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Employee Wellness… The Intersect of a Productive Worker. Drew Bossen, PT, MBA Atlas Ergonomics. Agenda…. Introduction The Boomer’s are Coming… - The Age Shift - Workforce Implications Design Consideration Size Matters… Prevalence Medical Conditions & Associated Costs Atlas Data

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Employee Wellness…

The Intersect of a Productive Worker

Drew Bossen, PT, MBA

Atlas Ergonomics

slide2

Agenda…

  • Introduction
  • The Boomer’s are Coming…

- The Age Shift

- Workforce Implications

    • Design Consideration
  • Size Matters…
    • Prevalence
    • Medical Conditions & Associated Costs
    • Atlas Data
    • The Future
slide3

Atlas Overview…

Case Management

Return to Work Evaluation

Total Systems

Approach

Rehab Services

Recordable Event

Reactive Ergonomics

Employee Triage

Discomfort

Pro-active Ergonomics & Wellness

Pre-work Screens

Essential Function Profiles of Jobs

slide4

Atlas Overview…

Case Management

Return to Work Evaluation

Rehab Services

Recordable Event

Reactive Ergonomics

Employee Triage

Discomfort

Pro-active Ergonomics & Wellness

Hire the right people

Pre-work Screens

Essential Function Profiles of Jobs

slide5

Atlas Overview…

Case Management

Return to Work Evaluation

Rehab Services

Recordable Event

Reactive Ergonomics

Help them avoid injury

Employee Triage

Discomfort

Pro-active Ergonomics & Wellness

Hire the right people

Pre-work Screens

Essential Function Profiles of Jobs

slide6

Atlas Overview…

Case Management

Get them back to work quickly

Return to Work Evaluation

Rehab Services

Recordable Event

Reactive Ergonomics

Help them avoid injury

Employee Triage

Discomfort

Pro-active Ergonomics & Wellness

Hire the right people

Pre-work Screens

Essential Function Profiles of Jobs

slide7

Atlas Overview…

Case Management

Return to Work Evaluation

Rehab Services

Recordable Event

Reactive Ergonomics

Employee Triage

Discomfort

Pro-active Ergonomics & Wellness

Proactive Approach

Pre-work Screens

Essential Function Profiles of Jobs

slide8

Atlas Overview…

Case Management

Return to Work Evaluation

Rehab Services

Recordable Event

Reactive Approach

Reactive Ergonomics

Employee Triage

Discomfort

Pro-active Ergonomics & Wellness

Proactive Approach

Pre-work Screens

Essential Function Profiles of Jobs

slide9

Atlas Overview…

Case Management

Return to Work Evaluation

Rehab Services

Recordable Event

Reactive Ergonomics

Medical Management

Employee Triage

Discomfort

Pro-active Ergonomics & Wellness

Pre-work Screens

Essential Function Profiles of Jobs

slide10

Atlas Overview…

Case Management

Return to Work Evaluation

Case

Management

Rehab Services

Recordable Event

Reactive Ergonomics

Medical Management

Employee Triage

Discomfort

Pro-active Ergonomics & Wellness

Pre-work Screens

Essential Function Profiles of Jobs

slide11

Atlas Overview…

Case Management

Return to Work Evaluation

Data Flow

Rehab Services

Recordable Event

Reactive Ergonomics

Employee Triage

Discomfort

Pro-active Ergonomics & Wellness

Pre-work Screens

Essential Function Profiles of Jobs

slide12

Atlas Overview…

Case Management

Return to Work Evaluation

Total Systems

Approach

Rehab Services

Recordable Event

Reactive Ergonomics

Employee Triage

Discomfort

Pro-active Ergonomics & Wellness

Pre-work Screens

Essential Function Profiles of Jobs

slide13

The Boomer’s are Coming…

What are the implications…

slide19

Boomer Factoids…

  • It is the fastest growing population segment.
  • It is the most affluent consumer group that exists.
  • It accounts for over 40% of total consumer demand.
  • It control over 48% of all discretionary purchases in the U.S.
  • It owns 62% of all large Wall Street investment accounts.
  • It dines out 4-5 times per week.

