BETTER CONNECTIONS   BETTER OUTCOMES

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Origins of the workshops . DEEWR undertakes a range of research and analysis of labour supply and skill shortagesDEEWR, with other Government agencies, is looking at how to address Australia's labour supply and skill shortagesRun a series of workshops to share information and ideas. Objective of

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1. BETTER CONNECTIONS – BETTER OUTCOMES IMPROVING LABOUR MARKET EFFECTIVENESS Eureka Employment Service Area 17 April 2008 STATE OFFICE TO UPDATE IF NECESSARY Welcome to Country We acknowledge and respect the traditional custodians whose ancestral lands we are meeting upon here today. We acknowledge the deep feelings of attachment and relationship of Aboriginal peoples to country. We also pay respects to the cultural authority of Aboriginal people visiting/attending from other areas of Victoria and Australia present here. It is good to see representatives here today from a wide range of organisations – not only Australian Government funded but also a range of other service providers, local business, the local chamber, and also State government representatives. The Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations runs in excess of 30 Better Connections Workshops around Australia each year. These workshops provide us with a good opportunity to discuss the local labour market. We look forward to hearing your views on issues affecting the local area and to look at ways to work collectively towards addressing these issues. The presentation and the outcomes of today’s meeting will be placed on the Australian Government’s Workplace portal on the internet (www.workplace.gov.au/bcw). STATE OFFICE TO UPDATE IF NECESSARY Welcome to Country We acknowledge and respect the traditional custodians whose ancestral lands we are meeting upon here today. We acknowledge the deep feelings of attachment and relationship of Aboriginal peoples to country. We also pay respects to the cultural authority of Aboriginal people visiting/attending from other areas of Victoria and Australia present here. It is good to see representatives here today from a wide range of organisations – not only Australian Government funded but also a range of other service providers, local business, the local chamber, and also State government representatives. The Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations runs in excess of 30 Better Connections Workshops around Australia each year. These workshops provide us with a good opportunity to discuss the local labour market. We look forward to hearing your views on issues affecting the local area and to look at ways to work collectively towards addressing these issues. The presentation and the outcomes of today’s meeting will be placed on the Australian Government’s Workplace portal on the internet (www.workplace.gov.au/bcw).

2. Origins of the workshops DEEWR undertakes a range of research and analysis of labour supply and skill shortages DEEWR, with other Government agencies, is looking at how to address Australia’s labour supply and skill shortages Run a series of workshops to share information and ideas STATE OFFICE Origins: The Department undertakes a range of research and analysis in relation to the labour market. The workshops provide an opportunity to share some of this information with people who can make things happen on the ground and use it in a practical way. Almost every day you open up a newspaper you see an article about skill shortages in a particular industry. The Department undertakes a lot of work in relation to skill shortages, education and training and is well placed to examine the issue in a holistic way (particularly in relation to vocational education and training). The Department also works with a range of other agencies including the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (in relation to its skilled migration programme) and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development, State Government and Local Government and organisations. Running a series of workshops in specific locations was identified as one way in which we could share some of this work and use it as a basis for identifying issues, opportunities and linkages relevant to a local region. And in many cases tap into some of the work that is already underway in the local area. STATE OFFICE Origins: The Department undertakes a range of research and analysis in relation to the labour market. The workshops provide an opportunity to share some of this information with people who can make things happen on the ground and use it in a practical way. Almost every day you open up a newspaper you see an article about skill shortages in a particular industry. The Department undertakes a lot of work in relation to skill shortages, education and training and is well placed to examine the issue in a holistic way (particularly in relation to vocational education and training). The Department also works with a range of other agencies including the Department of Immigration and Citizenship (in relation to its skilled migration programme) and the Department of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development, State Government and Local Government and organisations. Running a series of workshops in specific locations was identified as one way in which we could share some of this work and use it as a basis for identifying issues, opportunities and linkages relevant to a local region. And in many cases tap into some of the work that is already underway in the local area.

3. Objective of the workshops Improve Labour Market Effectiveness by addressing labour supply and skill shortage issues increasing labour market participation (target groups – mature aged, parents, people with a disability, Indigenous Australians, long-term unemployed, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, youth) establishing and further developing linkages between relevant organisations STATE OFFICE The object of the workshops is to: develop local strategies to address local labour supply and skill shortage issues, increase labour market participation for the target groups – mature aged, parents, people with a disability, Indigenous Australians, long-term unemployed, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and youth establish and further develop linkages between relevant organisations. STATE OFFICE The object of the workshops is to: develop local strategies to address local labour supply and skill shortage issues, increase labour market participation for the target groups – mature aged, parents, people with a disability, Indigenous Australians, long-term unemployed, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and youth establish and further develop linkages between relevant organisations.

4. Agenda Welcome and Introductions Better Connections presentation Overview – Regions at Work Guest Speakers Craig Jackson Jill Coote Narelle Hibberd/Wilbert Mapombere Identification and discussion of issues Developing an action plan Drawing it together Closing Remarks VIC STATE OFFICE Welcome and Introductions – There is a lot to cover today including providing available information on labour market assistance and services. Better Connections presentation – Ivan Neville, Assistant Secretary, Labour Supply and Skills Branch, will provide the workshop presentation which includes a range of local demographic and labour market information to give a good profile of the region and form the basis for discussion. Overview – Regions at Work – Guest Speakers- Craig Jackson from Bakers Delight, Jill Coote from University of Ballarat and Narelle Hibberd and Wilbert Mapombere from African Beat Employment Program will talk about employment issues and other initiatives that are currently taking place in the region. Identification and discussion of issues – we will be looking for ideas and opportunities to better connect labour demand and supply in your local area. Development of an action plan – this section of the workshop will focus on labour market issues that can be realistically addressed at the local level by utilising existing resources and programmes. Drawing it together – collectively we would like to come away today with some clear actions and an idea of who is doing what and when. I’m sure many of you have attended workshops in the past where there have been lots of ideas and discussion of issues but not much happens after the event – we hope to avoid that. It is also worth mentioning that we see DEEWR’s role as that of information sharing and facilitation. In some cases we may be required to act as a catalyst for some initiatives – but the aim is for responsibility and ownership of an action plan to be taken at the local level. Thank you. I would now like to introduce Ivan Neville to give the workshop presentation. VIC STATE OFFICE Welcome and Introductions – There is a lot to cover today including providing available information on labour market assistance and services. Better Connections presentation – Ivan Neville, Assistant Secretary, Labour Supply and Skills Branch, will provide the workshop presentation which includes a range of local demographic and labour market information to give a good profile of the region and form the basis for discussion. Overview – Regions at Work – Guest Speakers- Craig Jackson from Bakers Delight, Jill Coote from University of Ballarat and Narelle Hibberd and Wilbert Mapombere from African Beat Employment Program will talk about employment issues and other initiatives that are currently taking place in the region. Identification and discussion of issues – we will be looking for ideas and opportunities to better connect labour demand and supply in your local area. Development of an action plan – this section of the workshop will focus on labour market issues that can be realistically addressed at the local level by utilising existing resources and programmes. Drawing it together – collectively we would like to come away today with some clear actions and an idea of who is doing what and when. I’m sure many of you have attended workshops in the past where there have been lots of ideas and discussion of issues but not much happens after the event – we hope to avoid that. It is also worth mentioning that we see DEEWR’s role as that of information sharing and facilitation. In some cases we may be required to act as a catalyst for some initiatives – but the aim is for responsibility and ownership of an action plan to be taken at the local level. Thank you. I would now like to introduce Ivan Neville to give the workshop presentation.

5. Eureka Employment Service Area This is a map of the Eureka Employment Service Area (ESA), which is the region that we will be looking at today. Previous Better Connections Workshop was held in Ballarat in June 2006. Since then, the 2006 Census data have been released and we have conducted another employer survey. Today, I would like to provide you with data and more up to date labour market information on the region; An overview of the recent survey findings, and Indicate how things have changed since the last workshop. This is a map of the Eureka Employment Service Area (ESA), which is the region that we will be looking at today. Previous Better Connections Workshop was held in Ballarat in June 2006. Since then, the 2006 Census data have been released and we have conducted another employer survey. Today, I would like to provide you with data and more up to date labour market information on the region; An overview of the recent survey findings, and Indicate how things have changed since the last workshop.

