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ERD Memory Discussion. Victor Zhirnov April 10, 2011 Potsdam, Germany. ERD Memory Tasks. Update Memory Tables and Text Implement the decisions made at the 2010 ERD FFM as well as at the 2010 workshops in Barza and Tsukuba Status: work in progress 1 st draft (tables): April 2011

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Erd memory discussion

ERD Memory Discussion

Victor Zhirnov

April 10, 2011

Potsdam, Germany


Erd memory tasks

ERD Memory Tasks

  • Update Memory Tables and Text

    • Implement the decisions made at the 2010 ERD FFM as well as at the 2010 workshops in Barza and Tsukuba

      • Status: work in progress

      • 1st draft (tables): April 2011

      • Final draft (tables + text): July 1, 2011

  • Create new section on Storage Class Memory

    • Status: 1st draft completed

    • Final draft: April 2011

  • Create new section on Select Device

    • Status: 1st draft completed

    • A fundamental study is underway develop an analysis of nanoscale selector devices for memory

    • Final draft: July 1, 2011

    • Research paper: November 2011


Decisions for memory section dec 2 5 2010 erd meetings

Decisions for Memory Section (Dec. 2 & 5, 2010 ERD Meetings)

  • Put Vertical MOSFET in the Memory Section

  • Include new section on Storage Class Memory

  • Include new section on Select Device


Erd memory tables

ERD Memory Tables


2010 important events

2010 Important Events

  • Emerging Research Memory Devices Workshop

    • Barza, Italy, April 2, 2010

  • Emerging Memory Materials workshop  

    • Tsukuba, Japan, November 30, 2010


2009 erd memory table

2009 ERD Memory Table

PIDS

Redox Memory

Mott Memory


Summary stt ram 1 st place in voting

Summary : STT RAM– 1st Place in voting

  • Pros

  • Well defined physical Model and simulation tool.  Very fast improvement. Many chip level papers on IEDM, VLSI and ISSCC

  • No control device needed (for apple to apple comp. STT RAM vs. Other ReRAM w/ control device)

  • CMOS compatible and No HV ease of front end integration.

  • Extendibility : ~1uA Writing current @ 50ns speed ( 50nm diameter P –MTJ @IEDM2009) Even In plane MTJ can be extendible)

  • Scalable than PCRAM, Nanothermal and Nano electronic memory w.r.t write speed, endurance(>1E12) and retention.

  • 4F2 possible by vertical tr.(Currently ~21F2, 40nm and chip level)

  • MTJ can be extended to logic devices as an nonvolatile unit.

  • Cons

  • MLC operation and stacking is difficult

  • Very much process dependent :

  • - MgO dielectric Reliability ( subsequent temp. and etching )

  • - Thermal instability(< 150C) , different from single cell results.

  • - Even endurance as low as 1E7(chip level)

  • - Hc shift and stuck at 1 or 0 status.

  • - Variation

  • All parameters are related each other. Need to decouple(ex. retention , programming current, RA, TMR , endurance, speed), Keeping in mind memory is simple device.)

Much better developed technology than other ERD memory entries – time to migrate to PIDS


Nanothermal and nanoionic resistive switching memories a summary 2 nd place

Nanothermal and Nanoionic Resistive Switching Memories: A Summary – 2nd place

  • Classification

    • ‘Nanothermal’ and ‘Nanoinic’ often refer to the same mechanisms of resistive switching

    • Decision: To merge ‘Nanothermal’ and ‘Nanoionic’ in one category – RedOx Memory

  • Scaling properties

    • Based on fundamental physics, Nanothermal/Nanoionic memories may be scalable to 10 nm (and below), capable to fast (~ns) operation

  • Current Application Prospects

    • Unclear in the context of existing memory hierarchy

    • Incomplete understanding of operation mechanisms

    • Lack of predictive models etc.


