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Welcome !. Introductions Plan for the day. Aims of today. Consider how we as individuals and groups can contribute towards ‘No Avoidable Infections’ Review how best to ‘make a difference’ in working with people who can deliver the necessary changes and improvements

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Welcome !

Introductions

Plan for the day

aims of today
Aims of today
  • Consider how we as individuals and groups can contribute towards ‘No Avoidable Infections’
  • Review how best to ‘make a difference’ in working with people who can deliver the necessary changes and improvements
  • Gather some useful new perspectives and a toolbox of ideas
  • Communicate messages and ‘asks’ to DH in a way which will stimulate forward action
    • Lindsay Wilkinson will be here at 2.30pm today
    • MP event on April 1st hosted by Dr Brian Iddon MP
  • Hone succinct messaging and communications plans driven by your own group\'s objectives
  • What else?
beyond token involvement
Beyond token involvement
  • Government has passed legislation to involve patients and the public in shaping local health services so that they truly reflect the needs of the community they serve.
  • NHS is being given more responsibility by the Government for the design and delivery of local health services and has a duty to involve and consult patients and the public when planning services. All of this means that local campaigning and influencing will become more important and there is more opportunity for direct involvement in improving services
across all sectors
Across all sectors

There is a long history in the UK of people coming together in groups to achieve a common goal. Quite often, ‘grass roots’ activists with similar experiences got together simply as a way of supporting each other, or because they felt they were being discriminated against.

Some have campaigned for better services or better working conditions while others have simply strived to raise awareness.

Many of the independent disability advocacy groups in the UK were started by grass roots activists; now they are properly funded and provide substantial support.

RNIB (2004) ISBN 1 85878 621 5

slide6

“We need to work in partnership – in particular with patients and patient groups.

In order to form effective prevention and control policies, it is essential to work closely with patients and their relatives to better tailor policies to patients real needs...well informed and empowered patients are a strong asset for European societies.”    

Commissioner Vassiliou, 7 April at ECPC Cancer Patient Summit

slide7

“If campaigning groups don’t represent the public and patients in policy-making, then who is going to ?”

Jeremy Laurance. Health Editor, The Independent.

Challenges facing the Health Advocacy Community

The views of policymakers & media, Health Equality Europe, 2006

who s most active pressing for change
“Who’s most active pressing for change?”

a

Challenges Facing the Health Advocacy Community:

a Europe-Wide Survey of Health Campaigners (2006)

who values and takes you seriously as a health campaigner
“Who values and takes you seriously as a health campaigner?”

a

Challenges Facing the Health Advocacy Community:

a Europe-Wide Survey of Health Campaigners (2006)

how do you deliver your campaign
“How do you deliver your campaign?”

s

Challenges Facing the Health Advocacy Community:

a Europe-Wide Survey of Health Campaigners (2006)

major activities of campaigning groups in europe
Major activities of campaigning groups in Europe

Challenges Facing the Health Advocacy Community:

a Europe-Wide Survey of Health Campaigners (2006)

slide12
“Do you believe the patient/advocacy movement could become an effective force within healthcare systems?”

“Yes but they’ll always have to battle for airtime with the likes of doctors, nurses & political players”

Patient advocates need to be self-critical. People they put forward as representatives need to be effective

Gary Finnegan, Editor Irish Medical Times

Joanne Shaw, Vice-Chair NHS Direct

“Yes absolutely.

And it will.

This is a definite trend”

“Yes it already is”

Jeremy Laurance, Health Editor, The Independent

In: Challenges facing the Health Advocacy Community

The views of policymakers & media, Health Equality Europe, 2006

Stephen Pollard, Director Health Policy

Programme, Centre for the New Europe

focus on hcai stakeholders
Focus on HCAI stakeholders
  • Clear Government policies for increasing patient and public involvement in place
  • DH has set up the HCAI stakeholder forum with twice-yearly meetings

+ Your ad hoc interactions with DH

+ DH has asked for some input from some of you

+ You’ve been active in a range of your own initiatives

  • DH is aware of positive impact of working together with advocacy groups (eg cancer)

Asked me to support you in developing the relationship

  • There is real potential for achieving better outcomes by working to deliver shared objectives with the DH, the NHS, patients and the public.
the value of experience and how to use it to reach your objectives
What motivates us?

How to employ your experience to the best effect.

The value of experience and how to use it to reach your objectives
masterclass
Campaigning tools and using them with greater precision to achieve what you plan to achieve.

Look at the range of decision makers – who could you reach out to?

What are the different methods and techniques that you can use?

What makes an effective patient group?

What makes an effective patient advocate?