6. Eureka – Demographic Profile Working Age Population (15-64) : 89 700 The adult population in Eureka is older than in Victoria Unemployment rate : 7.6% Unemployment declined in last 12 months, but remains above that of Victoria and Australia. 24% of Working Age Population receiving Centrelink payment compared with 16% for the State A smaller proportion of persons born overseas, however, there are a large number of projected Humanitarian Entrant settlements This is a broad profile of the Eureka region. Working Age Population (15-64) (Source: Population Estimates June 2006; 2001 and 2006 Census) At June 2006, the working age population (persons aged between 15 and 64 years) in the Eureka region was 89 700. This working age population accounts for 81 per cent of the Eureka adult population (15+). The adult population has an older profile compared with Victoria. There is a smaller proportion of persons aged between 25 and 44 (32 per cent in Eureka compared with 43 per cent in Victoria), and a larger proportion of persons aged 45 and over (51 per cent compared with 47 per cent). Some areas within the ESA have older populations, such as Central Goldfields (S) – Maryborough, Central Goldfields (S) – Bal, Pyrenees (S) – North and Pyrenees (S) – South, in which more than 60 per cent of the adult population are aged 45 and over. Eureka experienced significantly lower population growth between the 2001 Census and 2006 Census (3 per cent across all ages) compared with growth in Victoria (7 per cent) and in Australia (6 per cent). The number of persons aged between 25 and 44 actually decreased over this period (-3.7 per cent). Unemployment (Source: DEEWR Small Area Labour Markets, December 2007) Over the 12 months to December 2007, the unemployment rate for the Eureka region averaged 7.6 per cent, down from 8.7 per cent for the 12 months to December 2002. Despite this decline, the region’s unemployment rate remains significantly higher than that of the State or Australia overall (4.7 per cent and 4.4 per cent, respectively). The level of unemployment varies somewhat across the Eureka region, with the Central Goldfields (S) - Maryborough area recording an average unemployment rate of 8.9 per cent for the 12 months to December 2007, while the Ballarat (C) - North area recorded the lowest average rate of 3.4 per cent over the same period. At the time of the 2006 Census, the participation rate within the Eureka ESA was 60.5 per cent (compared with 64.4 per cent for Victoria and 64.6 per cent for Australia). Centrelink population Due to the high unemployment rate and the older population in the area, the proportion of the working age population in receipt of a Centrelink payment in the Eureka area is significantly higher than the proportion for Victoria overall. As at December 2007, around 24 per cent of the Eureka working age population were in receipt of a Centrelink payment compared with 16 per cent for Victoria. Diversity and Humanitarian Entrants (Source: 2006 Census of Population and Housing) A much smaller proportion of the population in the Eureka region were born overseas in comparison with the State. Persons born overseas were predominantly from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, however the area also has sizeable New Zealander and German communities. ------------------------ * DIAC DATA ARE DERIVED FROM THE DIAC SETTLEMENT REPORTS DATABASE AND IS BASED ON LGAs WHICH PREDOMINANTLY FALL WITHIN THE EUREKA ESA – Ballarat (C); Central Goldfields (S); Golden Plains (S); Hepburn (S); Moorabool (S); Pyrenees (S). Top 10 Countries of Birth United_Kingdom 4446 Netherlands 948 New_Zealand 780 Germany 645 India 340 China_ex_SARs_Taiwan_Prov 274 United_States_of_America 267 Italy 266 Philippines 211 Croatia 210 South_Africa 166 ** The quoted participation and employment rates exclude persons who labour force status is ‘Not stated’. This is a broad profile of the Eureka region. Working Age Population (15-64) (Source: Population Estimates June 2006; 2001 and 2006 Census) At June 2006, the working age population (persons aged between 15 and 64 years) in the Eureka region was 89 700. This working age population accounts for 81 per cent of the Eureka adult population (15+). The adult population has an older profile compared with Victoria. There is a smaller proportion of persons aged between 25 and 44 (32 per cent in Eureka compared with 43 per cent in Victoria), and a larger proportion of persons aged 45 and over (51 per cent compared with 47 per cent). Some areas within the ESA have older populations, such as Central Goldfields (S) – Maryborough, Central Goldfields (S) – Bal, Pyrenees (S) – North and Pyrenees (S) – South, in which more than 60 per cent of the adult population are aged 45 and over. Eureka experienced significantly lower population growth between the 2001 Census and 2006 Census (3 per cent across all ages) compared with growth in Victoria (7 per cent) and in Australia (6 per cent). The number of persons aged between 25 and 44 actually decreased over this period (-3.7 per cent). Unemployment (Source: DEEWR Small Area Labour Markets, December 2007) Over the 12 months to December 2007, the unemployment rate for the Eureka region averaged 7.6 per cent, down from 8.7 per cent for the 12 months to December 2002. Despite this decline, the region’s unemployment rate remains significantly higher than that of the State or Australia overall (4.7 per cent and 4.4 per cent, respectively). The level of unemployment varies somewhat across the Eureka region, with the Central Goldfields (S) - Maryborough area recording an average unemployment rate of 8.9 per cent for the 12 months to December 2007, while the Ballarat (C) - North area recorded the lowest average rate of 3.4 per cent over the same period. At the time of the 2006 Census, the participation rate within the Eureka ESA was 60.5 per cent (compared with 64.4 per cent for Victoria and 64.6 per cent for Australia). Centrelink population Due to the high unemployment rate and the older population in the area, the proportion of the working age population in receipt of a Centrelink payment in the Eureka area is significantly higher than the proportion for Victoria overall. As at December 2007, around 24 per cent of the Eureka working age population were in receipt of a Centrelink payment compared with 16 per cent for Victoria. Diversity and Humanitarian Entrants (Source: 2006 Census of Population and Housing) A much smaller proportion of the population in the Eureka region were born overseas in comparison with the State. Persons born overseas were predominantly from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, however the area also has sizeable New Zealander and German communities. ------------------------ * DIAC DATA ARE DERIVED FROM THE DIAC SETTLEMENT REPORTS DATABASE AND IS BASED ON LGAs WHICH PREDOMINANTLY FALL WITHIN THE EUREKA ESA – Ballarat (C); Central Goldfields (S); Golden Plains (S); Hepburn (S); Moorabool (S); Pyrenees (S). Top 10 Countries of Birth United_Kingdom 4446 Netherlands 948 New_Zealand 780 Germany 645 India 340 China_ex_SARs_Taiwan_Prov 274 United_States_of_America 267 Italy 266 Philippines 211 Croatia 210 South_Africa 166 ** The quoted participation and employment rates exclude persons who labour force status is ‘Not stated’.

7. Eureka – Industry Profile Another important component of the profile of the Eureka area is the distribution of employment across industries. (Source unless stated: 2006 Census of Population and Housing) The Retail Trade industry was the largest employing industry in Eureka and accounted for 16.3 per cent of employment at the time of the 2006 Census. Other major employing industries were Manufacturing (13.9 per cent of total employment); Health and Community Services (13.5 per cent of total employment); and Education (9.0 per cent of total employment). The proportion of employment in each of the Retail Trade, Manufacturing, Health and Community Services and Education industries is higher than for Victoria overall. Other service-based industries, particularly Property and Business Services, account for a lower proportion of employment in the Eureka area compared with the State. We can gain some insight into how this industry composition has changed by analysing the industry growth that has occurred since the 2001 Census (Source: 2001 and 2006 Census). According to these figures, employment in the Eureka area has grown by around 12.9 per cent between August 2001 and August 2006 (compared with 10.0 per cent nationally). This employment growth was particularly strong in the Government Administration and Defence (up by 70.0 per cent, representing 4.6 per cent of total employment at the time of the 2006 Census) and Construction industries (up by 38.4 per cent, representing 7.9 per cent of total employment). Growth in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing industry has declined by 13.4 per cent, largely due to the effects of drought. The Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing industry is also one of the most likely to be affected by an ageing workforce. At the time of the 2006 Census, 62 per cent of the workforce in this industry was aged 45 years and over. The Transport and Storage industry is also likely to be affected with 55 per cent of its workforce aged 45+.Another important component of the profile of the Eureka area is the distribution of employment across industries. (Source unless stated: 2006 Census of Population and Housing) The Retail Trade industry was the largest employing industry in Eureka and accounted for 16.3 per cent of employment at the time of the 2006 Census. Other major employing industries were Manufacturing (13.9 per cent of total employment); Health and Community Services (13.5 per cent of total employment); and Education (9.0 per cent of total employment). The proportion of employment in each of the Retail Trade, Manufacturing, Health and Community Services and Education industries is higher than for Victoria overall. Other service-based industries, particularly Property and Business Services, account for a lower proportion of employment in the Eureka area compared with the State. We can gain some insight into how this industry composition has changed by analysing the industry growth that has occurred since the 2001 Census (Source: 2001 and 2006 Census). According to these figures, employment in the Eureka area has grown by around 12.9 per cent between August 2001 and August 2006 (compared with 10.0 per cent nationally). This employment growth was particularly strong in the Government Administration and Defence (up by 70.0 per cent, representing 4.6 per cent of total employment at the time of the 2006 Census) and Construction industries (up by 38.4 per cent, representing 7.9 per cent of total employment). Growth in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing industry has declined by 13.4 per cent, largely due to the effects of drought. The Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing industry is also one of the most likely to be affected by an ageing workforce. At the time of the 2006 Census, 62 per cent of the workforce in this industry was aged 45 years and over. The Transport and Storage industry is also likely to be affected with 55 per cent of its workforce aged 45+.