As of today…

Every 7 seconds someone in America turns 50.

Regarding that 50+ age group:

Source:

Gary Onks – SoldOnSeniors, Inc.

SoldOnSeniors.com

slide20

Life Expectancy…

Population by Age and Sex: 1900

Source of Life Expectancy:

National Center of Health Statistics, Health, United States, 1990, Hyattsville, MD: Public Health Service, 1991.

Male

(millions)

Female

(millions)

slide21

Life Expectancy…

Population by Age and Sex: 1990

Source of Life Expectancy:

National Center of Health Statistics, “Advance Report of Final Mortality Statistics, 1990, “Monthly vital Statistics Report, Vol.41, no. 7, Supplement, Hyattsville, MD: Public Health Service, 1993.

Male

(millions)

Female

(millions)

Boomers

slide22

Life Expectancy…

Population by Age and Sex: 2020

Source of Life Expectancy:

National Center of Health Statistics, “Advance Report of Final Mortality Statistics, 1990, “Monthly vital Statistics Report, Vol.41, no. 7, Supplement, Hyattsville, MD: Public Health Service, 1993.

Male

(millions)

Female

(millions)

Boomers

slide23

Life Expectancy…

Population by Age and Sex: 2040

Source of Life Expectancy:

National Center of Health Statistics, “Advance Report of Final Mortality Statistics, 1990, “Monthly vital Statistics Report, Vol.41, no. 7, Supplement, Hyattsville, MD: Public Health Service, 1993.

Male

(millions)

Female

(millions)

Boomers

slide24

Life Expectancy…

Source of Life Expectancy:

National Center of Health Statistics, “Advance Report of Final Mortality Statistics, 1990, “Monthly vital Statistics Report, Vol.41, no. 7, Supplement, Hyattsville, MD: Public Health Service, 1993.

Reported in Millions

1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050

slide25

Changes in the Workforce…

Given that…

What are the implication for the workforce as we approach 2015?

slide27

Vision…

  • Visual acuity declines with age

≈ 25% by age 60

  • Visual reaction time doubles
  • The time to react to glare increases 50%
  • More light is required with aging
    • 40-year old requires 2X
    • 60-year old requires 5-6X
slide28

Vision…

  • Contrast sensitivity decreases with aging
    • 40-year old requires 120%
    • 50-year old requires 160%
    • 65-year old requires 270%
slide29

Vision…

  • Contrast sensitivity decreases with aging
    • 40-year old requires 120%
    • 50-year old requires 160%
    • 65-year old requires 270%
  • Field of view, motion perception, and depth perception all decline with age
slide30

Hearing…

  • Consistent hearing loss with aging
    • 2-3.5% per year throughout life
  • Mid-range hearing loss
    • By age 50, is 10 dB,
    • By age 60 it is 25 dB,
    • By age 70 it is 35 dB
  • Decreased ability to tune out background noise
slide31

Cognitive Ability…

  • Information processing declines with age
  • Cognitive ability declines with age
    • Learn new material or skills
    • Attend to two or more tasks at once
    • Long term memory
slide33

Strength…

  • Strength decreases with age
    • 5% by age 40
    • 20% by age 55
    • 40% by age 75
  • Most dramatic after the age 65.
    • 80% of the loss is due to inactivity however it can be maintained with training
  • Tendon strength decrease with age
    • Rotator Cuff tears
    • Achilles Tendon ruptures
slide36

Metabolic Rate…

  • Basal metabolic rate declines with age
slide39

Aerobic Power…

  • Maximum Aerobic Power declines with age
    • At age of 65 it is 70% of what it was at age of 25
slide40

Aerobic Power…

Max HR = 220 – age

slide42

Changes in our Tissues…

  • Aging is associated with changes within skeletal muscle
    • Decrease force, power, endurance, and
    • Increase recover time for an injury
  • More vulnerable to injury
  • Reduced capacity to regenerate after tissue injury due to overexertion
slide43

Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs)…

  • MSDs are the most common cause of disability among workers in their 50’s and 60’s
  • Advancing age is associated with more spinal complaints, hand pain, and other upper extremity pain
slide44

Slips, Trips and Falls…

  • Reaction times slow with aging
    • 40-year old requires 25% more time
    • 60-year old requires 150% more time
  • Trips are common in older people because of age related changes in gait
  • A weaker skeleton intensify the injuries associates with falls in older people
slide46

A Boomer’s Perspective…

Who We Are: As 77 million boundless, ageless, timeless baby boomers move into the next stage of their lives, they are redefining quality of life itself and continuing their signature quest for personal and social meaning. Boomers are redesigning mid-life, redefining the empty nest, reinventing retirement and exploring life in new and unexpected ways.

http://www3.sc.maricopa.edu/boomerz/about.htm

slide47

A Boomer’s Perspective…

Source: American Heart Association, January 2004

OPTIMISM: ANOTHER WORD FOR DENIALA large majority (89 percent) of Boomer respondents are optimistic that they will have a healthy future and nearly all (97 percent) look forward to an active lifestyle in retirement. This optimism is belied, however, by the way many baby boomers actually live -- and choose to ignore potential health problems.

Clyde Yancy, MD

American Heart Association Board Member

Professor of Medicine/Cardiology, Univ. of Texas

slide49

Prevalence of Obesity by Age…

Source: aspe.hhs.gov/health/prevention/fig1

slide50

Definitions…

  • Overweight: excess of body weight.
    • Muscle
    • Bone
    • Fat
    • Body water.
  • Obesity: abnormally high proportion of body fat.
  • BMI is a reliable indicator of total body fat.
    • Calculation based on height & weight
    • It is not gender specific
    • Does not directly measure % of body fat
    • Better measure than weight alone
slide51

Limits of BMI…

The limits of BMI include:

  • It may overestimate body fat in athletes and others who have a muscular build.
  • It may underestimate body fat in older persons and others who have lost muscle mass.
  • Appropriate weight gain during pregnancy varies and depends upon initial body weight or BMI level. 
    • Pregnant women should contact a health professional to assure appropriate weight gain during pregnancy.
slide56

Prevalence of Overweight / Obese...

Prevalence of overweight , obese and extreme obbesity among adults. Percentage of adults aged 20-74 who were classified as obese (body mass index ≥25.00 kg/m²) in the National Health Examination Survey 1 (NHES1) and in eight National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES)

slide57

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1985...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide58

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1986...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide59

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1987...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide60

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1988...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide61

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1989...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide62

No Data <10% 10%–14%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1990...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide63

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1991...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide64

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1992...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide65

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1993...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide66

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1994...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide67

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1995...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide68

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1996...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide69

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1997...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide70

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1998...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide71

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 1999...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide72

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 2000...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide73

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 2001...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

<10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide74

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 2002...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

<10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide75

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 2003...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

<10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide76

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 2004...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

<10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide77

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 2005...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

<10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide78

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 2006...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

<10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide79

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 2007...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

<10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide80

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 2008...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

<10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide81

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 2009...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

<10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide82

Obese Trends – BRFSS, 2010...

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’ 4” woman)

<10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%

Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, CDC

slide84

Medical Conditions…

  • Overweight and obesity are known risk factors for:
  • Diabetes
  • Heart Disease
  • Stroke
  • Hypertension
  • Gallbladder Disease
  • Osteoarthritis (degeneration of cartilage and bone of joints)
  • Sleep Apnea and other breathing problems
  • Some forms of cancer (uterine, breast, colorectal, kidney)
slide91