How to ensure that people listen?

Masterclass
slide17

CMO responds to recommendations.

Implementation Group established.

DVT campaign

Government established expert

working group on DVT in

hospitalised patients. Group submitted

report with recommendations on

best practice to Chief Med Officer.

12 recommendations from HSC

resulted in favourable NHS

environment for increased

use of thromboprophylaxis

Maintain pressure to

ensure implementation

of new guidance

HSC

Inquiry

Arm Parliamentarians with the

facts, ideas and do the leg-work

MP & Peer Seminar:

“VTE deaths”

Communicate to Parliamentarians

but also officials

Think Tank Seminar:

“Preventable deaths”

KOL Parliamentary & Policy

briefings:“VTE deaths in UK”

Mobilise researchers and KOLs

Advocacy-led

project over

15 months

Patient group launch. Etablish

‘Lifeblood’ in Westminster,

Scotland and Wales

Support patient groups in

carrying the message

slide18

Implementing NSF for Diabetes

Diabetes Czar

“The consultation is a great initiative which helps my work tremendously”

Launched at Treasury

Grassroots feedback

via managed blog

Events in libraries

& hospitals

Health Minister

“The grassroots information helps me raise diabetes issues in Government”

Report presented

To Minister with

media

patient group responses to negative nice
Patient group responses to negative NICE

Each patient group made a robust direct response to NICE

Beating Bowel Cancer

Mobilizing email to 50 “Patient Voices”

International Myeloma Foundation

Website ‘How To’ and response mobilization

Mailed 600 haematology nurses

Lymphoma Association

Website ‘How To’ and response mobilization

Patient activist for media & political activities

Macmillan Cancer Relief

Website ‘How To’ and response mobilization

Ovacome

Mobilizing email to 1,300 members

Mother & daughter patient activists

Leukaemia CARE

Website ‘How To’ and response mobilization

Bowel Cancer UK

Website ‘How To’ and response mobilization

CancerBACUP

Led joint consultation response

The Patients Association

Media personality with cancer open to media

routes to generate your data mobilize supporters
Routes to generate your data & mobilize supporters
  • Telephone hotline audit
  • Vox pops
  • Zoomerang questionnaires
  • Web-based voting around a Service Pledge
  • On-line surveys (managed blogs)
  • Publication reviews
  • Learning at the NHS desk/ in the lab
  • Trials
  • Patient groups eg diabetes, kidney disease, DVT, cancer
range of delivery vehicles
Range of delivery vehicles
  • You, and your memberships supported by templates
  • Telephone, emails and e-virus chains
  • Websites – your own and related interest groups
  • Newsletters, pamphlets and magazine articles
  • Letter to the Editor / Letter to the Minister
  • Local user groups (LINks)
  • Response to public consultations
  • Ask for input to DH/local NHS working teams
  • Journalists and health editors
  • Seminars & Radio Days with experts
range of delivery vehicles1
Range of delivery vehicles
  • Letters, briefings and meetings with Ministerial, DH, MPs and councillors
  • Constituency Days of Action/ MP clinic visits
  • Parliamentary tactics via MP APPGs and peers: PQ/WQ, debates, EDMs, MP visits in House of Commons, stakeholder inquiry event (World Health Day, 7th April)
  • Parliamentary elections: MEP election issue/ party health manifestos/ prospective candidates
  • Co-signed declarations as a political tool (launch events with media coverage)
  • Mass lobby of Parliament
co signed declarations and calls for action examples
Co-signed declarations and calls for action, examples
  • Warsaw Declaration
  • Breakthrough Service Pledge
  • European Patients Forum
  • Europacolon
  • Lung Cancer Plan
  • Cancer Campaigning Group
resources
Resources
  • Professional Panel of experts, includes
    • Prof Martin Buxton/Julia Fox-Rusby (HE & Social Sciences)
    • Prof Nick Bosanquet (Health Policy)
    • Prof Ray Powles (Oncologist)
    • Dr Martin Duerden (Consultant Public Health)
    • Mr Michael Sobanja (Chair NHS Confederation)
    • Ros Meek (CEO ARMA)
    • Jane Jones (Consultant in medical education)
    • Isobel Davies (Consultant in HR)
  • Introductions to other charities
    • Cancer, Kidney disease, Diabetes, DVT etc
  • ‘How to’ for your members to be effective advocates
  • Learning at the NHS desk/ in the lab
  • Platforms for the HCAI stakeholder groups are in development
what makes an effective advocate
What makes an effective advocate?
  • Clear aims, simple messages and what you are calling for
    • Impact and need for change
    • Personal face on the issue
  • A well-argued case supported by facts
    • Anecdotal feedback
    • Statistics/ questionnaire/survey
    • How the proposal has worked well elsewhere
  • A message that is and sounds helpful – in line with DH objectives
    • Politically relevant
    • Takes into account all relevant issues
    • Comes across appropriately
    • One that helps people to do their job
what makes an effective advocate1
What makes an effective advocate?
  • Being strategic
    • Picking short-term wins but being ready to play the long game
    • Integration of political, clinical, scientific and public elements
  • Being fleet of foot, alert to opportunities with clear talking points
    • ‘Elevator speech’ for a quick briefing of official, MP or journalist
  • Mobilising people who have the power to make the changes – and those who influence them
  • Active/influential supporters – diverse experts, related interest groups and public
  • An appropriate range of delivery vehicles
  • Being mindful of ones personal and professional reputation as a campaigner
what makes an effective advocate2
What makes an effective advocate?
  • Effective communication
    • ‘Open’ questions, cool-calm-collected
    • Listening skills
  • Assertiveness not aggression
  • Negotiation
    • If there is complete disagreement over an issue try to find a ‘middle ground’ that you can all agree on
    • If there is no middle ground, a reasonable, realistic compromise
advocacy lessons learned

