Using the problem solving response to intervention ps rti model for challenging behaviors
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Using the Problem Solving/Response to Intervention (PS/RtI) Model for Challenging Behaviors . True/False. PS/RtI for behavior begins with the school wide behavior system. _______ Hypotheses are not useful in the behavior RtI process. ______

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True/False Model for Challenging Behaviors

  • PS/RtI for behavior begins with the school wide behavior system. _______

  • Hypotheses are not useful in the behavior RtI process. ______

  • Research reports that the PS/RtI process is effective for changing behavior in middle schools.______

  • An example of a Tier 2 behavior intervention is small group counseling/social skills training.______

  • RtI behavior interventions should not be done

    in the classroom. ______


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Purpose of Meeting Model for Challenging Behaviors

  • Review School Behavior Data

  • Review PS/RtI and The Three Tiers

    of Behavior

  • Problem Solve School Data


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School –Based Behavior Data Model for Challenging Behaviors

  • Event Count by Month

  • Event Count by Location

  • Incident Count by Description

  • Action Count by Description

    See next slide to make predictions.


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Office Discipline Worksheet Model for Challenging Behaviors Make predictions in the following categories.

  • Where do most of the behavior incidents occur (i.e. class,

    cafeteria, etc.)? 

  • What are the most common ODR incidents (i.e. inappropriate behavior, non-compliance, dress code, etc.)?  

  • What are some consequences for ODR’s (i.e. call home, suspension, etc.)? 

  • During which months do most ODR’s occur?  

  • How much time typically is devoted to the ODR incident process?

    DISPLAY CHARTS


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Time Lost With ODR Model for Challenging Behaviors

(Office Discipline Referral)

PBS (Positive Behavior Support) research documents that for every ODR:

  • 15 minutes of teacher time is lost.

  • 30 minutes of administrator time is lost.

  • 45 minutes of student instructional time is lost.

    90 minutes of time is lost with each ODR.


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Step 1 – Problem Identification: Model for Challenging Behaviors What is the problem?

To identify a problem, begin with three pieces of data

  • Expected level of performance

  • Student level of performance

  • Peer level of performance


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Form hypotheses about why the student (or group of students) is not demonstrating the expected behavior.

Validate hypotheses through data collection.

Step 2 - Problem Analysis: Why is it occurring?


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Hypothesis Example is not demonstrating the expected behavior.

In reviewing and analyzing their Office Discipline Referrals (ODR’s), XYZ Middle School determined that 150 out of 200 referrals were for dress code violations. If district dress code policy was reviewed with all students weekly and appropriate dress positively reinforced, there would be a decrease in ODR’s for dress code violations.


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Step 3 – Intervention Design: is not demonstrating the expected behavior.What are we going to do?

  • Match intervention type and intensity to student(s), setting, problem.

  • Interventions must focus on teaching replacement behavior.

  • Select evidence-based interventions that match context of school/classroom culture.

  • Provide support for implementation.

    • Coaching

    • Evaluation of implementation integrity


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Goal is not demonstrating the expected behavior.

Step 4 – Progress Monitoring: Is it working?

  • Making instructional / intervention decisions based on review and analysis of student data

  • Progress monitoring always includes graphing

Classroom

Intervention I

Classroom

Intervention 2

11


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Tier III of Behavioral Intervention/Support is not demonstrating the expected behavior.

Tier III: Assessments

FBA

Progress Monitoring Graph/RtI

(Eligibility Assessment)

Tier III: Individualized Interventions

Behavior Intervention Plan

Individual CounselingSelf-Monitoring

1 - 5%

1-5%

Tier II Assessments

Behavioral Observations

Intervention Data

Gap Analysis

Tier IITargeted Interventions

Targeted Group Interventions

Social Skills Training

Small Groups

10-15%

80 - 90%

Tier I Assessments

Discipline Data (ODR)

Benchmark Assessment

Universal Screening

Tier I Core Interventions

School-wide Discipline Positive Behavior Supports

Whole-class Interventions

10 - 15%

80 - 90%

12


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Tier I is not demonstrating the expected behavior.

  • Key Questions

    • How effective are school-wide programs and positive behavior supports?

    • How well are Tier I interventions implemented?

  • Data Analysis - Sources for data gathering

    • Discipline data - Office discipline referrals (ODR)

    • Disaggregated data & school climate surveys

    • PBS (Positive Behavior Support) Benchmark Assessment

    • Universal screening (mental health & behavior)


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Tier 1: Universal Interventions is not demonstrating the expected behavior.

  • School wide rules and expectations

  • Positive reinforcement system

  • School Wide Social Skills Program

  • School Wide Problem Solving Skills


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Tier 2 is not demonstrating the expected behavior.

  • Key Questions

    • Which students need targeted interventions?

    • How effective are targeted interventions?

    • How are targeted interventions linked to Tier I?

    • How well are Tier II interventions implemented?

  • Data Analysis - Progress monitor with

    • Individual student data on intensity of behavior (frequency, duration)

    • Behavior Progress Report Form


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At-risk students who may need more support is not demonstrating the expected behavior.

These students represent less than 25% of school enrollment

They account for over 50% of behavioral incidents

They consume significant amounts of time and resources

Targeted Group Interventions

5%

15%

80% of Students


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Tier 2: Targeted Small Group Interventions is not demonstrating the expected behavior.

  • Small group counseling/ social skills training

  • Check In-Check Out Systems

  • Behavior Contracts

  • Point Cards

    (Continue all Tier 1 interventions)


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Tier 3 is not demonstrating the expected behavior.

  • Key Questions

    • What specific interventions are needed at Tier III? Increased intensity of Tier II intervention? Different, individualized intervention?

    • How well are Tier III interventions implemented?

    • What is the student’s response to evidence-based interventions?

  • Data Analysis

    • Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA)

    • Graph of Response to Intervention data


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Tier 3: Individual Intensive Interventions is not demonstrating the expected behavior.

  • Individual counseling

  • Function-based interventions

  • Behavior contracts

  • Prevent-Teach-Reinforce


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Analyzing the data, how well do your school wide expectations work?

  • How well do the expectations work in the

    • Classrooms

    • Common areas

    • Cafeteria

    • Bus

    • Other

  • Identify areas where expectations are not working and develop hypotheses to determine why expectations are not working.

    Examples: How are expectations communicated?

    How are expectations taught?

    Are expectations consistently reinforced?

  • Based on your hypothesis statement, what are some interventions that would reduce the behavior problems in specific areas?


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True/False expectations work?

  • PS/RtI for behavior begins with the school wide behavior system.

  • Hypotheses are not useful in the behavior RtI process.

  • Research reports that the PS/RtI process is effective for changing behavior in middle schools.

  • An example of a Tier 2 behavior intervention is small group counseling/social skills training.

  • RtI behavior interventions should not be done in the classroom.


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Resources expectations work?

Dr. Linda Fowler

RtI Resource Specialist

Professional Development

941-751-6550 ext. 2218

Jessica Clark Kearbey

Secretary II

Professional Development

941-751-6550 ext. 2293

Kathy Haugan

RtI Resource Specialist

Professional Development

941-751-6550 ext. 2256

Karen Mills

Behavior Specialist

ESE Department

941-751-6550 ext. 2239


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