8. Eureka – Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences Next we look at the recruitment experiences of employers in the Eureka area. To gain a greater understanding of the skills in demand in the area, DEEWR conducted a telephone survey of local employers in January 2008. Findings from the survey provide a good indication of the nature of recruitment activity and the extent to which local employers face recruitment difficulties, as well as identifying labour market opportunities into which employment service providers can tap. The Eureka Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences collected information from 259 businesses.* These responses were concentrated in 6 key industries: Retail Trade (40 responses), Health and Community Services (39), Property and Business Services (30), Accommodation Cafés and Restaurants (24), Manufacturing (22) and Construction (22). Overall the survey found that: 53 per cent of employers surveyed had recruited or attempted to recruit in the past 12 months. This was highest in the Health and Community Services industry (77 per cent), which, as previously discussed, has experienced strong employment growth. Recruitment was lowest in the Construction industry (27 per cent). By comparison, in all regions surveyed in the 10 months to January 2008, 58 per cent of Construction industry employers had recruited in the previous 12 months. However, it is possible that there is now a stable workforce in the Construction industry as it experienced growth in the previous year. In all, Eureka employers reported that they had attempted to fill 784 vacancies and, of these, 13 per cent (104) were not filled, compared with an unfill rate of 9.3 per cent for all regions surveyed in the 10 months to January 2008. At the time of the 2006 BCW the unfill rate was 9.3 per cent, indicating that recruitment may have become more difficult for employers and there are greater opportunities for job seekers in the region. The proportion of vacancies unfilled was particularly high in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing and Transport and Storage industries (33 per cent and 26 per cent of vacancies, respectively), while none of the vacancies reported by employers in the Wholesale Trade industry remained unfilled. These unfilled vacancies were distributed across 20 per cent of employers who had attempted to recruit. Finally, of the employers who had attempted to recruit, 68 per cent reported difficulty filling vacancies. This proportion was highest in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing and Transport and Storage industries, in which 100 per cent of employers experienced difficulty, which is consistent with the high percentage of vacancies which remained unfilled. --------------------------- * NOTE: A further 26 sole traders were surveyed, however, the results for these businesses have been excluded.Next we look at the recruitment experiences of employers in the Eureka area. To gain a greater understanding of the skills in demand in the area, DEEWR conducted a telephone survey of local employers in January 2008. Findings from the survey provide a good indication of the nature of recruitment activity and the extent to which local employers face recruitment difficulties, as well as identifying labour market opportunities into which employment service providers can tap. The Eureka Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences collected information from 259 businesses.* These responses were concentrated in 6 key industries: Retail Trade (40 responses), Health and Community Services (39), Property and Business Services (30), Accommodation Cafés and Restaurants (24), Manufacturing (22) and Construction (22). Overall the survey found that: 53 per cent of employers surveyed had recruited or attempted to recruit in the past 12 months. This was highest in the Health and Community Services industry (77 per cent), which, as previously discussed, has experienced strong employment growth. Recruitment was lowest in the Construction industry (27 per cent). By comparison, in all regions surveyed in the 10 months to January 2008, 58 per cent of Construction industry employers had recruited in the previous 12 months. However, it is possible that there is now a stable workforce in the Construction industry as it experienced growth in the previous year. In all, Eureka employers reported that they had attempted to fill 784 vacancies and, of these, 13 per cent (104) were not filled, compared with an unfill rate of 9.3 per cent for all regions surveyed in the 10 months to January 2008. At the time of the 2006 BCW the unfill rate was 9.3 per cent, indicating that recruitment may have become more difficult for employers and there are greater opportunities for job seekers in the region. The proportion of vacancies unfilled was particularly high in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing and Transport and Storage industries (33 per cent and 26 per cent of vacancies, respectively), while none of the vacancies reported by employers in the Wholesale Trade industry remained unfilled. These unfilled vacancies were distributed across 20 per cent of employers who had attempted to recruit. Finally, of the employers who had attempted to recruit, 68 per cent reported difficulty filling vacancies. This proportion was highest in the Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing and Transport and Storage industries, in which 100 per cent of employers experienced difficulty, which is consistent with the high percentage of vacancies which remained unfilled. --------------------------- * NOTE: A further 26 sole traders were surveyed, however, the results for these businesses have been excluded.

9. Eureka – Success filling recent vacancies The recruitment difficulties experienced by employers can be attributed to a number of causes. While many of these reasons relate to aspects of the employer, industry or region, such as location or availability of local labour supply, other causes of difficulty can stem from the type of occupation that an employer is attempting to fill. One of the key indicators to measure the recruitment difficulties for a particular occupation is the degree of success that employers had in filling vacancies with suitable job seekers. Employers were asked to provide information on their most recent vacancy. This chart shows the number of most recent vacancies that were reported by employers in the Eureka area. These are broken down by skill level and whether the employer filled the vacancy with suitable staff (blue section), filled the vacancy with staff with whom they were unhappy or who required development (yellow section), and whether the vacancy was not filled (red section). The largest number of most recent vacancies were in higher skilled occupations, such as Registered Nurses, Veterinarians and Teachers (97 vacancies for higher skilled occupations in total). Of these vacancies, 15 (or 16 per cent) were not filled and a further 6 vacancies were filled with a job seeker who required development by the employer (6 per cent). A similar proportion of vacancies for medium skilled occupations (87 vacancies in total), such as Receptionists, Administration Clerks and Travel Consultants, remained unfilled (16 per cent). Overall, across all skill levels, 34 (or 14 per cent) of these most recent vacancies were not filled, with a further 13 vacancies filled with job seekers who required development. The main reason employers reported as to why job seekers required development was that they were hired as an apprentice or trainee (31 per cent of employers with job seekers requiring development). Although development is anticipated when hiring apprentices and trainees, these employers reported these reasons because they were seeking to fill their vacancies with more highly qualified job seekers (either a fully qualified tradesperson or a higher year apprentice). Outside of apprenticeships, the main reason that job seekers needed development was due to a lack of experience (23 per cent) --------------------------- Skill levels Highly skilled includes: Managers and Administrators; Professionals; Associate Professionals; and Tradespersons and Related Workers. Medium skilled includes: Advanced Clerical and Service Workers; Intermediate Clerical, Sales and Service Workers; and Intermediate Production and Transport Workers. Lower skilled includes: Elementary Clerical, Sales and Service Workers; and Labourers and Related Workers. The recruitment difficulties experienced by employers can be attributed to a number of causes. While many of these reasons relate to aspects of the employer, industry or region, such as location or availability of local labour supply, other causes of difficulty can stem from the type of occupation that an employer is attempting to fill. One of the key indicators to measure the recruitment difficulties for a particular occupation is the degree of success that employers had in filling vacancies with suitable job seekers. Employers were asked to provide information on their most recent vacancy. This chart shows the number of most recent vacancies that were reported by employers in the Eureka area. These are broken down by skill level and whether the employer filled the vacancy with suitable staff (blue section), filled the vacancy with staff with whom they were unhappy or who required development (yellow section), and whether the vacancy was not filled (red section). The largest number of most recent vacancies were in higher skilled occupations, such as Registered Nurses, Veterinarians and Teachers (97 vacancies for higher skilled occupations in total). Of these vacancies, 15 (or 16 per cent) were not filled and a further 6 vacancies were filled with a job seeker who required development by the employer (6 per cent). A similar proportion of vacancies for medium skilled occupations (87 vacancies in total), such as Receptionists, Administration Clerks and Travel Consultants, remained unfilled (16 per cent). Overall, across all skill levels, 34 (or 14 per cent) of these most recent vacancies were not filled, with a further 13 vacancies filled with job seekers who required development. The main reason employers reported as to why job seekers required development was that they were hired as an apprentice or trainee (31 per cent of employers with job seekers requiring development). Although development is anticipated when hiring apprentices and trainees, these employers reported these reasons because they were seeking to fill their vacancies with more highly qualified job seekers (either a fully qualified tradesperson or a higher year apprentice). Outside of apprenticeships, the main reason that job seekers needed development was due to a lack of experience (23 per cent) --------------------------- Skill levels Highly skilled includes: Managers and Administrators; Professionals; Associate Professionals; and Tradespersons and Related Workers. Medium skilled includes: Advanced Clerical and Service Workers; Intermediate Clerical, Sales and Service Workers; and Intermediate Production and Transport Workers. Lower skilled includes: Elementary Clerical, Sales and Service Workers; and Labourers and Related Workers.

