Vehicle versatility an olympic tradition
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Vehicle Versatility: An Olympic Tradition . By: Kevin Uyleman , Tiffany Ng, and Sandy Dos Sanjos. Vehicle Versatility: An Olympic Tradition Group #7 Kevin Uyleman , Sandy dos Anjos , Tiffany Ng Marlborough High School STEM ECHS October 25, 2013. Step 1 Define the Problem.

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Vehicle versatility an olympic tradition

Vehicle Versatility: An Olympic Tradition

By: Kevin Uyleman, Tiffany Ng, and Sandy Dos Sanjos


Vehicle versatility an olympic tradition

Vehicle Versatility: An Olympic Tradition

Group #7

Kevin Uyleman, Sandy dos Anjos, Tiffany Ng

Marlborough High School

STEM ECHS

October 25, 2013


Step 1 define the problem

Step 1Define the Problem

The goals of the project are:

  • To make an egg-carrying device

  • Make it cost efficient

  • Make it safe for the egg

  • Make it float in water

  • Make it fast when it falls

  • Make it accurate when it falls

  • Make it be able to withstand the power of a medicine ball


Step 2 research the problem

Step 2 Research the Problem

The parachute had several designs made by different kinds of people such as Leonardo da Vinci (who used the weight of the jumper) or Jean-Pierre Blanchard (who focused on the safety limits).

Designed by

FaustoVeranzio

Fact: The word parachute was made by combining the two words para- and chute

Para means “Defense against” while chute was French for “Fall.”


Step 2 research the problem1

Step 2Research the problem

The Wright Brothers came up with the designs of many planes and gliders and made many improvements. This led from wooden airplanes to high-powered biplanes.


Step 3 develop possible solutions

Step 3develop possible solutions

The egg could be held in a carton cell and placed in a Styrofoam cup. A Styrofoam bowl could act as a roof to prevent the egg from falling out, it would taped from the inside of the bowl to the inside of the cup. Also, a trash bag parachute to slow it down during the air challenge.


Step 3 develop possible solutions1

Step 3develop possible solutions

Rubber bands can take a large amount of force. So we could cut out the bottom of the cup and glue 5-6 rubber bands both sides of the bottom of the cup.


Step 3 develop possible solutions2

Step 3develop possible solutions

The egg could be held in place buy string on all sides. Also, a wooden base could protect the egg from the air challenge and water challenge; it will also help the device float.


Step 4 pick the best possible solution

Step 4pick the best possible solution

We decided to go with these design ideas:

  • Styrofoam Cup with a Styrofoam Bowl over it

  • Trash bag parachute

  • Wooden base

  • Rubber bands to cushion the blow in the air challenge


Step 5 create a prototype

Step 5Create A prototype


Step 5 create a prototype1

Step 5Create A prototype

Procedure:

  • Place an egg carton cell inside of a cup. (on the bottom)

  • Tape the egg carton cell to the cup from the indie of the cup with duct tape.

  • Place a Styrofoam cup on top of a Styrofoam bowl.

  • Tape the Styrofoam cup to the Styrofoam bowl from the inside of the cup with duct tape.

  • Cut out a hole out of the bottom of the cup.

  • Stretch a rubber band tightly and on both sides of the cup and glue both sides of the rubber bands tot the cup.


Step 5 create a prototype2

Step 5Create a PROTOTYPE

Procedure (cont.):

  • Repeat step 6 four more times and cover the entire bottom of the cup with stretched rubber bands.

  • Stretch another rubber band tightly and hold it down to the cup the opposite two directions you did with the first 3 rubber bands

  • Cut 2 pieces of the wooden plank and make the length of them be

    3 ½ inches.

  • Tape the 2 pieces of 3 ½ inch wood together at the center of both wooden planks. Tape them all of the way around.

  • Cut two more pieces of wood and make the length of them be 1 inch.

  • Cut two more pieces of wood and make the length of them ½ inches.


Step 5 create a prototype3

Step 5Create a prototype

Procedure (cont.):

  • Glue the 2 1 ½ inch wooden planks to the two wooden planks that are taped. Glue them right next to where you taped the wooden planks. Do this on both sides of the tape.

  • Glue the two ½ inch wooden planks onto the two 1 ½ inch wooden planks. Glue the two ½ inch wooden planks on the inside of the two 1 ½ wooden planks. (The inside is the closest to the tape)

  • Glue the two ½ inch wooden planks to the bottom of the cup.

  • Tape the trash bag to the cup by placing tape on opposite sides of the cup and opposite sides of the trash bag


Vehicle versatility an olympic tradition

Isometric Drawing


Step 6 test and evaluate

Step 6test and evaluate

Water Challenge

Goals:

  • Make the vehicle float for 2 minutes

  • Keep the egg safe


Step 6 test and evaluate1

Step 6Test and Evaluate

Water Challenge

Results:

  • Sank

  • Floated for 1.60 seconds


Step 6 test and evaluate2

Step 6Test and evaluate

Air Challenge

Goals:

  • Make the vehicle land as close to a target as possible

  • Make the vehicle as fast a possible

  • Prevent the egg from cracking


Step 6 test and evaluate3

Step 6Test and evaluate

Air Challenge

Results:

  • Landed 0.51 meters from the target

  • Fell to the ground in 1.59 seconds (avg. speed-15.66m/s)

  • Egg cracked


Step 6 test and evaluate4

Step 6Test and evaluate

Land Challenge

Goals:

  • Keep the egg from cracking

  • Prevent the device from breaking


Step 6 test and evaluate5

Step 6Test and Evaluate

Land Challenge

Results:

  • Egg did not crack

  • Device broke


Vehicle versatility an olympic tradition

Water Challenge


Vehicle versatility an olympic tradition

Air Challenge


Vehicle versatility an olympic tradition

Land Challenge


Step 8 redesign

Step 8redesign

Ideas that could have made our design better:

  • Building a wooden plank platform to help the device float

  • Cutting the trash bag

  • Add a wooden barrier to protect the device from the medicine ball


Any questions

Any QUESTIONS?


Reference

reference

  • Acceleration. (n.d.). Retrieved September 17, 2013, from http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/acca.html

  • B. (2011, December 10). Stretching Out For Effectiveness [Stretching a rubber band]. Retrieved from http://www.cells-church.com/tag/john-maxwell/

  • History of aviation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (2013, August 29). Retrieved September 17, 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_aviation#Modern_flight

  • History of the Airplane. (2010). Retrieved September 16, 2013, from http://www.wright-brothers.org/History_Wing/History_of_the_Airplane/History_of_the_Airplane_Intro/History_of_the_Airplane_Intro.htm

  • History of the First Airplane. (2009). Retrieved September 16, 2013, from http://www.firstflightcentennial.org/history-of-the-first-airplane/

  • Ritter, L. (2010, May). Pack Man | History of Flight | Air & Space Magazine. Retrieved September 30, 2013, from http://www.airspacemag.com/history-of-flight/Pack-Man-.html

  • [SPAD XIII biplane at Hicks Field]. Retrieved from http://www.cells-church.com/tag/john-maxwell/

  • Spangler, S. (n.d.). Amazing Egg Experiments | Experiments | Steve Spangler Science. Retrieved September 30, 2013, from http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments/amazing-egg


Reference cont

Reference (cont.)

  • The first trace of parachute in 1470 [First Trace of the parachute]. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.321chutelibre.fr/fr/content/96-parachute-1

  • What is Weight? (n.d.). Retrieved September 17, 2013, from http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/k-12/airplane/weight1.htm


Thank you

Thank You


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