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Mme Sally WYATT ROYAL NETHERLANDS ACADEMY & MAASTRICHT UNIVERSITY PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Mme Sally WYATT ROYAL NETHERLANDS ACADEMY & MAASTRICHT UNIVERSITY. Santé, internet, information. Intermediary – transports meaning without transformation – a black box counting for one

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Mme Sally WYATT ROYAL NETHERLANDS ACADEMY & MAASTRICHT UNIVERSITY

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Mme sally wyatt royal netherlands academy maastricht university

Mme Sally WYATT

ROYAL NETHERLANDS ACADEMY & MAASTRICHT UNIVERSITY


Mme sally wyatt royal netherlands academy maastricht university

Santé, internet, information


Mme sally wyatt royal netherlands academy maastricht university

Intermediary – transports meaning without transformation – a black box counting for one

Mediators – input never a good predictor of output – they transform, translate, distort & modify – however simple it may look, it can lead in multiple directions

Bruno Latour (2005:39) Reassembling the Social, OUP.


The clean pipeline idealised view of information intermediaries

The clean pipeline: idealised view of information intermediaries


The messy reality of finding health information

The messy reality of finding health information


Mme sally wyatt royal netherlands academy maastricht university

  • Alternative health care information

  • Commercial product information

  • Commonly -held beliefs (‘folk remedies’, etc.)

  • Conjecture

  • Epidemiologic data

  • Experience of others

  • Government policy

  • Medical information

  • Opinions

  • Own embodied experience

  • Pharmaceutical product information

  • Research/scientific evidence

  • Superstition

  • Beauty and& fitness industry

  • Health food industry

Sources of Health Information

Health Info(r)mediators

Health Information Seekers’ Needs

  • Legal regimes, policies

  • Western medical care providers, including pharmacists

  • Allied health care (& social service) providers

  • Complementary & alternative health care providers

  • Traditional healers

  • Peer / para-professional support workers

  • Libraries, librarians & other information professionals

  • Newspapers, magazines & other print media

  • Television, radio & other broadcast media

  • Health information websites & portals

  • Online social support sites

  • Friends & family

  • Medical images, electronic health records & other health informatics applications

  • Filters, search engines & other software applications

How does the information match my previous knowledge?

How badly do I need the information?

What do I need it for? (e.g., making a specific decision; emotional support; corroboration of a diagnosis; etc.).

Is the information consistent with my beliefs and values?

How urgent is the situation?

How familiar am I with the topic?

How easy is it to apply the information to my situation?

Am I ready to believe what I find? Am I ready to act on it?

Do I the need information for myself or another person?


Mme sally wyatt royal netherlands academy maastricht university

Info(r)mediators – visibility continuum

VISIBLE

INVISIBLE

Librarians

Legal Regimes

Libraries

Friends, family, etc.

Internet Search Engines

Health Care Providers

Internet Content Filters

Diagnostic Images

Community Health Workers

Websites


Emergence of the informed patient

Types of health information seeker

Band-aid internet use

Looking up/checking out

Doing research

Constraints experienced by patients

Patients reluctant to take on role

Lack of skills and competences for information literacy

Health care professionals reluctant to let patients take on role

What does this mean for policy agenda about ‘information for choice’?

Emergence of the informed patient?


Web 2 0

New patient responsibilities

Sharing health information

Sharing health experiences

Sharing experiences of health care provision

Who benefits? Evidence for what and for whom?

Legal and ethical constraints

Web 2.0


Vive la diff rence

Using the internet to find and share health information is not a linear process. Different ways of using the internet need to be understood in terms of different types of users and also in relation to different temporal and social trajectories. Health, well-being, ageing, changing jobs, moving house all affect how people, individually and collectively, use the internet.

Vive la différence!


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