10. Eureka – Competition for recent vacancies The second indicator of recruitment difficulties is the level of competition for vacancies and the quality of applicants. This chart shows the average number of people who applied for vacancies (most recent only) and the average number of applicants who were considered suitable for the job for which they had applied. Overall, the results of the survey indicate that the level of competition for vacancies in the Eureka area is higher than in other regions surveyed with an average of 7.0 applicants per vacancy (compared with an average of 4.0 applicants for all surveys conducted in the ten months to January 2008), however, employers still reported difficulty in recruiting staff and there was a significantly higher proportion of unfilled vacancies, as discussed on previous slides. In 2006 employers reported there was an average of 5.3 applicants per vacancy, indicating that competition between job seekers has increased in the region. There was the least competition for higher skilled vacancies, with an average of 4.1 applicants per vacancy. Conversely, medium skilled vacancies attracted an average of 9.6 applicants per vacancy, and lower skilled occupations attracted an average of 7.8 job seekers. The larger number of applicants for medium and lower skilled vacancies can be partly attributed to a number of surveyed employers who reported 50 or more applicants for medium and lower skilled occupations, such as Clerks, bar attendants, process workers and sales assistants. Competition for vacancies alone does not explain how applicants contribute to recruitment difficulties. The quality of applicants can affect not only whether an employer fills a vacancy but also whether they are satisfied with the outcome of recruitment. As shown in the chart, in the Eureka area, just over one quarter of applicants (average of 2.2) were considered suitable for the job for which they had applied. Although this is higher than for all surveys conducted in the ten months to January 2008 (1.7 suitable applicants per vacancy), and what employers reported two years ago (0.9 suitable applicants per vacancy), the proportion of applicants rated suitable is significantly smaller. The second indicator of recruitment difficulties is the level of competition for vacancies and the quality of applicants. This chart shows the average number of people who applied for vacancies (most recent only) and the average number of applicants who were considered suitable for the job for which they had applied. Overall, the results of the survey indicate that the level of competition for vacancies in the Eureka area is higher than in other regions surveyed with an average of 7.0 applicants per vacancy (compared with an average of 4.0 applicants for all surveys conducted in the ten months to January 2008), however, employers still reported difficulty in recruiting staff and there was a significantly higher proportion of unfilled vacancies, as discussed on previous slides. In 2006 employers reported there was an average of 5.3 applicants per vacancy, indicating that competition between job seekers has increased in the region. There was the least competition for higher skilled vacancies, with an average of 4.1 applicants per vacancy. Conversely, medium skilled vacancies attracted an average of 9.6 applicants per vacancy, and lower skilled occupations attracted an average of 7.8 job seekers. The larger number of applicants for medium and lower skilled vacancies can be partly attributed to a number of surveyed employers who reported 50 or more applicants for medium and lower skilled occupations, such as Clerks, bar attendants, process workers and sales assistants. Competition for vacancies alone does not explain how applicants contribute to recruitment difficulties. The quality of applicants can affect not only whether an employer fills a vacancy but also whether they are satisfied with the outcome of recruitment. As shown in the chart, in the Eureka area, just over one quarter of applicants (average of 2.2) were considered suitable for the job for which they had applied. Although this is higher than for all surveys conducted in the ten months to January 2008 (1.7 suitable applicants per vacancy), and what employers reported two years ago (0.9 suitable applicants per vacancy), the proportion of applicants rated suitable is significantly smaller.

11. Eureka - Reasons applicants were unsuitable This chart shows why surveyed employers found one or more applicants to be unsuitable for the occupation for which they had applied, by the skill level of the occupation. Across all most recently advertised vacancies, employers most commonly found one or more applicants to be unsuitable because they had insufficient experience (65 per cent of employers). Other reasons that were commonly reported by employers included: Limited interest in the job (28 per cent); Insufficient qualifications or training (28 per cent); and Inadequate communication and/or team work skills (12 per cent). Insufficient qualifications or training to perform job duties was more widely reported by employers with higher and medium skilled vacancies. By contrast, employers with lower skilled vacancies were much more likely to report limited interest in the job. Those employers recruiting for medium skilled vacancies more commonly reported poorly written or presented applications as reasons for applicant unsuitability (22 per cent of employers with medium skilled vacancies reported this reason). -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------This chart shows why surveyed employers found one or more applicants to be unsuitable for the occupation for which they had applied, by the skill level of the occupation. Across all most recently advertised vacancies, employers most commonly found one or more applicants to be unsuitable because they had insufficient experience (65 per cent of employers). Other reasons that were commonly reported by employers included: Limited interest in the job (28 per cent); Insufficient qualifications or training (28 per cent); and Inadequate communication and/or team work skills (12 per cent). Insufficient qualifications or training to perform job duties was more widely reported by employers with higher and medium skilled vacancies. By contrast, employers with lower skilled vacancies were much more likely to report limited interest in the job. Those employers recruiting for medium skilled vacancies more commonly reported poorly written or presented applications as reasons for applicant unsuitability (22 per cent of employers with medium skilled vacancies reported this reason). -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

