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Devil physics The baddest class on campus Pre-DP Physics. SC.912.P.12.2: Analyze the motion of an object in terms of its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time. Giancoli Chapter 2: Describing motion: kinematics in one dimension.

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Devil physics the baddest class on campus pre dp physics

Devil physicsThe baddest class on campusPre-DP Physics


Giancoli chapter 2 describing motion kinematics in one dimension

SC.912.P.12.2: Analyze the motion of an object in terms of its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

Giancoli Chapter 2: Describing motion: kinematics in one dimension


2 1 reference frames and displacement 2 2 average velocity 2 3 instantaneous velocity

2-1: Reference Frames and Displacement its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

2-2: Average Velocity

2-3: Instantaneous Velocity

Giancoli Chapter 2: Describing motion: kinematics in one dimension


Objectives
Objectives its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Know the meaning of the terms mechanics, kinematics and dynamics

  • Know the difference between distance and displacement and how to measure each

  • Know the difference between average speed and average velocity

  • Understand the concept of instantaneous velocity


Objectives1
Objectives its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Calculate average speed for a given distance and time

  • Calculate average velocity for a given displacement and time


Introductory video displacement velocity and acceleration
Introductory Video: Displacement, Velocity and Acceleration its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.


Mechanics
Mechanics its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • The study of the motion of objects and the related concepts of force and energy.

  • Galileo Galilee (1564-1642)

  • Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727)

  • Building blocks of all areas of modern physics


Mechanics1
Mechanics its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Two major divisions:

    • Kinematics: description of how things move

    • Dynamics: force and why things move the way they do

  • Chapters 2 and 3 deal with kinematics


Translational motion
Translational Motion its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Objects that move without rotating

  • Moves along a straight-line path

  • One-dimensional motion


Translational motion1
Translational Motion its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.


Translational motion2
Translational Motion its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.


Frame of reference
Frame of Reference its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • The point from which you are viewing something

  • The point from which you are measuring something

  • We normally place a set of coordinate axes (a coordinate plane) with the origin resting on the reference point


Distance vs displacement
Distance vs. Displacement its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Distance: measurement of the entire length travelled without respect to direction

  • Displacement: change in position of an object, or, how far the object is from its original position and in what direction

    • Includes both magnitude and direction


Distance vs displacement1
Distance vs. Displacement its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Pike’s Peak Marathon

Pikes Peak

14,110 ft

7,610 ft

1.44 mi

Manitou Springs

6,500 ft


Distance vs displacement2
Distance vs. Displacement its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Pike’s Peak Marathon

    Distance: 14.1 mi

Pikes Peak

14,110 ft

7,610 ft

1.44 mi

Manitou Springs

6,500 ft


Distance vs displacement3
Distance vs. Displacement its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Pike’s Peak Marathon

    Distance: 14.1 mi

    Displacement

Pikes Peak

14,110 ft

7,610 ft

1.44 mi

θ

Manitou Springs

6,500 ft


Scalar vs vector
Scalar its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time. vs. Vector

Distance: 14.1 mi

Displacement

Pikes Peak

14,110 ft

7,610 ft

1.44 mi

θ

Manitou Springs

6,500 ft


Displacement
Displacement its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • “The change in position is equal to the second position minus the first position”

  • Example: You are standing on a number line at 23 and suffer a blow to the head. When you wake up, you are laying at -17. What was your displacement?


Displacement1
Displacement its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Example: You are standing on a number line at 23 and suffer a blow to the head. When you wake up, you are laying at -17. What was your displacement?

  • Your displacement is 40 to the left


Speed
Speed its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Distance traveled in a given time interval

  • Distance per unit time

  • 60 mph, 35 m/s

  • Vector or scalar?


Average speed
Average Speed its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Distance travelled divided by time elapsed

  • Avg. speed = distance travelled/time elapsed


Average velocity
Average Velocity its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Displacement divided by time elapsed

  • Avg. velocity = displacement/time elapsed


Speed vs velocity
Speed vs. Velocity its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

Distance: 14.1 mi

Displacement

Pikes Peak

14,110 ft

7,610 ft

1.44 mi

θ

Manitou Springs

6,500 ft


Speed vs velocity1
Speed vs. Velocity its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Can the magnitude of the velocity ever be more than speed for any given timed movement of a body?


Speed vs velocity2
Speed vs. Velocity its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Can the magnitude of the velocity ever be more than speed for any given timed movement of a body?

    Distance equals displacement

    Distance is greater than or equal to displacement but never less than displacement


Speed vs velocity3
Speed vs. Velocity its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Can the magnitude of the velocity ever be more than speed for any given timed movement of a body?

  • Since distance is always greater than or equal to displacement

  • And since speed is distance/time

  • And since velocity is displacement/time

  • Speed will always be greater than or equal to velocity


Avg velocity the equation
Avg. Velocity: The Equation its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.


Average velocity of a car
Average Velocity of a Car its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.


Average velocity air track
Average Velocity – Air Track its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.


Instantaneous velocity
Instantaneous Velocity its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Velocity at a split second of time

  • The average velocity of an infinitesimally short time interval


Instantaneous velocity the equation
Instantaneous Velocity: The Equation its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.


Instantaneous velocity air track
Instantaneous Velocity its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.– Air Track


Instantaneous velocity1
Instantaneous Velocity its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Instantaneous speed will always equal the magnitude of the instantaneous velocity. Why?


Instantaneous velocity2
Instantaneous Velocity its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Instantaneous speed will always equal the magnitude of the instantaneous velocity. Why?

  • When distance/displacement become infinitesimally small, their difference also becomes infinitesimally small, approaching zero


Objectives2
Objectives its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Know the meaning of the terms mechanics, kinematics and dynamics

  • Know the difference between distance and displacement and how to measure each

  • Calculate average speed for a given distance and time

  • Calculate average velocity for a given displacement and time


Objectives3
Objectives its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • Know the difference between average speed and average velocity

  • Understand the concept of instantaneous velocity


Questions

Questions? its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.


Homework
Homework its position, velocity, and acceleration (with respect to a frame of reference) as functions of time.

  • #1-11


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