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Warm-Up – 1/10 – 10 minutes. Utilizing your notes and past knowledge answer the following questions: From a pilot’s perspective, what is the direction of the yaw and what do we refer to this type of motion? How do you counter the effects of adverse ya w?

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Warm-Up – 1/10 – 10 minutes

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Warm-Up – 1/10 – 10 minutes

Utilizing your notes and past knowledge answer the following questions:

  • From a pilot’s perspective, what is the direction of the yaw and what do we refer to this type of motion?

  • How do you counter the effects of adverse yaw?

  • What must a pilot do to maintain steady altitude during a roll or bank of an aircraft?

  • In an aircraft with a T-tail configuration during normal flight conditions, what effects are removed from influencing the elevator?

  • At slow speeds, the elevator on a T-tail aircraft must be moved through a (larger or smaller)number of degrees of travel to raise the nose the same amount as on a conventional aircraft.


Questions / Comments


Warm-Up – 1/10 – 10 minutes

Utilizing your notes and past knowledge answer the following questions:

  • From a pilot’s perspective, what is the direction of the yaw and what do we refer to this type of motion?

  • How do you counter the effects of adverse yaw?

  • What must a pilot do to maintain steady altitude during a roll or bank of an aircraft?

  • In an aircraft with a T-tail configuration during normal flight conditions, what effects are removed from influencing the elevator?

  • At slow speeds, the elevator on a T-tail aircraft must be moved through a (larger or smaller) number of degrees of travel to raise the nose the same amount as on a conventional aircraft.


Flight Control SystemsAdverse Yaw

  • This results in the aircraft yawing toward the wing which had experienced an increase in lift (and drag).

  • From the pilot’s perspective, the yaw is opposite the direction of the bank.


Warm-Up – 1/10 – 10 minutes

Utilizing your notes and past knowledge answer the following questions:

  • From a pilot’s perspective, what is the direction of the yaw and what do we refer to this type of motion?

  • How do you counter the effects of adverse yaw?

  • What must a pilot do to maintain steady altitude during a roll or bank of an aircraft?

  • In an aircraft with a T-tail configuration during normal flight conditions, what effects are removed from influencing the elevator?

  • At slow speeds, the elevator on a T-tail aircraft must be moved through a (larger or smaller) number of degrees of travel to raise the nose the same amount as on a conventional aircraft.


Flight Control SystemsAdverse Yaw

  • Application of rudder is used to counteract adverse yaw.

  • The amount of rudder control required is greatest at low airspeeds, high angles of attack, and with large aileron deflections.


Warm-Up – 1/10 – 10 minutes

Utilizing your notes and past knowledge answer the following questions:

  • From a pilot’s perspective, what is the direction of the yaw and what do we refer to this type of motion?

  • How do you counter the effects of adverse yaw?

  • What must a pilot do to maintain steady altitude during a roll or bank of an aircraft?

  • In an aircraft with a T-tail configuration during normal flight conditions, what effects are removed from influencing the elevator?

  • At slow speeds, the elevator on a T-tail aircraft must be moved through a (larger or smaller) number of degrees of travel to raise the nose the same amount as on a conventional aircraft.


Flight Control SystemsAdverse Yaw

  • Additionally, because more lift is required during a turn than when in straight-and-level flight, the angle of attack (AOA) must be increased by applying elevator back pressure.


Warm-Up – 1/10 – 10 minutes

Utilizing your notes and past knowledge answer the following questions:

  • From a pilot’s perspective, what is the direction of the yaw and what do we refer to this type of motion?

  • How do you counter the effects of adverse yaw?

  • What must a pilot do to maintain steady altitude during a roll or bank of an aircraft?

  • In an aircraft with a T-tail configuration during normal flight conditions, what effects are removed from influencing the elevator?

  • At slow speeds, the elevator on a T-tail aircraft must be moved through a (larger or smaller) number of degrees of travel to raise the nose the same amount as on a conventional aircraft.


Flight Control SystemsT-Tail

  • In a T-tail configuration, the elevator is above most of the effects of downwash from the propeller as well as airflow around the fuselage and/or wings during normal flight conditions.


Warm-Up – 1/10 – 10 minutes

Utilizing your notes and past knowledge answer the following questions:

  • From a pilot’s perspective, what is the direction of the yaw and what do we refer to this type of motion?

  • How do you counter the effects of adverse yaw?

  • What must a pilot do to maintain steady altitude during a roll or bank of an aircraft?

  • In an aircraft with a T-tail configuration during normal flight conditions, what effects are removed from influencing the elevator?

  • At slow speeds, the elevator on a T-tail aircraft must be moved through a (larger or smaller)number of degrees of travel to raise the nose the same amount as on a conventional aircraft.


Flight Control SystemsT-Tail

  • An additional benefit is reduced vibration and noise inside the aircraft.

  • At slow speeds, the elevator on a T-tail aircraft must be moved through a larger number of degrees of travel to raise the nose a given amount than on a conventional-tail aircraft.


Questions / Comments


THIS DAY IN AVIATION

  • January 10

  • In 1942... The US Army announces the delivery of its first troop-transport gliders.


THIS DAY IN AVIATION

  • January 10

  • In 1982... The Gulfstream III Spirit of America sets a round-the-world record for an executive jet of 43 hours, 39 minutes and 6 seconds in Taterboro, New Jersey.


THIS DAY IN AVIATION

  • January 8

  • 1982 — The Airbus A300 becomes the world's first wide-bodied airliner to be certified for operation by a flight crew of two.


Questions / Comments


January 2014


Questions / Comments


Chapter 5 – Flight Controls

FAA – Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge


Today’s Mission Requirements

  • Mission:

  • Identify in writing the flight control systems a pilot uses to control the forces of flight, and the aircraft’s direction and attitude.

  • Describe how the flight control systems and characteristics can vary greatly depending on the type of aircraft flown.

  • Describe in writing the basic flight control system designs.

  • EQ:

    Describe the importance of Aeronautical Knowledge for the student pilot learning to fly.


Flight Control SystemsT-Tail

  • This is because the conventional-tail aircraft has the downwash from the propeller pushing down on the tail to assist in raising the nose.


Flight Control SystemsT-Tail

  • The forces required to raise the nose of a T-tail aircraft are greater than those for a conventional-tail aircraft.

  • The pilot must be aware that the required control forces are greater at slow speeds during takeoffs, landings, or stalls than for similar size aircraft equipped with conventional tails.


Flight Control SystemsT-Tail

  • When flying at a very high AOA with a low airspeed and an aft CG, the T-tail aircraft may be susceptible to a deep stall.

  • In a deep stall, the airflow over the horizontal tail is blanketed by the disturbed airflow from the wings and fuselage.


Flight Control SystemsT-Tail

  • In these circumstances, elevator or stabilator control could be diminished, making it difficult to recover from the stall.


Flight Control SystemsStabilator

  • A stabilator is a one-piece horizontal stabilizer that pivots from a central hinge point.


Flight Control SystemsStabilator

  • Becausestabilatorspivot around a central hinge point, they are extremely sensitive to control inputs and aerodynamic loads.

  • Antiservotabs are incorporated on the trailing edge to decrease sensitivity.


Flight Control SystemsStabilator

  • They deflect in the same direction as the stabilator.

  • This results in an increase in the force required to move the stabilator, thus making it less prone to pilot-induced overcontrolling.


Questions / Comments


Chapter 5 – Flight Controls

FAA – Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Chapter 5

Quiz

Passcode

1369


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