2009 erd electronic effect resistive switching memories

2009 ERD:Electronic Effect Resistive Switching Memories

  • Charge trapping induced resistive switching

  • Resistive switching induced by Mott-transition

  • Ferroelectric resistive switching

    • Ferroelectric tunnel junction (FTJ)


Electronic effect resistive switching memories a summary

Electronic Effect Resistive Switching Memories: A Summary

  • Charge trapping induced resistive switching

    • A non-workable concept

    • Should not be considered in the future

  • Resistive switching induced by Mott-transition

    • Needs to be investigated under benchmark values

  • Ferroelectric resistive switching

    • Needs to be investigated under benchmark values

    • Issues: Retention, endurance fatigue, scalability


Ferroelectric resistive switching

Ferroelectric resistive switching

  • Interesting concept

    • Ferroelectric tunnel junction - FTJ

  • Not really “electronic effects memory”

    • Operation principle is based on ferroelectric polarization, similar to e.g. FeFET

    • Same difficult problems as in FeFET

      • Retention, endurance fatigue, scalability

  • Much smaller number of research papers compared to other types of ReRAM


Changes in the 2011 erd memory section

Changes in the 2011 ERD Memory section

  • To take out the “electronic effect memories” entry from the ERD memory table

  • The Ferroelectric Tunel Junction memory could be covered along with FeFET as a subcategory

    • Action Item: A new name for ERD ferroelectric memory entry is needed

  • Mott Memory will form a stand-alone entry


Resistive switching induced by mott transition an optimistic view

Resistive switching induced by Mott-transition: An optimistic view

  • Very interesting concept (believed by enthusiasts to be the ultimate solution for nanodevices)

Silicon-based contemporary electronic devices based on a naive electrostatic charging are reaching their miniaturization limits... Alternative ideas are craved: for example, using phase transitions rather than the charge storage…The ultimate resistance-change device is believed to exploit a purely electronic phase change such as the Mott transition…

I. H. Inoue and M. J. Rozenberg ,”Taming the Mott Transition for a Novel Mott Transistor”, Adv. Funct. Mater. 2008, 18, 2289–2292


Mott memory issues i research activity

Mott memory issues: I- Research Activity

  • Much smaller number of research papers compared to other types of ReRAM

    • Most of the papers are theoretical

  • In experiments, different conductive mechanisms may contribute to the resistive switching

    • Only a few experimental works presenting evidences for Mott transition

R. Fors, S. I. Khartsev, and A. M. Grishin, ‘Giant resistance switching in metal-insulator-manganite junctions: Evidence for Mott transition’ , PHYS. REV. B 71, 045305 (2005)


Mott memory issues ii scaling

Mott memory issues: II – Scaling

An Chen: Although switching devices on the scale of 200 nm has been shown to have the characteristics similar to these observed in larger devices, this size is far from being competitive to existing memory technologies. More research on the size effect of the Mott transition properties is needed to address the fundamental scaling limit of this type of devices.

  • Scaling of Mott devices might be a problem

    • What is the minimum number of atoms in a Mott memory element to provide retention and sensing properties?

  • Needs to be investigated under benchmark values


2011 erd memory table

2011 ERD Memory Table


Action item a new name for erd ferroelectric memory entry is needed

Action Item: A new name for ERD ferroelectric memory entry is needed

  • Combines two subcategories:

    • Ferroelectric FET

    • Ferroelectric tunnel junction

  • Should not be confused with conventional ferroelectric memory or FeRAM

    • Based on FE capacitor

    • Is currently in PIDS

  • Temporary working name:

    • Ferroelectric effects memory

    • Suggestions are welcome


Memory select device

Memory Select Device


Memory select device twg

Memory Select Device TWG:

Wei Lu (U Michigan)An Chen (GLOBALFND)

Kwok Ng (SRC)Victor Zhirnov (SRC)

The fundamental study team

Dirk Wouters (IMEC)

Rainer Waser (U Aachen) Thomas Vogelsang (RAMBUS) Zoran Krivokapic(GLOBALFND) Al Fazio (Intel)

Kyu Min (Intel)

U-In Chung (Samsung)

Matthew Marinella (Sandia Labs)


Reram

ReRAM

Select Device:

TransistorConventional approach

Diode

Other 2-terminal non-linear element?

Enables cell scaling to 4F2

Supports 3D-stacking

Potentially lower cost etc.


General remarks on memory select device

General remarks on Memory Select Device

  • The select device is a non-linear element, which can operate as a switch.

    • Typical examples: transistors (e.g. FET or BJT) or diodes.

    • Up to now, FET is commonly used as select device in practical memory arrays, such as DRAM or flash.