12. Eureka – Difficult to fill occupations All of the factors discussed so far can contribute to recruitment difficulties and are indicative of skills in demand in the Eureka region. In the Eureka area, 60 per cent of employers reported that their most recent occupation was difficult to fill. Major reasons for recruitment difficulty include: the technical skill requirements of the job (50 per cent) the tight labour market, that is, not enough applicants (42 per cent) (however, this is lower than for all regions surveyed in the 10 months to January 2008 (54 per cent)) the nature of the work required (16 per cent), and the location of the job or employer (16 per cent) (This was reported by 29 per cent of employers with higher skilled vacancies). What we can see on this slide is an indicative list of the occupations that were most commonly reported as difficult to fill by employers (all vacancies over the last 12 months)1. While this list of occupations does not directly translate to a comprehensive list of occupations in demand for the region, it does provide valuable information on jobs that are difficult to fill and identifies opportunities for job seekers with the appropriate skills and qualifications or the ability to quickly gain these skills. As is evident from the list, recruitment difficulties exist across the range of skill levels and include occupations such as: Higher skilled occupations: Veterinarians Welfare and Community Workers Counsellors Metal Fitters and Machinists Welders and Fabricators Carpenters, Joiners and Cabinetmakers Plumbers Shearers Cabinetmakers Medium and lower skilled occupations: Receptionists General Clerks Children’s Care Workers Travel and Tourism Agents Truck Drivers Bus drivers Sales Assistants Cleaners Farm Hands Some of these occupations could present entry level opportunities for humanitarian entrants and other job seekers in the region. ------------------------------------------------ Information on recruitment difficulties and skills in demand is difficult to obtain. The Department monitors and undertakes research on skills in demand and prepares listings of these occupations at the State and national level. The prime focus of DEEWR’s approach is surveying employers who have recently advertised vacancies for selected skilled occupations, although contact is also made with industry bodies and employer organisations. This information is published on the Department's Workplace site (www.workplace.gov.au/skillsindemand). 1Greatest difficulty has been determined by multiple employers in the region reporting recruitment difficulty for that occupation and does not necessarily translate into unfilled vacancies in that occupation. All of the factors discussed so far can contribute to recruitment difficulties and are indicative of skills in demand in the Eureka region. In the Eureka area, 60 per cent of employers reported that their most recent occupation was difficult to fill. Major reasons for recruitment difficulty include: the technical skill requirements of the job (50 per cent) the tight labour market, that is, not enough applicants (42 per cent) (however, this is lower than for all regions surveyed in the 10 months to January 2008 (54 per cent)) the nature of the work required (16 per cent), and the location of the job or employer (16 per cent) (This was reported by 29 per cent of employers with higher skilled vacancies). What we can see on this slide is an indicative list of the occupations that were most commonly reported as difficult to fill by employers (all vacancies over the last 12 months)1. While this list of occupations does not directly translate to a comprehensive list of occupations in demand for the region, it does provide valuable information on jobs that are difficult to fill and identifies opportunities for job seekers with the appropriate skills and qualifications or the ability to quickly gain these skills. As is evident from the list, recruitment difficulties exist across the range of skill levels and include occupations such as: Higher skilled occupations: Veterinarians Welfare and Community Workers Counsellors Metal Fitters and Machinists Welders and Fabricators Carpenters, Joiners and Cabinetmakers Plumbers Shearers Cabinetmakers Medium and lower skilled occupations: Receptionists General Clerks Children’s Care Workers Travel and Tourism Agents Truck Drivers Bus drivers Sales Assistants Cleaners Farm Hands Some of these occupations could present entry level opportunities for humanitarian entrants and other job seekers in the region. ------------------------------------------------ Information on recruitment difficulties and skills in demand is difficult to obtain. The Department monitors and undertakes research on skills in demand and prepares listings of these occupations at the State and national level. The prime focus of DEEWR’s approach is surveying employers who have recently advertised vacancies for selected skilled occupations, although contact is also made with industry bodies and employer organisations. This information is published on the Department's Workplace site (www.workplace.gov.au/skillsindemand). 1Greatest difficulty has been determined by multiple employers in the region reporting recruitment difficulty for that occupation and does not necessarily translate into unfilled vacancies in that occupation.

13. Eureka – Recruitment Expectations I will now briefly look at how demand for labour may develop over the next 12 months and the effect of this demand on future recruitment difficulties. Less than half (43 per cent) of the employers surveyed expect to recruit over the next 12 months. In the 2006 survey 41 per cent of employers reported that they expected to recruit in the 12 months following that survey, which was significantly lower than the 52 per cent of employers who did recruit in the 12 months preceding the 2008 survey. In contrast to the last 12 months, these recruitment expectations are particularly high in the Construction industry (64 per cent of employers expect to recruit in the next 12 months, compared with 27 per cent of employers who did recruit in the previous 12 months). However, in other industries a downturn in recruitment activity is expected, such as in the Health and Community Services Industry, which expects to almost halve its recruitment activities. A large proportion of this recruitment is anticipated to stem from employment growth with 65 per cent of the employers who expect to recruit anticipating the need to create positions within their business over the next 12 months (compared with 56 per cent of all employers surveyed in the 10 months to January 2008. These employment growth expectations are highest in the Manufacturing and Property and Business Services industries (reported by 86 per cent of employers in each industry). Any employment growth in the area is likely to place further pressure on employers to retain staff. In relation to retention, 57 per cent of employers who expect to recruit in the next 12 months anticipate needing to recruit to replace staff in their business in the next 12 months. In particular, 80 per cent of employers in the Accommodation, Cafés and Restaurants industry expect to recruit in the next 12 months because of staff turnover. The growing demand for labour may also lead to recruitment difficulties both in attracting and retaining staff. This expectation of recruitment difficulties is held by 47 per cent of employers who expect to recruit in the next 12 months. In the face of increasing demand and recruitment difficulties, employers will need to look for strategies to develop job seekers to meet their business needs. The survey found that 51 per cent of employers who expect to recruit would employ an apprentice or trainee over the next 12 months. 64 per cent of employers in the Construction industry reported they are prepared to recruit an apprentice or trainee in the next 12 months. ----------------------------------------------------I will now briefly look at how demand for labour may develop over the next 12 months and the effect of this demand on future recruitment difficulties. Less than half (43 per cent) of the employers surveyed expect to recruit over the next 12 months. In the 2006 survey 41 per cent of employers reported that they expected to recruit in the 12 months following that survey, which was significantly lower than the 52 per cent of employers who did recruit in the 12 months preceding the 2008 survey. In contrast to the last 12 months, these recruitment expectations are particularly high in the Construction industry (64 per cent of employers expect to recruit in the next 12 months, compared with 27 per cent of employers who did recruit in the previous 12 months). However, in other industries a downturn in recruitment activity is expected, such as in the Health and Community Services Industry, which expects to almost halve its recruitment activities. A large proportion of this recruitment is anticipated to stem from employment growth with 65 per cent of the employers who expect to recruit anticipating the need to create positions within their business over the next 12 months (compared with 56 per cent of all employers surveyed in the 10 months to January 2008. These employment growth expectations are highest in the Manufacturing and Property and Business Services industries (reported by 86 per cent of employers in each industry). Any employment growth in the area is likely to place further pressure on employers to retain staff. In relation to retention, 57 per cent of employers who expect to recruit in the next 12 months anticipate needing to recruit to replace staff in their business in the next 12 months. In particular, 80 per cent of employers in the Accommodation, Cafés and Restaurants industry expect to recruit in the next 12 months because of staff turnover. The growing demand for labour may also lead to recruitment difficulties both in attracting and retaining staff. This expectation of recruitment difficulties is held by 47 per cent of employers who expect to recruit in the next 12 months. In the face of increasing demand and recruitment difficulties, employers will need to look for strategies to develop job seekers to meet their business needs. The survey found that 51 per cent of employers who expect to recruit would employ an apprentice or trainee over the next 12 months. 64 per cent of employers in the Construction industry reported they are prepared to recruit an apprentice or trainee in the next 12 months. ----------------------------------------------------

14. Eureka – JNM and JPO activity Informal methods of recruitment (such as word of mouth and approaching a job seeker directly) remain widely used by employers in the Eureka area particularly among those with lower skilled vacancies (52 per cent). This indicates an opportunity for employment service providers to work more closely with many local businesses. Currently, much of the activity of employment service providers is focussed on lower skilled occupations, such as Labouring vacancies, which accounted for 36 per cent of all vacancies lodged with JNMs and JPOs in the 12 months to December 2007. In total across all occupations, 59 per cent of the vacancies were filled, which is higher than the national average (44 per cent). In total, there were 297 apprenticeship and traineeship placements made by JNMs or JPOs in the 12 months to December 2007 (accounting for 55 per cent the positions listed with JNMs and JPOs, which is 6 percentage points higher than in 2006). Only 30 per cent of these placements were in Trades occupations, indicating that employers in the Eureka area are likely to consider apprentices or trainees for a much wider range of occupations. The most commonly mentioned include: Concreters Plumbers Office Administration Trainees Retail Trainees Trainee Veterinary Nurses ------------------------------- We acknowledge that some vacancies may be lodged with more than one provider or the vacancy may have been filled by someone other than a Job Network Member or Job Placement Provider.Informal methods of recruitment (such as word of mouth and approaching a job seeker directly) remain widely used by employers in the Eureka area particularly among those with lower skilled vacancies (52 per cent). This indicates an opportunity for employment service providers to work more closely with many local businesses. Currently, much of the activity of employment service providers is focussed on lower skilled occupations, such as Labouring vacancies, which accounted for 36 per cent of all vacancies lodged with JNMs and JPOs in the 12 months to December 2007. In total across all occupations, 59 per cent of the vacancies were filled, which is higher than the national average (44 per cent). In total, there were 297 apprenticeship and traineeship placements made by JNMs or JPOs in the 12 months to December 2007 (accounting for 55 per cent the positions listed with JNMs and JPOs, which is 6 percentage points higher than in 2006). Only 30 per cent of these placements were in Trades occupations, indicating that employers in the Eureka area are likely to consider apprentices or trainees for a much wider range of occupations. The most commonly mentioned include: Concreters Plumbers Office Administration Trainees Retail Trainees Trainee Veterinary Nurses ------------------------------- We acknowledge that some vacancies may be lodged with more than one provider or the vacancy may have been filled by someone other than a Job Network Member or Job Placement Provider.

