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M.S. Resource Interpretation Non-Thesis Project. NPS Southwest Area (AZ & NM) Fire Communication and Education Strategy & Toolbox By Michelle Fidler Presented April 29, 2008 Advisory committee: Brian P. Oswald, Michael H. Legg, Pat Stephens Williams, Ray Darville

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M s resource interpretation non thesis project
M.S. Resource InterpretationNon-Thesis Project

NPS Southwest Area (AZ & NM)

Fire Communication and Education Strategy & Toolbox

By Michelle Fidler

Presented April 29, 2008

Advisory committee: Brian P. Oswald, Michael H. Legg, Pat Stephens Williams, Ray Darville

Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture, Stephen F. Austin State University


Part 1
Part 1

Fire Communication & Education Strategy


Fire communication education strategy situation analysis

Role of Fire

- SW Forests need fire

- Deserts are damaged by fire

Fire Communication & Education StrategySituation Analysis


Fire communication education strategy situation analysis1

Significant SW Fires

Moccasin Mesa

Dude Fire

Cerro Grande

Rodeo-Chediski

Cave Creek Complex

Fire Communication & Education StrategySituation Analysis


Fire communication education strategy situation analysis2

Role of Fire CommEd

- Increases agency trust and support for fire management activities

Fire Communication & Education StrategySituation Analysis


Fire communication education strategy situation analysis3

Interpretive Connections

Fire size & location

Suppression vs. Resource Benefits

Risks

Manager Responsibility

Effects of Smoke

Fire Effects

Aesthic Impacts

Smokey Bear Message

Use of Fire

Benefits of Fire

Fire Communication & Education StrategySituation Analysis


Fire communication education strategy situation analysis4

Outreach for Residents

Focus on local issues & perceived risks

Fuels reduction

Firewise

Smoke

Windows of Opportunity

Fire Communication & Education StrategySituation Analysis


Communication education strategy objectives
Communication & Education StrategyObjectives

  • Fire communication and education related audience contacts will increase 25% by 2013.

  • Audience knowledge of the role of fire in ecosystems and the management of fire and fuels in the parks will increase 25% by 2013.

  • Audience support for park fire management practices will increase 25% by 2013.

  • Local communities will increase fire mitigation actions in wildland-urban interface areas 25% by 2013.

  • Unplanned human-caused ignitions in parks and neighboring communities will decrease 25% by 2013.


Fire communication education strategy key messages
Fire Communication & Education StrategyKey Messages

Safety

Firefighter and public safety is always our first priority.

We actively manage all fires with the most effective, efficient and safest means available based on predetermined management objectives and analysis of the current situation.

We have a wide array of fire management tools available to us, to apply when, where, and to the degree needed to accomplish our objectives.

Maintaining natural fire cycles in fire-adapted ecosystems helps prevent high-intensity, destructive wildfires that can threaten firefighter and public safety.


Fire communication education strategy key messages1
Fire Communication & Education StrategyKey Messages

Science

The NPS fire management program uses the best available

science to understand and manage ecosystems.

SW forests are fire-adapted and need periodic fire to maintain diverse, healthy habitats.

Desert fires were historically infrequent and small; today invasive species are spreading into the desert, fueling unnaturally large, high-intensity fires that damage desert vegetation and wildlife and threaten firefighter and public safety.

The risks of large fires has increased dramatically in the last century. There is more vegetation to burn and conditions are drier more often.


Fire communication education strategy key messages2
Fire Communication & Education StrategyKey Messages

Stewardship

National Parks are unique, valuable resources that we are

all responsible for caring for.

The NPS incorporates public input and the best available science when making management decisions.

The NPS works with partner agencies and local communities to help mitigate risks in the wildland-urban interface.

Everyone can help prevent careless, human-caused wildfires by practicing outdoor fire safety.