    • In order to achieve the highest planar array density of 4F2, without considerable overheads associated with vertical select FETs, passive memory arrays with two-terminal select device are currently actively investigated where two-terminal devices with switch-type behavior (e.g. diodes) are integrated in series with resistive storage nodes in a cross-bar array.


Suggested select device categories an chen gf

Suggested select device categories (An Chen/GF)


Transistor type select devices

Transistor-type select devices

  • In order to reach the highest possible 2-D memory density of 4F2, a vertical select transistor needs to be used

    • the approach being currently actively pursuit.

  • While vertical select transistor allows for the highest planar array density, this 4F2 technology is more difficult to integrate into stacked 3D memory, than the conventional 8F2 technology using planar FETs

    • to avoid thermal stress on the memory elements on the existing layers, the processing temperature of the vertical transistor as selection devices in 3D stacks has to be low, which is not available for high-quality transistors).

  • Also, making contact to the third terminal (gate) of vertical FET constitutes additional integration challenge.


Decisions for memory section dec 2 5 2010 erd meetings1

Decisions for Memory Section (Dec. 2 & 5, 2010 ERD Meetings)

OK

  • Put Vertical MOSFET in the Memory Section

  • Include new section on Storage Class Memory

  • Include new section on Select Device


Two terminal select device

Two-terminal Select Device

  • Diode-type select devices

    • pn-diode,

    • Schottky diode

    • and heterojunction diode

    • Zener or avalanche diodes.

  • Resistive-Switch-type select devices

    • innovative device concepts that exhibit resistive switching behavior.

    • in some of these concepts the device structure/physics of operation is similar to the structure of the storage node.

    • A modified memory element could act as select device!

      • a ‘nonvolatile’ switch is required for the storage node, while for select device depending on the approaches non-volatility may not be necessary and can sometimes be detrimental.

Unipolar cell

Bipolar cell


Selection device benchmarking

Selection Device Benchmarking

  • ‘Waser 2010’ (individual cell-based)

    • Von ~ 1 Volt

    • Ion min ~ 1 mA

    • Jon ~106 A/cm2 for L~10 nm

  • ‘Hwang 2010’( cross bar array with a 1-100 Mb block density)

    • Von ~ 1-5 Volt

    • Jon ~ 105 – 106 A/cm2

    • ON/OFF > 107-108

H. Schroeder, V. V. Zhirnov, R. K. Cavin, and R. Waser, “Voltage-time dilemma of pure electronic mechanisms in resistive switching memory cells ”, J. Appl. Phys. 107 (2010) 054517

G. H. Kim, K. M. Kim, J. Y. Seok, H. J. Lee, D-Y. Cho, J. H. Han and C. S. Hwang, “A theoretical model for Schottky diodes for excluding the sneak current in cross bar array resistive memory”, Nanotechnology 21 (2010) 385202


Resistive switch type select devices i

Resistive-Switch-type select devices I

  • Mott-transition switch

    • is based on the Mott Metal-Insulator transition

    • a volatile resistive switch,

    • A VO2-based Mott-transition device has been demonstrated as a selection device for NiOx RRAM element [Ref: M.J. Lee, “Two Series Oxide Resistors Applicable to High Speed and High Density Nonvolatile Memory,” Adv. Mater. 19, 3919 (2007).].

    • The feasibility of the Mott-transition switch as selection devices still needs further research.

  • Threshold switch

    • is based the threshold switching in MIM structures caused by electronic charge injection/trapping

    • Significant resistance reduction can occur at a threshold voltage and this low-resistance state quickly recovers to the original high-resistance state when the applied voltage falls below a holding voltage.


Resistive switch type select devices ii

Resistive-Switch-type select devices II

  • MIEC switch

    • observed in materials that conduct both ions and electronic charges – so called mixed ionic electronic conduction materials (MIEC).

    • The resistive switching mechanism is similar to the ionic memories.

  • Complementary resistive switch

    • the memory cell is composed of two identical non-volatile ReRAM switches connected back-to-back.