15. To meet the challenge posed by future employment growth and the effects of an ageing workforce, employers will need to look beyond traditional sources of labour. One such source of labour that may be available to take up opportunities created by closer Job Network engagement with businesses are those currently in receipt of a Centrelink payment. Overall, as at December 2007, there were around 21 300 persons of working age in receipt of a Centrelink payment in the Eureka ESA. This equates to around 24 per cent of the total working age population, which is higher than the proportion for Victoria and Australia overall (16 per cent and 17 per cent respectively). The number of recipients has dropped by 1400 people since March 2006 and the Job Network active caseload has fallen by a similar amount (1200). (Source: Centrelink and DEEWR administrative data, December 2007 based on 2006 population estimates). This chart shows those people whose main source of income is likely to be a Centrelink payment in the Eureka ESA. Most prominent are the high numbers of people receiving the Disability Support Pension, which accounts for 33 per cent of all recipients in the area. Other significant payment types are Newstart Allowance and Parenting Payment Single. These two payment types account for a further 17 per cent and 15 per cent of the area’s Centrelink recipients. We can also see from the chart that the engagement with Job Network is quite high for Newstart Allowance and Youth Allowance (Other) recipients. On the other hand engagement with recipients of Disability Support Pension is quite low. To meet the challenge posed by future employment growth and the effects of an ageing workforce, employers will need to look beyond traditional sources of labour. One such source of labour that may be available to take up opportunities created by closer Job Network engagement with businesses are those currently in receipt of a Centrelink payment. Overall, as at December 2007, there were around 21 300 persons of working age in receipt of a Centrelink payment in the Eureka ESA. This equates to around 24 per cent of the total working age population, which is higher than the proportion for Victoria and Australia overall (16 per cent and 17 per cent respectively). The number of recipients has dropped by 1400 people since March 2006 and the Job Network active caseload has fallen by a similar amount (1200). (Source: Centrelink and DEEWR administrative data, December 2007 based on 2006 population estimates). This chart shows those people whose main source of income is likely to be a Centrelink payment in the Eureka ESA. Most prominent are the high numbers of people receiving the Disability Support Pension, which accounts for 33 per cent of all recipients in the area. Other significant payment types are Newstart Allowance and Parenting Payment Single. These two payment types account for a further 17 per cent and 15 per cent of the area’s Centrelink recipients. We can also see from the chart that the engagement with Job Network is quite high for Newstart Allowance and Youth Allowance (Other) recipients. On the other hand engagement with recipients of Disability Support Pension is quite low.

16. What can be done? Looking beyond the traditional sources of labour: Parents, people with disabilities and mature age workers Improving Workplace Flexibility: Phased retirement Increasing education and training Increasing access to flexible working hours Job sharing Improving the work/family balance Providing childcare facilities Apprenticeships / Traineeships Recruiting lower skilled workers and training them up In the context of a shrinking workforce caused by ageing and strong employment growth, employment service providers will need to encourage the use of two key strategies to attract and retain workers: look beyond the traditional sources of labour and improve workplace flexibility. Looking beyond traditional sources of labour International comparisons of labour force participation rates indicate that it is possible to catch up with the best performing countries by increasing participation among welfare recipients, mature age workers and parents. One of the keys to attracting and retaining workers is to improve workplace flexibility. Some innovative responses that employers are already making include: Retaining mature-age employees through strategies such as phased retirement and age-awareness training; Increasing education and training for existing employees (both on and off the job); Increasing access to flexible working hours; Job sharing; Improving the work/family balance for their employees; Providing child care facilities in or near the workplace to retain workers who are carers for young children; Modifying the workplace and tasks so that they can be performed by employees with various levels of disability; Offering Apprenticeships/Traineeships; and Recruiting people at the lower skill level and training them to perform the job. In the context of a shrinking workforce caused by ageing and strong employment growth, employment service providers will need to encourage the use of two key strategies to attract and retain workers: look beyond the traditional sources of labour and improve workplace flexibility. Looking beyond traditional sources of labour International comparisons of labour force participation rates indicate that it is possible to catch up with the best performing countries by increasing participation among welfare recipients, mature age workers and parents. One of the keys to attracting and retaining workers is to improve workplace flexibility. Some innovative responses that employers are already making include: Retaining mature-age employees through strategies such as phased retirement and age-awareness training; Increasing education and training for existing employees (both on and off the job); Increasing access to flexible working hours; Job sharing; Improving the work/family balance for their employees; Providing child care facilities in or near the workplace to retain workers who are carers for young children; Modifying the workplace and tasks so that they can be performed by employees with various levels of disability; Offering Apprenticeships/Traineeships; and Recruiting people at the lower skill level and training them to perform the job.

17. Summary High unemployment in Eureka Older adult population that Victoria Low population growth between 2001 and 2006 Strong employment growth in the region 13 per cent of vacancies remained unfilled Around one quarter of applicants were considered suitable, with lack of experience the greatest barrier Employers have difficulty filling vacancies at all skill levels Opportunity for employers to engage with non-traditional sources of labour The region is experiencing higher unemployment than Australia generally The Eureka area has an unemployment rate above that of Australia generally (7.6 per cent compared with 4.4 per cent in December 2007). This varies significantly across the region with Ballarat (C) - North recording an average unemployment rate of 3.4 per cent compared with 8.9 in Central Goldfields (S) – M’borough. Older population (Source: Population Estimates June 2006) The adult population has an older profile compared with Victoria. There is a smaller proportion of persons aged between 25 and 44 (32 per cent in Eureka compared with 43 per cent in Victoria), and a larger proportion of persons aged 45 and over (51 per cent compared with 47 per cent). Population growth (Source: 2001 and 2006 Census) Between the 2001 and 2006 Census, the Eureka ESA experienced population growth of 3 per cent, significantly lower than that in Victoria and Australia overall (7 per cent and 6 per cent respectively). Notably, over this period, the population aged between 25 and 44 decreased by 4 per cent. Employment growth Despite low population growth, employment in the Eureka area increased by 12.9 per cent between the 2001 and 2006 Census. This employment growth predominantly occurred in the Health and Community Services and Construction industries (growth in these industries account for 2331 of the 6352 positions created between the 2001 and 2006 Census years (37 per cent)). Evidence from the survey suggests that businesses in the Health and Community Services, an industry responsible for providing services to an ageing population, have recruited strongly over the past 12 months (77 per cent) although this is not likely to continue over the next 12 months with just 39 per cent of surveyed businesses in that industry expecting to recruit. Unfilled vacancies In all, Eureka employers reported that they had attempted to fill 784 vacancies and, of these, 13 per cent (104) were not filled, compared with an unfill rate of 9.3 per cent for all regions surveyed in the 10 months to January 2008. At the time of the 2006 BCW the unfill rate was 9.3 per cent, indicating that recruitment may have become more difficult for employers and there are greater opportunities for job seekers in the region. Competition between applicants In the Eureka area, just over one quarter of applicants (average of 2.2) were considered suitable for the job for which they had applied. Although this is higher than for all surveys conducted in the ten months to January 2006 (1.7 suitable applicants per vacancy), and what employers reported two years ago (0.9 suitable applicants per vacancy), the proportion of applicants rated suitable is significantly smaller. The level of competition between suitable applicants could be improved by addressing issues relating to the work experience and training of some applicants. Although 65 per cent of employers reported that lack of experience was a reason for applicant unsuitability, it was not a barrier to employment in all cases, with 23 per cent of those employers who recruited staff needing development reporting a lack of experience as the reason. This indicates that Employment Service Providers could use the Job Seeker Account to provide relevant training to job seekers or to provide wage subsidies to employers who are willing to recruit job seekers who may lack experience or training. The region is experiencing higher unemployment than Australia generally The Eureka area has an unemployment rate above that of Australia generally (7.6 per cent compared with 4.4 per cent in December 2007). This varies significantly across the region with Ballarat (C) - North recording an average unemployment rate of 3.4 per cent compared with 8.9 in Central Goldfields (S) – M’borough. Older population (Source: Population Estimates June 2006) The adult population has an older profile compared with Victoria. There is a smaller proportion of persons aged between 25 and 44 (32 per cent in Eureka compared with 43 per cent in Victoria), and a larger proportion of persons aged 45 and over (51 per cent compared with 47 per cent). Population growth (Source: 2001 and 2006 Census) Between the 2001 and 2006 Census, the Eureka ESA experienced population growth of 3 per cent, significantly lower than that in Victoria and Australia overall (7 per cent and 6 per cent respectively). Notably, over this period, the population aged between 25 and 44 decreased by 4 per cent. Employment growth Despite low population growth, employment in the Eureka area increased by 12.9 per cent between the 2001 and 2006 Census. This employment growth predominantly occurred in the Health and Community Services and Construction industries (growth in these industries account for 2331 of the 6352 positions created between the 2001 and 2006 Census years (37 per cent)). Evidence from the survey suggests that businesses in the Health and Community Services, an industry responsible for providing services to an ageing population, have recruited strongly over the past 12 months (77 per cent) although this is not likely to continue over the next 12 months with just 39 per cent of surveyed businesses in that industry expecting to recruit. Unfilled vacancies In all, Eureka employers reported that they had attempted to fill 784 vacancies and, of these, 13 per cent (104) were not filled, compared with an unfill rate of 9.3 per cent for all regions surveyed in the 10 months to January 2008. At the time of the 2006 BCW the unfill rate was 9.3 per cent, indicating that recruitment may have become more difficult for employers and there are greater opportunities for job seekers in the region. Competition between applicants In the Eureka area, just over one quarter of applicants (average of 2.2) were considered suitable for the job for which they had applied. Although this is higher than for all surveys conducted in the ten months to January 2006 (1.7 suitable applicants per vacancy), and what employers reported two years ago (0.9 suitable applicants per vacancy), the proportion of applicants rated suitable is significantly smaller. The level of competition between suitable applicants could be improved by addressing issues relating to the work experience and training of some applicants. Although 65 per cent of employers reported that lack of experience was a reason for applicant unsuitability, it was not a barrier to employment in all cases, with 23 per cent of those employers who recruited staff needing development reporting a lack of experience as the reason. This indicates that Employment Service Providers could use the Job Seeker Account to provide relevant training to job seekers or to provide wage subsidies to employers who are willing to recruit job seekers who may lack experience or training.