Fire communication education strategy target audiences

Internal

Park Employees

Partner Agencies / Professional Peers

Incident Personnel

External

Park Visitors

Local Communities

Students

Educators

Media

Fire Communication & Education StrategyTarget Audiences


Fire communication education strategy strategies
Fire Communication & Education StrategyStrategies

  • Proactive, year-round outreach

  • Clear, consistent messages

  • Park-specific information

  • Interagency collaboration

  • Accurate, accessible, timely information


Fire communication education strategy tactics

Year-Round

Increased Fire Danger

Prescribed Burn Planning

1-5 Days Before Rx Burn

Upon Ignition

2nd Operational Period

Daily – AM

Daily – Mid-day

Daily – PM

As Needed

Transition

Closeout

Post-Fire

Fire Communication & Education StrategyTactics


Fire communication education strategy staff up staffing
Fire Communication & Education StrategyStaff-Up Staffing

  • Upon Ignition

  • Delegating Responsibilities

  • Ordering an Incident Public Information Officer

  • Ordering Additional Public Information Officers

  • Upon Arrival of an Incident Management Team


Fire communication education strategy evaluation
Fire Communication & Education StrategyEvaluation

  • Outreach Contacts

  • After Action Review

  • Informal Assessments

  • Formal Assessments

  • Rossman & Schlatter’s visual imaging guide


Part 2
Part 2

Fire Communication & Education Toolbox


Fire communication education toolbox part 1 outreach methods

Bulletin Boards

Camp Newsletters

Community Meetings

Community Newsletter

Exhibits

Handouts

Inciweb

Interpretive Programs

Lesson Plans

Multimedia

News Releases

NPS Fire News

Park Website

Public Service Announcements

Signs

Success Stories

Trapline

Fire Communication & Education ToolboxPart 1: Outreach Methods


Fire communication education toolbox part 1 outreach methods1

Community Meetings

The public seeks confirmation of what is already known. Acknowledging “I don’t know” can help build credibility.

People often place more importance on body language than verbal communication. It can provide up to 75% of message content.

It’s important to listen to specific concerns and acknowledge them. Try to use statements of personal concern like, “I can see by the number of people here tonight that you are as concerned about this issue as I am.”

Fire Communication & Education ToolboxPart 1: Outreach Methods


Fire communication education toolbox part 1 outreach methods2

Exhibits

Use a theme that conveys your key message.

The average viewing time for most exhibits is no more than 45 seconds. Most adults read at a rate of about 250-300 words per minute. Thus exhibits should be limited to no more than 225 words.

Add interest to exhibits by making them visual, three-dimensional, or interactive.

Fire Communication & Education ToolboxPart 1: Outreach Methods


Fire communication education toolbox part 1 outreach methods3

News Releases

Take advantage of “windows of opportunity” to promote action while interest is high.

Use quotes to incorporate multiple perspectives.

Address who, what, when, where, why, and how, as well as what to expect and what to do.

Fire Communication & Education ToolboxPart 1: Outreach Methods


Fire communication education toolbox part 2 resources
Fire Communication & Education ToolboxPart 2: Resources

  • Communication Planning

  • Contacts

  • Current Wildland Fire Information

  • Emergency Action Plan

  • Forms and Templates

  • Images

  • Media

  • Public Information Officer Resources

  • Supplies, Materials, and Equipment

  • Talking Points


Fire communication education toolbox part 3 issues

Appropriate Management Response

Equipment

Fire Behavior

Fire Ecology

Evacuations

Firewise

Fuels

Incident Command System

Invasive Species

Personnel

Prevention

Prescribed Fire

Rehabilitation

Restrictions and Closures

Safety

Smoke

Suppression

Weather

Wildland Fire

Wildland Fire Use

Fire Communication & Education ToolboxPart 3: Issues


M s resource interpretation non thesis project1
M.S. Resource InterpretationNon-Thesis Project

Fire Communication and Education Strategy & Toolbox

by Michelle Fidler

Presented April 29, 2008

Advisory committee: Brian P. Oswald, Michael H. Legg, Pat Stephens Williams, Ray Darville

Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture, Stephen F. Austin State University


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