Don’t Wait for the Defect…

Discomfort

Root

Causes

slide92

Don’t Wait for the Defect…

Pain &

Dysfunction

Discomfort

Root

Causes

slide93

Don’t Wait for the Defect…

Recordable

Injury

Pain &

Dysfunction

Discomfort

Root

Causes

slide94

Don’t Wait for the Defect…

Recordable

Injury

Pain &

Dysfunction

Discomfort

Root

Causes

slide96

Office…

921 participants

U.S. Utility Call Center

slide101

Atlas Data…

% of Population Experiencing Low Back Discomfort

slide102

Atlas Data…

28,000 participants

Schneider National, Inc.

slide103

Atlas Data…

Source: The Measurement of Man & Woman. Revised Edition; Human Factors in Design; Henry Dreyfuss Associates.  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc.   

slide104

BMI Distribution in Commercial Drivers…

** Occupational Screening for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Commercial Drivers

Indira Gurubhagavatula, Greg Maislin, Jonathan E. Nkwuo and Allan I. Pack

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine Vol 170. pp. 371-376, (2004)

slide105

BMI Distribution in Commercial Drivers…

** Occupational Screening for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Commercial Drivers

Indira Gurubhagavatula, Greg Maislin, Jonathan E. Nkwuo and Allan I. Pack

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine Vol 170. pp. 371-376, (2004)

slide106

Atlas Data…

Source: 2009 Atlas White Paper

Transportation Ergonomics: Relationship between Demographics and Discomfort in the Trucking Industry. March 2009

slide107

Atlas Data…

Source: 2009 Atlas White Paper

Transportation Ergonomics: Relationship between Demographics and Discomfort in the Trucking Industry. March 2009

slide108

Atlas Data…

Source: 2009 Atlas White Paper

Transportation Ergonomics: Relationship between Demographics and Discomfort in the Trucking Industry. March 2009

slide110

Claim Costs / BMI…

Archives of Internal Medicine

2007; 167; 766-773

slide111

LWD per Claims / BMI…

Archives of Internal Medicine

2007; 167; 766-773

slide112

Short Term Disability…

Archives of Internal Medicine

2007; 167; 766-773

slide113

Workplace Injuries…

Archives of Internal Medicine

2007; 167; 766-773

slide116

Medical Claims…

Archives of Internal Medicine

2007; 167; 766-773

slide117

Medical Claims…

Archives of Internal Medicine

2007; 167; 766-773

slide118

Medical Claims Costs…

Archives of Internal Medicine

2007; 167; 766-773

slide119

Lost Workdays…

Archives of Internal Medicine

2007; 167; 766-773

slide120

Indemnity Claims Costs…

Archives of Internal Medicine

2007; 167; 766-773

slide122

Risky Behaviors…

Preliminary Estimates from

SNI New Hire Panel Study

Analysis by Jon Anderson & Stephen Burks;

University of Minnesota, Morris.

For background, see the Truckers & Turnover Project web page:

http://www.morris.umn.edu/academics/truckingproject/

slide123

Risky Behaviors…

Preliminary Estimates from

SNI New Hire Panel Study

Analysis by Jon Anderson & Stephen Burks;

University of Minnesota, Morris.

For background, see the Truckers & Turnover Project web page:

http://www.morris.umn.edu/academics/truckingproject/

slide125

Critical Reading…

Dee W. Edington

Health Management Research Center

University of Michigan

March 2009

slide126

Paradigm Shift…

“The Cost of Healthcare” (Treating Disease)

To

“The Total Value of Healthcare” (Managing Health Status)

slide127

Health Continuum…

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Birth

Death

slide128

Health Continuum…

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Health Risk Factors

Birth

Death

slide129

Health Continuum…

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Health Risk Factors

Birth

Death

slide130

Health Continuum…

Wellness

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Health Risk Factors

Birth

Death

slide131

Health Continuum…

Wellness

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Health Risk Factors

Birth

Death

Treatment

slide132

Health Continuum…

Wellness

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Health Risk Factors

Birth

Death

Prevention

Treatment

slide133

Health Continuum…

Wellness

So how might we slow down this process… or Improve the health status??