18. Productivity Places Program to deliver 450 000 training places over four years 175 000 of the places will be for job seekers Focus on priority occupations – those in demand and difficult to recruit for Registered training organisations will work with employment service providers to identify eligible job seekers Activity test changes will be made to reflect the priority given to training The Productivity Places Program under the Skilling Australia for the Future initiative will deliver 450,000 training places over four years in priority occupations, to help Australian workers develop the skills they need. 175,000 training places are allocated to job seekers, including 20,000 apprenticeship places. Training places for job seekers have been available since April 2008. Priority occupations are occupations assessed as being in demand and occupations for which employers have experienced recruitment difficulty. Changes to the list of priority occupations will be made by Skills Australia – a high level body of experts, comprising economic, industry, academic and expertise in the provision of education or training – established to advise the Government on current and future demand for skills and training. It will identify future and persistent skills shortages as well as industries where retraining and up-skilling of workers may be required to prevent unemployment, under-employment and skills obsolescence. Flexible options for training will be available such as part-time, outside business hours and distance mode training. Innovative strategies may be used to deliver training in regional and remote locations. Training places will be delivered in an industry-driven system, ensuring that training is more responsive to the needs of businesses and participants. Employers can work with their local employment service providers and training organisations to meet their skills demands in priority occupations. Employment service providers will be encouraged to identify job seekers who are eligible for the fully funded training places and encourage them to undertake the training on offer. For Job Network and Disability Employment Network, time spent by a job seeker in approved Skilling Australia training will not count as time in assistance for star rating purposes. This will ensure that time spent in training will be excluded when calculating the speed of placement for star rating purposes. This is of course additional to the benefits of increased employability of job seekers as a result of quality training. The policy on activity test requirements will be improved to enable job seekers to undertake training. To ensure a job seeker is able to complete their training, the job seekers (whether in part-time or full-time training) will only be required to accept a job that fits around the timing of their training. This will maximise their chance to contribute meaningfully to the skilled labour needs of Australia. The Productivity Places Program under the Skilling Australia for the Future initiative will deliver 450,000 training places over four years in priority occupations, to help Australian workers develop the skills they need. 175,000 training places are allocated to job seekers, including 20,000 apprenticeship places. Training places for job seekers have been available since April 2008. Priority occupations are occupations assessed as being in demand and occupations for which employers have experienced recruitment difficulty. Changes to the list of priority occupations will be made by Skills Australia – a high level body of experts, comprising economic, industry, academic and expertise in the provision of education or training – established to advise the Government on current and future demand for skills and training. It will identify future and persistent skills shortages as well as industries where retraining and up-skilling of workers may be required to prevent unemployment, under-employment and skills obsolescence. Flexible options for training will be available such as part-time, outside business hours and distance mode training. Innovative strategies may be used to deliver training in regional and remote locations. Training places will be delivered in an industry-driven system, ensuring that training is more responsive to the needs of businesses and participants. Employers can work with their local employment service providers and training organisations to meet their skills demands in priority occupations. Employment service providers will be encouraged to identify job seekers who are eligible for the fully funded training places and encourage them to undertake the training on offer. For Job Network and Disability Employment Network, time spent by a job seeker in approved Skilling Australia training will not count as time in assistance for star rating purposes. This will ensure that time spent in training will be excluded when calculating the speed of placement for star rating purposes. This is of course additional to the benefits of increased employability of job seekers as a result of quality training. The policy on activity test requirements will be improved to enable job seekers to undertake training. To ensure a job seeker is able to complete their training, the job seekers (whether in part-time or full-time training) will only be required to accept a job that fits around the timing of their training. This will maximise their chance to contribute meaningfully to the skilled labour needs of Australia.

