Creating a Model : Literacy and IEP Goals and Objectives  Topical Workshop Orlando, Florida

Creating a Model : Literacy and IEP Goals and Objectives Topical Workshop Orlando, Florida PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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OUTCOME NUMBERSSP.11and SP.12. SP.11 Use of strategies to improve cognitive developmentSP.12 Use of strategies to improve academic and/or literacy skillsSP.12.h, i,j,k,l,m. I will examine the basics... The goal is to develop and support a successful reader using a wide variety of literacy formats To share a model of relationships that are ALIGNED with:State wide curriculum ELA StandardsIEP Goals Outcomes (OPIs) ACROSS ALL Learning Environments for students who are deafblind.

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Creating a Model : Literacy and IEP Goals and Objectives Topical Workshop Orlando, Florida

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1. Creating a Model : Literacy and IEP Goals and Objectives Topical Workshop Orlando, Florida Martha M. Majors Assistant Educational Coordinator Deafblind Program Perkins School for the Blind

3. I will examine the basics.. The goal is to develop and support a successful reader using a wide variety of literacy formats To share a model of relationships that are ALIGNED with: State wide curriculum ELA Standards IEP Goals Outcomes (OPIs) ACROSS ALL Learning Environments for students who are deafblind

4. Literacy and Communication June references the relationship between communication and literacy. She refers to developing relationships Early access to reading and the impact that deafness has on content Shared experiences Students who are deafblind need these components on a daily basis Parents tell us they want the children to develop relationships and social skills so they can be successful as young adults living in a community setting

5. Early Beginnings of Literacy The historical perspective Redefining reading based on NCLB Looking at access and pre-requisite skills as a result of State-wide assessment expectations Expanding skills to raise the bar Integrating Literacy into the IEP

6. One Definition of Literacy Literacy is more than just the ability to “read” and “write.” “Literacy is an integrated process which develops gradually from birth and is built upon learning from broad experiences, linking language with the development of concepts, and providing exposure to the written word in a variety of meaningful contexts. (Wright, 1997)”

7. Functions of Literacy As students experience a wider variety of meaningful literacy materials their interest will increase. The student will most likely choose what is both fun and motivating, as well as functional. A student may: read a recipe or write a shopping list use tactile objects, symbols, large print, Braille choose to read an adapted magazine “write” in their journal during their leisure time. All of these functions can become skills based goals in the IEP

8. Literacy Similarities Again, June discusses types of literacy that Deirdre and Patti are presenting: Specifically, use of calendar system, checklist,”written directions”, journal writing,etc. using a variety of formats. These become a goal in the IEP related to matching, sorting, and sequencing

9. CURRICULUM COMMENTS Access to the general curriculum We are mandated to access it We must now teach using pre-established state wide curriculum standards We MUST remember that we are teaching students who are DEAFBLIND The challenge: to teach, to learn and to access curriculum that is: meaningful, appropriate, and functional for the student who is DEAFBLIND

10. Linking IEP to Curriculum and ELA/SP.12 Examples of Goals Linked to outcomes Examples of Objectives (part of Martha’s Matrix) Matching Sorting Sequencing Organizational skills Helping Out Access Skills

11. TEAMING Strategies The TEAM shares goals and objectives using a common VERB

12. For students who are DEAFBLIND ACCESS SKILLS are the basic skills needed in order to access all other concepts and skills throughout all curriculum content Skills necessary in order to access Literacy: Grasp and Release Using two hands together/Fine Motor 1:1 Correspondence Following simple 1 step direction Visual Motor….eye gaze

13. Beginning Literacy Skills Beginning Literacy Access Skills Use of Objects Grasp and Release Beginning skills in following a sequence 1:1 correspondence GOAL: To follow a sequence through use of a calendar system

14. For students who are DEAFBLIND MATCHING is the basic skill needed in order to access all other concepts and skills throughout all curriculum content The ability to MATCH is the first step when accessing Literacy: Matching objects, photos, pictures,line drawings ,MJ symbols, print/braille Matching letters Matching words Matching numbers 1:1 correspondence using a calendar/schedule

15. The basic concept for access to Literacy Grasp and release 1:1 correspondence (put in, match 1:1, beginning calendar system) Follow a sequence of objects, photos, pictures, MJ symbols, print/braille in ALL environments ALL = sequencing=ELA=Literacy= IEP goals

16. For students who are DEAFBLIND SEQUENCING supports their need for structure and routine and predictable events: Following directions(verbal, sign, MJ, print/braille, photos, line drawings) Putting letters in order Putting words in order Following a calendar/schedule

18. Students Following a Sequence: Literacy

19. LITERACY/TOTALLY BLIND Literacy Following a sequence in a Calendar System Use MJ Symbols, with tactile shapes, and braille

21. Curriculum Frameworks Content: English Language Arts Strand: Identify the basic facts and main ideas in a text Learning Standard: Retell a main event from the story Essence: Retell a main event; ask questions and answer questions, identify what will happen next

27. RESOURCES Koppenhaver, D. 2000. Literacy in AAC: What should be written on the envelope we push? Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 16, 270-279. Miles, B. 2000. Literacy for persons who are deaf-blind. Monmouth, OR: DB-LINK: Musslewhite, C. & King-DeBaun, P. (1997). Emergent Literacy Success: Merging Technology and Whole Language for Students with Disabilities. Park City, UT: Creative Communicating. The National Information Clearinghouse on Children Who Are Deaf-Blind. Downing, J. Teaching Literacy to Students with Significant Disabilities: Strategies for the K-12 Inclusive Classroom. Corwin Press, 2005

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