Hiv aids control in resource poor settings or why the abcs are failing the african woman
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 7

HIV/AIDS Control in resource-poor settings, or why the ABCs are failing the African Woman: PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 51 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

HIV/AIDS Control in resource-poor settings, or why the ABCs are failing the African Woman:. Francoise Welter Policy Coordinator, GNP+ In grateful acknowledgement to Dr. Paul Pronyk of the Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Download Presentation

HIV/AIDS Control in resource-poor settings, or why the ABCs are failing the African Woman:

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Hiv aids control in resource poor settings or why the abcs are failing the african woman

HIV/AIDS Control in resource-poor settings, or why the ABCs are failing the African Woman:

Francoise Welter

Policy Coordinator, GNP+

In grateful acknowledgement to

Dr. Paul Pronyk of the Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine


Hiv and development

HIV and development

Eastern Europe & Central Asia

1.8 million

Western Europe

680 000

North America

1.2 million

East Asia & Pacific

1.3 million

North Africa

& Middle East

730 000

South

& South-East Asia

8.2 million

Caribbean

590 000

Sub-Saharan Africa

28.2 million

Latin America

1.9 million

Australia

& New Zealand

18 000

2003 Total : 35-45 million

99000-E-1 – 1 December 1999


Structural factors driving the hiv epidemic parker 2000

Structural factors driving the HIV epidemic: (Parker, 2000)

Poverty and underdevelopment

Sexual Behaviour

HIV infection

Gender Inequalities

Mobility and migration


Hiv aids control in resource poor settings or why the abcs are failing the african woman

In sub-Saharan Africa, there are 13 women infected for every 10 men. Among teens, rates among girls 5 times higher than boys(UNAIDS 2000)

Men

Women

HIV prevalence in women attending antenatal clinics by age, South Africa, 2000

Women’s economic vulnerabilityanddependence on men

increases their vulnerability to HIV by constraining their ability to

negotiate condom use, discuss fidelity, or leave risky relationships

(Gupta, BMJ 2002)


Putting and keeping yp in school

Putting and Keeping YP in School

  • Streets are unsafe for YP

  • YP are safer in schools. That said, being in school does not automatically reduce risk and vulnerability because sex –consenting or coercive- is taking place in schools.

  • Therefore, urgent need for comprehensive sex ed.

  • Higher educational levels associated with higher rates of condom use

  • YP are not in school 24 hours a day, there is urgent need for measures from schools and other authorities to address the needs of YP outside the classroom

  • According to UNFPA, each additional s/y results in 5-10% drop in child deaths; & each 1% increase in female schooling, with a 0.3% increase in national economic growth.


Finally

Finally,

  • Until a fully woman-controlled prevention method is available, many women will be unable to take control of prevention.

  • Microbicides are a heaven sent opportunity, but only if they challenge the gender inequality and are available to every woman who needs them. We, the stakeholders, must make sure that every woman living on the streets of Kampala, every commercial sex worker in Nairobi, every female trader in Lilongwe, every illiterate woman in Kigali, every domestic in Johannesburg has free access to microbicides.

  • It is also my personal plea that research into microbicides actively considers the HIV positive woman. We all know the importance of positive prevention, especially in settings with poor access to treatment. Microbicides would allow HIV positive women in developing countries to prevent both repeated re-infections, but also transmissions to others.

  • My heartfelt thanks to Dr. Paul Pronyk of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine for the slides and the inspiration

  • Thank you.


  • Login