19. Local activities underway Ballarat developments Council’s Ballarat West Structure Plan covers 18 sq km and will be the site of most of the city’s future residential development. When completed, it will accommodate around 40,000 people and will include commercial and residential developments – final approval is expected in April 2008; Part of the above scheme is the development of a $80-90 million shopping centre; A planning application has been lodged for the redevelopment of the Ballarat Golf Club. The Council planning scheme has been amended and the land re-zoned. When completed, the project will result in the creation of 400 housing sites as well as retail development and a reconfigured golf course; Discussion and planning continues on the proposed Lake Federation development which would result in a 3000 site and $500 million residential development over the next 15 years; Redevelopment of the Civic Hall site to incorporate a 1000 seat convention centre for conferences and major events is currently planned; Developments in the Pyrenees Shire Goldfields Reserve community centre - The multi-use complex in Beaufort was opened in May 2007 to provide new and expanded facilities for the sporting, community and educational needs of the town. It features a function centre, gymnasium, child-care facilities, meeting rooms and a commercial kitchen. The centre was built with grants from the Federal and State Governments — $1.16 million from the State Government, $400,000 from the Federal Government, $416,320 from the Pyrenees Shire and generous support from local community organisations. The Bendigo Bank is a major sponsor of the facility, and is paying for the ongoing operating costs of the building; Wind Farms Waubra - the Waubra Wind Farm, which straddles the boundary between the Pyrenees Shire and the City of Ballarat, will comprise 128 wind turbines, with associated access tracks, substations and an operations centre. Each turbine will generate 1.5 megawatts (MW), providing a total installed capacity of 192MW. The energy generated each year will provide for 143,000 households. Construction began on November 16, 2006, with the civil works, including construction of access tracks and turbine foundations. The turbines will start to go up in late 2007 and continue through to mid-2008. The wind farm is expected to be operational by mid-2008. Acciona Energy is using local construction and manufacturing skills, and local equipment and materials wherever possible. The construction of the wind farm will, at its peak, create about 200 jobs. There will be about 30 permanent jobs in operating the wind farm. More than 20 regional businesses are involved as subcontractors, and 15 regional people are working directly for Leighton Contractors, who were selected to undertake the civil works; Lexton wind farm - A permit for 19 turbines at Lexton was granted in January 2007. The site consists of two distinct areas, between two and eight kilometres south-west of Lexton. The site is cleared agricultural land used for sheep grazing. The project, with a capital investment of about $48.5 million, is expected to generate up to 28.5 megawatts of power – enough to power more than 16,000 homes. Landsborough and Avoca water quality - Council received confirmation from Central Highlands Water that the Landsborough/Navarre water supply will be improved by the installation of a centralised desalination treatment plant. Construction of this plant will begin in April 2008. Central Highlands Water is developing an options paper to improve water quality in Avoca. A possible upgrade to the Avoca water supply has been incorporated into Central Highlands Water’s five-year water plan; Developments for the Central Goldfields Shire Council The State Government has committed funding of $45million to the Shire for investment in the key areas of health, education, law and order and assistance to economic development activities initiated by the Central Goldfields Shire Council. Additional transport infrastructure projects In December 2006, the Pyrenees Shire Council was successful in its application for $4.5 million funding for the Eurambeen-Streatham Road. The funding, from the federal government’s Auslink Strategic Regional Program, is added to contributions from the state government, the Pyrenees Shire, the Rural City of Ararat, and the grains industry and transport users. The first section of the of the road — a 3.5 kilometre section near the Lakaput grain silos — is now complete. The project will cost $10.5 million, and most of the work is expected to be completed in the 2007-08 year; The Pyrenees Shire received an extra allocation of $917,775 under the federal government’s Roads to Recovery program. The program was established to help councils upgrade their local road infrastructure, which is often beyond the financial capacity of local government. The extra allocations are intended to give councils the chance to accelerate their road upgrading programs. The money must be spent by June 30, 2009, and the Roads to Recovery program itself will run until 2014; New railway station at Wendouree – building to commence mid-2008; Proposal to provide pilot training – estimated 600 per year from Singapore, China and India. Proposal includes possible funding from DIIRD to provide a $5 million building at the airport. Ballarat developments Council’s Ballarat West Structure Plan covers 18 sq km and will be the site of most of the city’s future residential development. When completed, it will accommodate around 40,000 people and will include commercial and residential developments – final approval is expected in April 2008; Part of the above scheme is the development of a $80-90 million shopping centre; A planning application has been lodged for the redevelopment of the Ballarat Golf Club. The Council planning scheme has been amended and the land re-zoned. When completed, the project will result in the creation of 400 housing sites as well as retail development and a reconfigured golf course; Discussion and planning continues on the proposed Lake Federation development which would result in a 3000 site and $500 million residential development over the next 15 years; Redevelopment of the Civic Hall site to incorporate a 1000 seat convention centre for conferences and major events is currently planned; Developments in the Pyrenees Shire Goldfields Reserve community centre - The multi-use complex in Beaufort was opened in May 2007 to provide new and expanded facilities for the sporting, community and educational needs of the town. It features a function centre, gymnasium, child-care facilities, meeting rooms and a commercial kitchen. The centre was built with grants from the Federal and State Governments — $1.16 million from the State Government, $400,000 from the Federal Government, $416,320 from the Pyrenees Shire and generous support from local community organisations. The Bendigo Bank is a major sponsor of the facility, and is paying for the ongoing operating costs of the building; Wind Farms Waubra - the Waubra Wind Farm, which straddles the boundary between the Pyrenees Shire and the City of Ballarat, will comprise 128 wind turbines, with associated access tracks, substations and an operations centre. Each turbine will generate 1.5 megawatts (MW), providing a total installed capacity of 192MW. The energy generated each year will provide for 143,000 households. Construction began on November 16, 2006, with the civil works, including construction of access tracks and turbine foundations. The turbines will start to go up in late 2007 and continue through to mid-2008. The wind farm is expected to be operational by mid-2008. Acciona Energy is using local construction and manufacturing skills, and local equipment and materials wherever possible. The construction of the wind farm will, at its peak, create about 200 jobs. There will be about 30 permanent jobs in operating the wind farm. More than 20 regional businesses are involved as subcontractors, and 15 regional people are working directly for Leighton Contractors, who were selected to undertake the civil works; Lexton wind farm - A permit for 19 turbines at Lexton was granted in January 2007. The site consists of two distinct areas, between two and eight kilometres south-west of Lexton. The site is cleared agricultural land used for sheep grazing. The project, with a capital investment of about $48.5 million, is expected to generate up to 28.5 megawatts of power – enough to power more than 16,000 homes. Landsborough and Avoca water quality - Council received confirmation from Central Highlands Water that the Landsborough/Navarre water supply will be improved by the installation of a centralised desalination treatment plant. Construction of this plant will begin in April 2008. Central Highlands Water is developing an options paper to improve water quality in Avoca. A possible upgrade to the Avoca water supply has been incorporated into Central Highlands Water’s five-year water plan; Developments for the Central Goldfields Shire Council The State Government has committed funding of $45million to the Shire for investment in the key areas of health, education, law and order and assistance to economic development activities initiated by the Central Goldfields Shire Council. Additional transport infrastructure projects In December 2006, the Pyrenees Shire Council was successful in its application for $4.5 million funding for the Eurambeen-Streatham Road. The funding, from the federal government’s Auslink Strategic Regional Program, is added to contributions from the state government, the Pyrenees Shire, the Rural City of Ararat, and the grains industry and transport users. The first section of the of the road — a 3.5 kilometre section near the Lakaput grain silos — is now complete. The project will cost $10.5 million, and most of the work is expected to be completed in the 2007-08 year; The Pyrenees Shire received an extra allocation of $917,775 under the federal government’s Roads to Recovery program. The program was established to help councils upgrade their local road infrastructure, which is often beyond the financial capacity of local government. The extra allocations are intended to give councils the chance to accelerate their road upgrading programs. The money must be spent by June 30, 2009, and the Roads to Recovery program itself will run until 2014; New railway station at Wendouree – building to commence mid-2008; Proposal to provide pilot training – estimated 600 per year from Singapore, China and India. Proposal includes possible funding from DIIRD to provide a $5 million building at the airport.

20. Possible issues for consideration How can employment service providers assist in supporting immigrants settling in the region? How can employment service providers improve linkages to increase the placement of job seekers? How do employers, employment service providers and other agencies work more effectively together to address skills and labour shortages? VIC STATE OFFICE Listed on the screen are some issues we think might be worth considering as a group. VIC STATE OFFICE Listed on the screen are some issues we think might be worth considering as a group.

21. Developing a local action plan Focus on practical actions for each issue being addressed Identify stakeholders and linkages As I mentioned earlier we would like to come away today with some clear actions to address the labour market issues in this region that we have agreed we want to discuss. The action plan needs to focus on practical actions that can be implemented at a local level. The action plan should include identified deliverables, responsibilities and timelines.As I mentioned earlier we would like to come away today with some clear actions to address the labour market issues in this region that we have agreed we want to discuss. The action plan needs to focus on practical actions that can be implemented at a local level. The action plan should include identified deliverables, responsibilities and timelines.

22. Workshop evaluation to be filled out today Follow up survey of participants to assess specific actions/strategies undertaken Longer term data analysis to assess measurable items and analysis of qualitative information relating directly to each workshop Evaluation strategy We have a strategy to help us in evaluating the workshops and to help us further develop and refine the ‘better connections’ concept. All we really need to do today is to have you fill out the evaluation from – included as a part of the pack on your table - at the end of the workshop. One of the functions DEEWR performs is to follow up leads for projects that might be suitable for funding through one of our funding models. We are happy to discuss ideas and strategies you might have or follow up leads for possible projects to better engage the client groups we have talked about today. Please feel free to contact myself regarding these employer and industry. We have a strategy to help us in evaluating the workshops and to help us further develop and refine the ‘better connections’ concept. All we really need to do today is to have you fill out the evaluation from – included as a part of the pack on your table - at the end of the workshop. One of the functions DEEWR performs is to follow up leads for projects that might be suitable for funding through one of our funding models. We are happy to discuss ideas and strategies you might have or follow up leads for possible projects to better engage the client groups we have talked about today. Please feel free to contact myself regarding these employer and industry.

23. Finish Thank you More information: www.workplace.gov.au/bcw www.workplace.gov.au/regionalreports www.workplace.gov.au/lmip Thank you for participating. The presentation and the outcomes of today’s meeting will be placed on the Workplace portal on the internet (www.workplace.gov.au/bcw). We will circulate the contact list of participants and the action plan.Thank you for participating. The presentation and the outcomes of today’s meeting will be placed on the Workplace portal on the internet (www.workplace.gov.au/bcw). We will circulate the contact list of participants and the action plan.

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