    • Example: Pt/GeSe/Cu/GeSe/Pt structure

    • Electrically, it can be represented by a antiserial connections of two intrinsic Schottky diodes, which are formed at the contact sides of both cells

    • Can be placed into the category of Diode-type select devices


Erd memory discussion

Diode-type select devices


Erd memory discussion

Resistive-Switch-type select devices

Source: Philip Wong / Stanford


Criteria for the evaluation of selection devices an chen gf

Criteria for the evaluation of selection devices (An Chen/GF)


Scaling limits of two terminal semiconductor non linear elements

Scaling limits of two-terminal semiconductor non-linear elements

Victor Zhirnov1, Kwok Ng1, An Chen2, Wei Lu3

1Semiconductor Research Corporation

2GlobalFoundaries

3University of Michigan


2 terminal selector devices

I

V

2-terminal selector devices

  • External selecting device OR storage element with inherent rectifying/isolation properties

    • 2-terminal structure with non-linear characteristics

      • e.g. switching diode-type behavior for unipolar memory cells

      • for bipolar cells, selectors with two-way switching behavior are needed, e.g. Zener diode, avalanche diode etc.

ION1

ON2

ION

OFF

ON1

OFF

unipolar

bipolar


Selection device benchmarking1

Selection Device Benchmarking

  • ‘Waser 2010’ (individual cell-based)

    • Von ~ 1 Volt

    • Ion min ~ 1 mA

    • Jon ~106 A/cm2 for L~10 nm

  • ‘Hwang 2010’( cross bar array with a 1-100 Mb block density)

    • Von ~ 1-5 Volt

    • Jon ~ 105 – 106 A/cm2

    • ON/OFF > 107-108

H. Schroeder, V. V. Zhirnov, R. K. Cavin, and R. Waser, “Voltage-time dilemma of pure electronic mechanisms in resistive switching memory cells ”, J. Appl. Phys. 107 (2010) 054517

G. H. Kim, K. M. Kim, J. Y. Seok, H. J. Lee, D-Y. Cho, J. H. Han and C. S. Hwang, “A theoretical model for Schottky diodes for excluding the sneak current in cross bar array resistive memory”, Nanotechnology 21 (2010) 385202


I scaling limits of the schottky diodes

I. Scaling Limits of the Schottky Diodes

Energy barriers (Schottky barriers) are formed at the metal-semiconductor (insulator) interfaces

space charge formation in the interface region

If the barrier profile is known, the calculation of the current passing through the barrier is straightforward based on the thermionic and tunneling equations


Excel based home made diode model a calibration

Excel-based home-made diode model: A calibration

C.Y. Chang, Y. K. Fang, and S. M. Sze, “Specific contact resistance of metal-semiconductor barriers”, Soli-State Electron. 14 (1971) 541-550


Scaling limitation reduction of the effective conduction area due to side depletion

Scaling limitation: Reduction of the effective conduction area due to side depletion

  • If finite lateral dimensions of a 3-dimensional semiconductor structure are considered, the side interfaces can also effect the current flow.

    • Band bending/barrier formation usually occurs at these interfaces, and they need to be taken into account.

    • The band bending results in either depletion (bent up) or accumulation (bent down), and correspondingly, a layer with lower (depletion) or higher (accumulation) conductivity of width WSV is formed.

  • Therefore, in addition to the depletion WMS layer aligned with the direction of current (‘active’ interface, modulated by external stimulus), there is a lateral depletion layer WSV perpendicular to the current flow (‘passive’ interface, which remains more or less stable during device operation).

    • This ‘passive’ side interface may also effect the total current. If a depletion high-resistive layer of width WSV is formed, the effective cross-sectional area for modulated current flow is decreased.

    • In the case of an accumulation low-resistive layer, a parasitic surface resistor will be formed in parallel with the resistive memory element.


Reduction of the effective conduction area due to side depletion

Reduction of the effective conduction area due to side depletion

Imin=1 mA

WSV

WSV

Lmin>2W0

L  Nd


Scaling limits of diodes

Scaling Limits of Diodes

Me

Me

Si

Nd≤NC

pn-diode  Esaki tunnel diode

NdNC

Schottky diode  Ohmic contact

NC – effective density of states in the conduction band, for Si NC=2.8x1019 cm-3


Schottky diode reverse current

Schottky diode reverse current

V=1 Volt

N=5×1018 cm-3


Schottky diode reverse current1

Schottky diode reverse current

V=1 Volt

N=1019 cm-3


Schottky diode reverse current2

Schottky diode reverse current

V=1 Volt

N=2.8×1019 cm-3

OFF current increases with doping

OFF current increases with scaling


Germanium schottky diodes

Germanium Schottky diodes

NC=1.04x1019 cm-3

‘Relaxed’ case:

