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LESSON PREPARATION. Calculators Note pages copies. Copies of Numeric value chart for student binders Print 10 copies of group participation rubric w academic language. MAKING INFERENCES. Types of Inferences. Standard 2: Reading for all purposes. Objectives 10:38.

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LESSON PREPARATION

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Lesson preparation

LESSON PREPARATION

  • Calculators

  • Note pages copies.

  • Copies of Numeric value chart for student binders

  • Print 10 copies of group participation rubric w academic language


Making inferences

MAKING INFERENCES

Types of Inferences


Objectives 10 38

Standard 2: Reading for all purposes

Objectives 10:38

  • Students will compose sentences with inferred messages/themes based on student-choice categories.

  • Students will make inferences from a combination of text clues and previous knowledge.

  • Students will explore typesof inferences related to time (dates)and data.


Bellwork

10:42-10:47

Bellwork

Create categories for the following images.

Discuss your ideas with your right shoulder partner.

Together, write a message about an image or category.

Choose teammate to report.

Remember! It’s subjective. There’s no right or wrong answer.

Palm Trees

OCEAN

MAN ASLEEP

WINGS


1 min review this is how we categorized the following numeric values in previous lesson

10:45 – 10:50

1 min. Review!This is how we categorized the following numeric values in previous lesson.


Major inference types

Standard 2: Reading for all purposes

10:50 – 10:51

Major Inference Types

  • Predictions 

  • Setting, Location, Event

  • Time, Data, Statistics (Numbers)

  • Emotions, Traits, Qualities

  • Metaphors, Analogies

  • Categories


Lesson preparation

Standard 2: Reading for all purposes

10:51 – 10:52

Major Inference Vocab – Choose 1 or 2 new words from below that you haven’t used previously. These are your words for today’s class/team discussions and for discussions in other classes. You will receive a score based on your use of academic language during your discussions. See rubric.

concludededucesuppose

hypothesizespeculateassume

suggestsurmisehint suspectreckonreasonpresumeinterpretimplysupposefigure out insinuateguessimagineinterpret

determineinfer

“read between the lines”


Objectives

Standard 2: Reading for all purposes

Objectives

10:52 – 10:53

  • Students will compose sentences with inferred messages/themes based on student-choice categories.

  • Students will make inferences from a combination of text clues and previous knowledge.

  • Students will explore typesof inferences related to time and data.


Lesson preparation

Standard 2: Reading for all purposes 11:18 – 11:25

I DO

“Iraq's economy shows signs of growth”

One inference I can make from this article’s data about Iraq is…

One inference I can make from about Baghdad is…

Use your academic language in your discussions (see rubric).

P.S. You can also use the information in article’s DATE to help you make more inferences.

Iraq has boosted oil production to 3 million barrels a day with the help of international oil companies. That's up from the 2.5 million barrels before the 2003 U.S.-led invasion.

The streets of Baghdad, Iraq’s capital, are jammed with late-model cars, and restaurants and cafes are open well into the night.


Time data statistics

Standard 2: Reading for all purposes15 min.

TIME, DATA, STATISTICS

WE DO: Let’s try one together. What inferences can we make about the following stats:

Raise Your Hands!

  • Kathmandu, Nepal: The total number of tourists by air (Jan – Dec, 2012), compared to same period in 2011, have increased by almost 10 percent to 598,204.

    Let’s use our sentence frames/inference words:

    * What is being implied (inferred) in the phrase by air? How do we know?

    * Time is being suggested (inferred) in the above statistics? What time span is involved? How much of a time span?

Same period in 2011, meaning Jan – Dec 2011

A year’s time span.


Time data statistics1

Standard 2: Reading for all purposes15 min.

TIME, DATA, STATISTICS

WE DO: Let’s try one together. Raise Your Hands!

  • Kathmandu, Nepal: The total number of tourists by air (Jan – Dec, 2012), compared to same period in 2011, have increased by almost 10 percent to 598,204.

    *Analyze the data/statistics above. Data is being hinted (inferred). Based on the given information (text clues), combined with (our background knowledge in math), what hidden data can we uncover?

    What was the number of tourists by air in 2011? Does the passage give us enough clues to make this inference?

    Yes! We need to use (text clues) and our background knowledge of math to figure it out.

    With your table group, discuss which inference clues in the passage can help you figure out the answer, and then attempt to find the solution.


Time data statistics2

Standard 2: Reading for all purposes15 min.

TIME, DATA, STATISTICS

WE DO: Let’s try one together. Raise Your Hands!

  • Kathmandu, Nepal: The total number of tourists by air (Jan – Dec, 2012), compared to same period in 2011, have increased by almost 10 percent to 598,204.

    What was the number of tourists by air in 2011?

    First, what is 10 percent of 598,204? (See demonstration back board)

    _____________________________ (is / of / % triangle)

    Now we take that amount (round it off) and subtract it from 598,204. 598,204 – 59,820 = ______________ tourists in 2011.

    How many more visitors were there in 2012?

Answers:

The total tourist in 2012 were 598,204 that was 59,820 more visitors in same period (Jan-Dec) of 2011. Also, the number of tourists in 2011 was approximately 538,384.


Time data statistics3

Standard 2: Reading for all purposes5min.

TIME, DATA, STATISTICS

YOUR TURN! Groups!

For your exit ticket, what information can be figured out (inferred) from the text below though it doesn’t directly state it? (time/statistics)(1 pt. for each correct inference):

You must begin each answer with an inference phrase. You may use the following suggestions or use your own from your list.

The data implies /infers _________________ .

I conclude / I have determined ___________________ .

A’s: Back in 1950, the United Nations claimed that there were 28,264,000 people living in Vietnam. By 1955, those numbers had swelled significantly to 31,329,000.

B&C’s: An estimate puts the Vietnam population in 2012 at 91,519,289; in 2013 that number grew to 91,949,482, making the country the 13th most populous on the planet. However, Vietnamonly has a small surface area and at 128,565 square miles.


Objectives 1 min

Standard 2: Reading for all purposes

Objectives 1 min.

  • Students will compose sentences with inferred messages/themes based on student-choice categories.

  • Students will make inferences from a combination of text clues and previous knowledge.

  • Students will explore typesof inferences related to time and data.


Time data stats exit ticket

Standard 2: Reading for all purposes 11:15 – 11:20

Time, Data, StatsEXIT TICKET

What is 1 inference you can make from this article’s data: Puerto Ricans fleeing debt battle

Tuesday, 3 December 2013

Use your academic language in your discussions (see rubric).

A’s: Since 1996, the number of factory jobs in Puerto Rico has plummeted from 160,000 to 75,000.

B’s & C’s: Puerto Rico lost 54,000 residents – 1.5% of its population – between 2010 and 2012 alone. Since recession struck in 2006, the population has shrunk by more than 138,000 to 3.7 million, with the vast majority of the outflow headed to the mainland.

A’s, B’s, C’s: Mexico: As a consequence, employment in the maquiladora industry is down 20 percent from its peak in October 2000, when 1.3 million workers were employed.


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