WELCOME TO
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 42

EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 35MM SLR MANUAL CAMERA IN WORKING CONDITION. DON’T HAVE ONE? HMMMM!!!!!!! ORDER ONE ON LINE AT: PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 51 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

WELCOME TO PHOTOGRAPHY 101. EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 35MM SLR MANUAL CAMERA IN WORKING CONDITION. DON’T HAVE ONE? HMMMM!!!!!!! ORDER ONE ON LINE AT: http://www.freestylephoto.biz/index.php

Download Presentation

EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS 35MM SLR MANUAL CAMERA IN WORKING CONDITION. DON’T HAVE ONE? HMMMM!!!!!!! ORDER ONE ON LINE AT:

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

WELCOME TO

PHOTOGRAPHY 101

EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS

35MM SLR MANUAL CAMERA IN WORKING CONDITION. DON’T HAVE ONE? HMMMM!!!!!!! ORDER ONE ON LINE AT:

http://www.freestylephoto.biz/index.php

HERE YOU CAN ORDER A MANUAL CAMERA THAT IS AFFORDABLE AND IT WORKS. I REALLY RECOMMEND YOU ORDER ONE TODAY.

CAMERA KIT

Vivitar V3800N 50mm f/1.7 Lens Starter Kit w/Two rolls Legacy Pro 400 iso B&W Film

Model# 59893 $179.99

ALL OTHER MATERIALS INCLUDING PORTFOLIO, FILM, PAPER, AND CHEMICALS WILL BE AVAILABLE TO YOU IN CLASS.

I will expect you to have a camera by the end of the week. I do not have any that work.

One more thing I would like you to get a note book that you can use for notes and exposure data.


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

Grading

  • Students are asked to shoot assignments over the weekend. This will require planning and preparation on your part. You are responsible for getting your film and equipment ready. You are a photographer now and must have your camera ready for action. Expect to shoot at least two rolls of film a week.

  • As the class progresses we will have weekly group critiques on yourwork. During which you will be asked to speak about your images, the worksite and lighting conditions, technique, exposure, and design.

  • You will be asked to give a power point presentation on an artist that will be assigned to you. After which you will produce a photograph that is inspired by the artist you have researched. This will count as an assignment.

  • During class I will be giving several demonstrations and you are responsible for your own observation and replication of techniques. You will see what I mean by this later.

  • I will be grading you on how well you use your studio time this semester. Approximately three points per day will be given out. It will be equivalent to an assignment grade/quarter. Each assignment is worth 100 points. There are about five assignments /quarter.

  • Midterm you are required to have five final prints ready for final critique. These prints must have the criteria necessary to pass as final. This requirement is added to the assignments as double.

  • Critiques are graded as an assignment.

  • Final grade is based on all assignments, critiques, and ten final prints.

  • Try to have fun because it is a major part of your grade.


Course objectives

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • This course concentrates primarily on the technical aspects of black and white film photography and the explorations of conceptual and formal approaches to photography and its visual design. The students will be asked to create images using the basic rules in design. The assignments will demonstrate a wide range of technical skills in both traditional and modern approaches to photography. Each assignment is a challenge for the students to create a personal voice as well as challenge them to develop mastery in concept, technique, approach, and subject matter. The assignments are designed to involve the students in a creative investigation of portfolio development.


Black and white photography

Black and White Photography

Why?


Milan cathedral wow

Milan Cathedral-wow!


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

Bailee

Donahue

In

France


Ansel adams

Ansel Adams

Lighting early in the morning or late in the evening can have dramatic effects.


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

Depth of Field

Reflections

Balance

Contrast

Directional line


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

Why Black and White?The answers are many, and call me old fashioned, but black and white, the original art that inspired Sir John Herschel to coin the term "photography" drawing with light will always have a rightful place in the pantheon of legitimate art forms.


Shallow depth of field

Shallow depth of field


When you begin to see things in black and white

When you begin to see things…………in black and white…..

Look and tell—what do you see?