Extreme scaling:

L=500 nm

Nd=NC and Von= 1 volt

Nd=1018 cm-3

W0=8.7 nm

W0=31 nm

Lmin=20 nm (Ion~ 1mA)

Ion~ 2 mA

ON/OFF ~ 105

ON/OFF ~ 105

Voff= 1 volt


Silicon schottky diodes

Silicon Schottky diodes

NC=2.8x1019 cm-3

‘Relaxed’ case:

Extreme scaling:

L=300 nm

Nd=NC and Von= 1 volt

Nd=1018 cm-3

W0=6.2 nm

W0=31 nm

Lmin=14 nm (Ion~ 1mA)

Ion~ 260 mA

ON/OFF ~ 1010

ON/OFF ~ 107

Voff= 1 volt


Erd memory discussion

ON/OFFmax=105

Lmin=20 nm

ON/OFFmax=107

Lmin=14 nm


Action items for april 2011

Action Items for April 2011

  • To complete assessments for pn-diodes, Schottky diodes, and heterojucntion diodes

    • To find experimental reports on smallest diodes

  • To begin studies of Zener and avalanche diodes and other concepts

  • To begin studies of the resistive switch-type select devices

    • May have better scaling properties than diode-type devices


Selection devices summary

Selection Devices Summary

  • Experimental selecting devices have yet to meet the benchmark specifications

    • Hence, outstanding research issues persist

    • 2011 SD table and text will reflect both target parameters and experimental status

  • More detailed benchmarking and further analysis is currently underway


Timeline milestones

Timeline & Milestones

  • April 5 – A draft section (~ 2 paragraphs + 1 Table) for the ITRS ERD chapter

  • April 10 – ITRS meeting in Potsdam, Germany

  • July 1 - presentation draft for the ITRS meeting in SF

  • July 9 – ITRS meeting in SF

    • Wei Lu will present a technical presentation with a summary of our findings

  • Aug. 1 – Final materials on SD for ITRS ERD Chapter

  • Nov. 1 – Research paper manuscript draft complete


  • Solid state storage class memory

    Solid-State Storage Class Memory


    Scm team

    SCM Team:

    Barry Schechtman (INSIC)Rod Bowman (Seagate)Geoff Burr (IBM)Bob Fontana (IBM)Michele Franceschini (IBM)

    Rich Freitas (IBM)Kevin Gomez (Seagate)Mark Kryder (CMU)Yale Ma (Seagate)Kroum Stoev (Western Digital)Winfried Wilcke (IBM)

    Thomas Vogelsang (RAMBUS)

    Matthew Marinella (Sandia Labs)Jim Hutchby (SRC)Victor Zhirnov (SRC)


    Storage class memory scm

    Storage-class memory (SCM)

    • Research and development efforts are underway worldwide on several nonvolatile memory technologies that not only complement the existing memory but also reduce the distinction between memory and storage1

      • Memory: fast, evanescent, random-access, expensive

      • Storage: slow, permanent, sequential-access, inexpensive

    • Storage-class memory (SCM): Emerging solid-state technologies with (some) attributes of both memory and storage devices

      • May eventually replace discs and (perhaps) DRAM1

        1 “Storage-class memory: The next storage system technology”, by R. F. Freitas and W. W. Wilcke, IBM J. Res. & Dev. 52 (2008) 439


    Scm candidates 2 and their relation to itrs erd chapter

    SCM candidates2 and their relation to ITRS ERD chapter

    • FeFET

    • ReRAM

    • Solid Electrolyte

    • Organic …

    2“Overview of candidate device technologies for storage-class memory”, by G. W. Burr et al, IBM J. Res. & Dev. 52 (2008) 449

    Many of the current SCM candidates are currently present in the ITRS as memory technologies. Their potential for SCM could be included within the existing framework, e.g. as an additional table row and corresponding discussion in text.

    2009 Decision: ITRS ERD will include storage-class memory (SCM) in ERD chapter


    Draft section on scm is available

    Draft section on SCM is Available

    • Storage-class memory (SCM) describes a device category that combines the benefits of solid-state memory, such as high performance and robustness, with the archival capabilities and low cost of conventional hard-disk magnetic storage.