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Health Risk Factors

Birth

Death

Prevention

Treatment

slide134

Health Continuum…

Wellness

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Health Risk Factors

Birth

Death

Prevention

Treatment

slide135

Health Continuum…

Wellness

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Health Risk Factors

Birth

Death

Prevention

Treatment

slide136

Health Continuum…

Wellness

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Health Risk Factors

Birth

Death

Prevention

Treatment

slide137

Health Continuum…

Wellness

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Health Risk Factors

Birth

Death

Prevention

Treatment

slide138

Bending the Curve…

The

“Do Nothing Strategy”

slide139

Wellness Strategy…

Keep the Healthy… Healthy

slide140

Wellness Strategy…

Keep the Healthy… Healthy

Everyone Else… Don’t Get Worse

slide141

Health Continuum…

Wellness

Optimal Health

Chronic Illness

Health Risk Factors

Birth

Death

Prevention

Treatment

Bending the Curve of Healthcare

slide142

Why Wellness…

Schneider National, Inc

Wellness Program

slide143

Why Wellness…

  • Obesity is linked to a multitude disease states
  • Also linked to a various Work-Comp Metrics
slide144

Wellness Programming…

  • Screening programs linked to medical care delivery to ensure follow-up and appropriate treatment.
  • Health education that focuses on skill development and lifestyle behavior change.
  • Supportive social and physical environments and policies that promote health.
  • Integration of the worksite program into the organization’s culture.
  • Related programs to assist employee success.
slide146

Wellness Programming…

  • Height and Weight
  • Blood Pressure Screening
  • Resting Heart Rate
  • Blood Work
    • Total Cholesterol
    • Triglycerides
    • Glucose
  • Cardio-Vascular Test
  • Health Risk Assessment
slide153

What we’ve Learned…

  • Recruiting and program retention is successful when it’s relationship-based.
  • Office, Shop and Driver associates all demonstrated positive health outcomes with the Wellness Program.
  • There is a general lack of knowledge and application of general health principles by all groups.
slide154

What we’ve Learned…

Most Challenging

  • Challenge Rating
  • Smoking
  • BMI
  • Triglycerides
  • Blood Pressure
  • Glucose
  • Cholesterol Ratio
  • Aerobic Capacity
  • Finding a Primary Care MD / carrying medical insurance

Easily attainable

slide155

What we’ve Learned…

Learning healthy behaviors isn’t “Rocket Science”, so why is it so hard?

Diet + Exercise

– Smoking

=Better Health

slide156

What we’ve Learned…

  • For the Participant, it is a 2 step process:
  • Understand your current condition
slide157

What we’ve Learned…

  • For the Participant, it is a 2 step process:
  • Understand your current condition
  • Convert your new knowledge into practice
slide160

What we’ve Learned…

  • Wellness is a key to keeping our fleet on the road.
  • A typical driver DOT exam, or annual physical does not address wellness.
  • Helping parents along the road to wellness will help our future – children mimic what they see.
  • We have to provide the education and the opportunity to facilitate lifestyle changes… it will not happen on its own.
  • We need to create the culture of wellness at every turn. It is not inherent to this industry.
slide163

Prevalence of Overweight - Children…

Prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents. Percentage of children aged 2-5, 6-11, and adolescents 12-19, who were classified as overweight (95th percentile of body mass index for age according to the 2000 Center for Disease Control growth charts) in the National Health Examination Survey 1 (NHES1) and in four National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES)

slide166

Life Expectancy…

  • Obesity could shorten the average lifespan of an entire generation.
    • 2-5 year reduction in the lifespan of a child born today

New England Journal of Medicine

March 2005

slide167

Life Expectancy…

  • “Childhood obesity is like a massive tsunami headed toward the United States.”

David Ludwig, MD

Pediatric Endocrinologist

Boston’s Children’s Hospital

slide168

Finally…

We must take care of our kids…

slide169

Questions…

Drew Bossen, PT, MBA

4191 Westcott Drive NE

Iowa City, IA 52240

Phone: 616-844-6322 Ext. 3202

Cell: 319-430-3382

Fax: 616-328-6768

Email:[email protected]

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