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

See beyond just seeing

CONTRAST IN TONAL VALUES, SUBDUED LIGHTING, PROPORTION, SHAPES, LINES, COMPOSTIONAL RATIOS


Lewis hine

Lewis Hine

Building

The empire

State building


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

Newsboys getting ice cream from Street vendor. 1908 Wilmington, Delaware

Lewis Hine


Historical value

Historical value

  • Paul Strand


Dorothea lange

documentation

Dorothea Lange

“Migrant Mother” 1936


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

Dorothea Lange's "Migrant Mother" Photographs in the Farm Security Administration Collection: An Overview

The photograph that has become known as "Migrant Mother" is one of a series of photographs that Dorothea Lange made of Florence Owens Thompson and her children in February or March of 1936 in Nipomo, California. Lange was concluding a month's trip photographing migratory farm labor around the state for what was then the Resettlement Administration. In 1960, Lange gave this account of the experience:

I saw and approached the hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet. I do not remember how I explained my presence or my camera to her, but I do remember she asked me no questions. I made five exposures, working closer and closer from the same direction. I did not ask her name or her history. She told me her age, that she was thirty-two. She said that they had been living on frozen vegetables from the surrounding fields, and birds that the children killed. She had just sold the tires from her car to buy food. There she sat in that lean- to tent with her children huddled around her, and seemed to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me. There was a sort of equality about it. (From: Popular Photography, Feb. 1960).

The images were made using a Graflex camera. The original negatives are 4x5" film. It is not possible to determine on the basis of the negative numbers (which were assigned later at the Resettlement Administration) the order in which the photographs were taken.

There are no known restrictions on the use of Lange's "Migrant Mother" images. A rights statement for the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information black-and-white negatives is available online at: http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/071_fsab.html.


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

Hine


Henri cartier bresson

Henri Cartier-Bresson


Charles c ebbets 1932

Charles C. Ebbets 1932


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

Ansel Adams

yosemite


A photograph is a secret about a secret the more it tells you the less you know diane arbus

"A photograph is a secret about a secret. The more it tells you, the less you know. -- Diane Arbus


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

Ambient light is natural lighting. This allows for a soft glow with a wide range in tonal values. The beauty of black and white images allows for no distraction from color.


Arno minkkenen

ARNO MINKKENEN

SURREAL

SYMBIOSIS


Symbiosis integrating the body and landscape

SYMBIOSIS:Integrating the Bodyand Landscape


Reflections

reflections


Pattern

Pattern


Pattern1

pattern


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

Depth

Of

field


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

koppel


Shapes

shapes


Texture

Texture


Contrast

contrast


Dramatic atmosphere

Dramatic atmosphere


Fisheye lens

Fisheye lens


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

NICE

FIND


Tmax 400 film

TMAX 400 Film

  • Film Choice

  • There are a bewildering number of B&W films available for 35mm and roll film cameras. Some require special exposure techniques. Others require special processing. For now, we'll confine this discussion to films which can be processed in standard developers and fixers. We'll also add the requirement that the films are readily available. You might wish to explore the more exotic films at a later date. By then, you'll be better able to appreciate their special characteristics.

  • Any simple B&W film consists of three layers. The first is the light-sensitive emulsion layer. The second layer is a plastic strip which supports the emulsion layer. The third is an anti-halation layer coated on the back of the plastic strip. The purpose of this last layer is to capture light which has come through the emulsion and plastic layers and keep it from bouncing back -- blurring the image or fogging the film.

  • The emulsion layer contains tiny grains of a silver salt. These salt grains have the amazing ability to soak up bits of light [photons] and, once the light has been absorbed, to react with a developer chemical and break down into pure silver. Until the silver salt absorbs light, though, it will not react with the developer. Each little grain requires a certain minimum amount of light before it will react. Curiously, the entire grain will then react with the developer -- not just the tiny parts of it where the photons struck. For each individual grain, it's all or nothing.

  • This is the key the manufacturers use to make films more or less sensitive to light. If the grains are larger, less light is needed to produce a given amount of silver in the developed image. The film will turn a darker gray than one with smaller grains. It will be a "faster" film, and will produce a useable image with less total light. And of course if the grains are smaller, the opposite happens. The film will require more light to produce the same amount of silver in the developed image. It's a "slower" film.


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

  • Film speed is stated as an ISO number.

