of change

Instantaneous Rate of Change

Pages 1 and 2

Approximate y’(12) and explain the meaning of y’(12) in terms of the population of the town.


Average value of a function

Average Value of a Function

Pages 1 and 2

Approximate, with a trapezoidal rule, the average population of the town over the 20 years.


Approximate an integral

Approximate an Integral

Pages 3 and 4

Use a midpoint Riemann sum with three subintervals to approximate

Explain the meaning of this definite integral in terms of the water flow, using correct units.


Evaluate an average rate

Evaluate an Average Rate

Pages 4 and 5

Use P(t) to find the average rate of water flow during the 12-hour period. Indicate units of measure.


Approximate a total distance traveled

Approximate a Total Distance Traveled

Pages 5 and 6

Approximate the distance traveled over

Using a right Riemann sum with four intervals.


Tuesday ab

Use P(t) to find the average rate of water flow during the 12-hour time period. Indicate units of measure.


Tuesday ab

Other AP Free Response questions that reference tabular data


Tuesday assignment ab1

Tuesday Assignment - AB

  • Multiple Choice Questions on the 2013 test: 3, 6, 8, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, 21, 23, 28, 76, 78, 82, 84

  • Free Response:

  • 2014: AB2, AB3/BC3

  • 2013: AB3


Tuesday assignment ab bc1

Tuesday Assignment – AB/BC

  • Multiple Choice Questions on the 2013 test: 3, 6, 8, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, 21, 23, 28, 76, 78, 82, 84

  • Free Response for AB Track

  • 2014: AB2, AB3/BC3

  • 2013: AB3

  • Free Response for BC Track

  • 2014: AB3/BC3, BC2

  • 2013: BC3


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