      • Such a device requires a nonvolatile memory technology that could be manufactured at a very low cost per bit.

    • As the scalability of flash is approaching its limit, emerging technologies for non-volatile memories need to be investigated for a potential “take over” of the scaling roadmap for flash.

    • In principle, such new SCM technology could engender two entirely new and distinct levels within the memory and storage hierarchy, located below off-chip DRAM and above mechanical storage, and differentiated from each other by access time.


    I s type storage class memory

    I. S-type storage-class memory

    • The first new level, identified as S-type storage-class memory (S-SCM), would serve as a high-performance solid-state drive

      • accessed by the system I/O controller much like an HDD.

      • S-SCM would need to provide at least the same data retention as flash,

      • offering new direct overwrite and random access capabilities (which can lead to improved performance and simpler systems)

      • However, it would be absolutely critical that the device cost for S-SCM be no more than 1.5-2x higher than NAND flash

      • If the cost per bit could be driven low enough through ultrahigh memory density, ultimately such an S-SCM device could potentially replace magnetic hard-disk drives in enterprise storage server systems.


    Ii m type storage class memory

    II. M-type storage-class memory

    • M-SCM:

      • should offer a read/write latency of less than 1 ms.

        • would allow it to remain synchronous with a memory system, allowing direct connection from a memory controller and bypassing the inefficiencies of access through the I/O controller.

    • Would be to augment a small amount of DRAM to provide the same overall system performance as a DRAM-only system, while providing

      • Moderate retention,

      • Lower power-per-GB and lower cost-per-GB than DRAM.

      • Endurance is particularly critical

        • the time available for wear-leveling, error-correction, and other similar techniques is limited

          • > 109 cycles


    Target device and system specifications for scm

    Target device and system specifications for SCM

    [1] The endurance of the chip shouldn't be confused with the endurance of an entire SSDisk, once wear-level is employed.

    [2] Power was not covered in any detail: TBD

    Action item: All numbers need to be carefully reviewed


    Scm section in 2011 erd

    SCM section in 2011 ERD

    • 2011: Additional rows in the Emerging Research Memory Table

      • Potential of current technology entries for storage-class memory

      • Corresponding discussion in text

      • Critical parameters:

    • Scalability

    • Multilevel Cell - MLC (MLC vs extreme scaling dilemma)

    • 3D integration (stacking)

    • Fabrications costs

    • Endurance (for M-SCM)

    • Power

  • The driving issue is to minimize the cost per bit


  • Potential of the current emerging research memory candidates for scm applications

    Potential of the current emerging research memory candidates for SCM applications

    Action item 1: Corresponding discussion needs to be added to the memory text

    Action item 2: Decision is needed on how inclusive the SCM section should be:

    Should it be limited by ERD devices (table above)?

    OR

    It should include other, more matured devices, e.g.

    PCM, STT-MRAM, etc.?


    Action items for memory dec 2 5 2010 erd meetings

    Action Items for Memory (Dec. 2 & 5, 2010, ERD Meetings)

    • Should Storage Class Memory drive a new architecture discussion in the Architecture Section?

    • Advances in SCM could drive the emerging data-centric chip architectures

      • Nanostores

    • Nanostores architectures could be an important direction for the future of information processing.

    Computer, Jan. 2011


    Decisions for memory section dec 2 5 2010 erd meetings2

    Decisions for Memory Section (Dec. 2 & 5, 2010 ERD Meetings)

    OK

    • Put Vertical MOSFET in the Memory Section

    • Include new section on Storage Class Memory

    • Include new section on Select Device

    OK

    OK

    OK

    OK

    OK


    Erd memory tasks1

    ERD Memory Tasks

    • Update Memory Tables and Text

      • Implement the decisions made at the 2010 ERD FFMa s wel as at the 2010 workshops in Barza and Tsukuba

        • Status: work in progress

        • 1st draft (tables): April 2011

        • Final draft (tables + text): July 1, 2011

    • Create new section on Storage Class Memory

      • Status: 1st draft completed

      • Final draft: April 2011

    • Create new section on Select Device

      • Status:A fundamental study is underway develop an analysis of nanoscale selector devices for memory

      • 1st draft: April 2011

      • Final draft: July 1, 2011

      • Research paper: November 2011


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