  • In years past, the letters ASA were used. The actual number is the same.

  • An ASA 400 film has the same speed as an ISO 400 film.

  • At this point, you may be wondering why it's important to know all this information.

  • There are two reasons:

  • Faster films are generally "grainier" when enlarged as compared to slower films.

  • Speed and graininess are the basis on which you choose which film to use for a specific photographic situation.

  • By the way – you'll run into the concept of a trade-off or "give-to-get" more than once. Film speed and graininess is just one example.

  • Commonly available B&W films have speed ratings of ISO 50 to ISO 400. The numbers you will most often see are 50, 100 or 125 and 400. The higher the number, the "faster" the film. Films with higher ISO numbers need less light to form a useful image than films with lower ISO numbers. The difference between 100 and 125 is too small to affect a choice.

  • * A doubling of the film speed number means that the faster film will require only half the light to form an image just as dark as the slower film.

  • This doubling adds up quickly. An ISO 100 film needs half the light of an ISO 50 film. An ISO 200 film needs one quarter the light of the ISO 50 film, and an ISO 400 film only needs one eighth as much light as the ISO 50 film. Another way to say this is that an ISO 400 film is 8 times faster than an ISO 50 film. You can see that the readily available films give you a real difference in performance.

  • The image on a developed negative is made up of silver grains. The larger the grains in the film, the bigger they will appear in an enlargement. If the film is very grainy, the grains will be easily visible as speckling in an 8 by 10 inch enlargement of a 35mm negative.


Equipment requirements 35mm slr manual camera in working condition don t have one hmmmm order one on line at

  • "rules of thumb."

  • * Shutter Speed Rule: Don't take hand-held pictures at shutter speeds slower than 1 over the focal length of the lens.

  • The reason for this rule is that we want as sharp a negative image as possible. The longer the focal length of the lens, the more it will magnify any shakiness in our hands as we hold the camera. If the camera lens says 50mm, don't set the shutter to slower than 1/50th second.

  • If you put the camera on a tripod, this rule doesn't apply. You can use much slower shutter speeds as long as your subject doesn't move. That's one of several reasons to use a tripod.

  • Another is to permit you to more precisely examine and "frame" the composition of the picture.

  • * f16 Rule: The correct exposure for an average subject in bright sunlight is 1 over the ISO number of the film, with the camera's lens opening set at f16.

  • This rule allows you to estimate the exposures you'll need with a film based on its ISO rating. For an ISO 50 film, this is 1/50th second at f16. For an ISO 400 film, it's 1/400th second at f16. If your camera's shutter doesn't have exactly the speed given by the rule, just choose the next higher speed. For ISO 50, you can use 1/60 second. For ISO 400 film, use 1/500 second.

  • That's all you need to know at this point to make a film selection. [If f numbers and shutter speeds don't quite make sense yet, they will once you read through the next article. We'll include information on depth of focus in that article, too.]

  • The 50 ASA [slow] films are the correct choice when:

  • * the finished enlargement must have minimum 'graininess', or

  • * the finished enlargement must have maximum detail, or

  • * the light will be strong enough to allow an acceptable combination of shutter speeds and lens openings.

  • The ISO 400 [fast] films are the correct choice when:

  • * graininess is not very important or perhaps even desired, or

  • * the amount of light available will be low, or

  • * shutter speeds must be high in order to stop motion.

  • The ISO 100/125 films are a compromise choice when you don't need either extreme.

  • So, which film? Two commonly available brand names are Ilford and Kodak. Both make 35mm and roll films. The films are of high quality. The ones we recommend are:

  • We will be using Kodak tmax film. The first quarter will be with iso400 speed film. The second quarter you will be choosing 100 or 400 depending on situations.

  • So there you have it. If you're interested in, say, 35mm landscape photography, you'll probably find that 100 iso gives you sharp, fine-grained negatives that you can easily enlarge to 8 X 10 inches. If, on the other hand, you want to take pictures in low light situations or pictures of moving objects where high shutter speeds are necessary, Tri-X or HP5 will be your choice. And if you don't feel that you need either extreme, Plus-X or FP4 are ready to serve your needs.


  • Login