Promoting patient-centred healthcare around the world

ADVOCACY: LESSONS LEARNED
  • Get Their Attention; It’s the Sizzle That Sells
  • Make Them Care; Engage Them Emotionally
  • An Effective Demonstration Needs Numbers; Make It Politically Worthwhile to Solve the Issue
  • Engage Influential Insiders to Support Issue; Better Yet, Get a Seat at the Table
  • Row Together; Find Common Ground; Watch Out for “Divide and Conquer”; Keep Everyone Informed and Engaged
  • Let Others (Without Vested Interest) Speak For You; Make Solving the Issue the “Right Thing” to Do
  • Small is Good; Don’t Forget: David Won
  • When You Get to the Top, Don’t Forget to Send the Elevator Back Down
characteristics of an influential campaigning group
Characteristics of an influential campaigning group

Challenges facing the Health Advocacy Community

The views of policymakers & media, Health Equality Europe, 2006

characteristics of an influential campaigning group1
Characteristics of an influential campaigning group

Mel Read former MEP.

Challenges facing the Health Advocacy Community

The views of policymakers & media, Health Equality Europe, 2006

planning your messages tactical plan
Where does local practice need to change?

Where does national policy need to change?

Beginning to think through which parts of your agenda “fit” best where and therefore how to communicate so that people listen

and act.

What are you campaigning objectives and who are you trying to reach and why, what are you going to do and when; who will take this forward?

PLANNING YOUR MESSAGES & TACTICAL PLAN
strategic planning
Strategic Planning
  • Simply put, strategic planning determines where an organization is going over the next year or more, how it\'s going to get there and how it\'ll know if it got there or not
  • Goals-based planning is probably the most common and starts with focus on the organization\'s mission, goals to work toward the mission, strategies to achieve the goals, and action planning (who will do what and by when).
benefits of strategic planning
Benefits of Strategic Planning

Strategic planning serves a variety of purposes, including:

1. Clearly define the purpose of the organization and to establish realistic goals

2. Communicate those goals and objectives to the organization’s constituents.

3. Develop a sense of ownership of the plan.

4. Ensure the most effective use is made of the organization’s resources by focusing the resources on the key priorities.

5. Provide a base from which progress can be measured and establish a mechanism for informed change when needed.

6. Bring together of everyone’s best and most reasoned efforts

7. Provides clearer focus of organization, producing more efficiency and effectiveness

slide35

NAME OF GROUP:

Mission Statement

Key Objectives

1.J

2.’lk

3. G

4.

FGHJHM

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

slide36

NAME OF GROUP:

Key Achievements To Date

F

D

D

G

FGHJHM

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

What Else We Would Like to Achieve eg Change What ?

F

D

D

G

FGHJHM

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

slide37

NAME OF GROUP:

STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES

FGHJHM

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

FGHJHM

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

OPPORTUNITIES THREATS

our engagement plan timeline
OUR ENGAGEMENT PLAN TIMELINE

OBJECTIVE:

1

2

3

4

FGJ Y FGXJSYKDUK

slide41

NAME OF GROUP:

New Support or Skills We Need To Deliver Our Plan

F

D

D

G

D

D

D

D

F

B

F

F

FGHJHM

G

G

G

G

G

G

SDG

G

DFHF

V

VHJN

B

FGHJHM

G

G

G

G

G

G

G

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