Akg c414b cardioid setting
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AKG C414B Cardioid Setting PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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AKG C414B Cardioid Setting. The Spec’s. Transducer type: Dual diaphragm, 1 in. (25 mm) dia. pressure gradient Diaphragm material: Gold-sputtered mylar foil Frequency response: 20 Hz - 20 kHz (+1.5/-1.0 dB) Polar patterns: Omnidirectional, cardioid,hypercardioid and figure-eight

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AKG C414B Cardioid Setting

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Akg c414b cardioid setting

AKG C414B Cardioid Setting


The spec s

The Spec’s

  • Transducer type: Dual diaphragm, 1 in. (25 mm) dia. pressure gradient

  • Diaphragm material: Gold-sputtered mylar foil

  • Frequency response: 20 Hz - 20 kHz (+1.5/-1.0 dB)

  • Polar patterns: Omnidirectional, cardioid,hypercardioid and figure-eight

  • Impedance: 180 ohms

  • Recommended load impedance: greater than 600 ohms

  • Output connector: XLR (pin 2 positive, per IEC standard)

  • Sensitivity at 1 kHz: 12.5 mV/Pa; -38 dB (dB re 1 V)

  • Self noise level (A-weighted): 14 dB

  • Sound pressure level for 0.5% THD: 140 dB (160 dB SPL with -20 dB)

  • Frequency Response (typical) 30 Hz - 20 kHz

  • S/N ratio re 1 Pa (A-weighted): 80 dB

  • Operating temperature: 14° F to 140° F (-10°C to + 60°C)

  • Relative humidity: 90% (+20°C), 85% (60°C)

  • Pre-attenuation switch: -10 or -20 dB

  • Low frequency roll-off: 12 dB/octave below 75 or 150 Hz

  • Power requirement: 12 to 48 V phantom power nominal

  • Standard accessories: H100 Spider shock mount & Foam windscreen


Shure sm58

Shure SM58

  • Shure SM58 (~100.00 – 150.00)

  • Frequency response tailored for vocals, with brightened midrange and bass rolloff

  • Uniform cardioid pickup pattern isolates the main sound source and minimizes background noise

  • Pneumatic shock-mount system cuts down handling noise

  • Built-in spherical wind and pop filter


Sonic characteristics

Sonic Characteristics

  • Presence Peak

    Enhances speech intelligibility.


Sm58 specifications

SM58 Specifications

  • Type Dynamic (moving coil)

  • Frequency Response 50 to 15,000 Hz

  • Polar Pattern Unidirectional (cardioid), rotationally symmetrical about microphone axis, uniform with frequency

  • Sensitivity (at 1,000 Hz Open Circuit Voltage) –54.5 dBV/Pa (1.85 mV) - 1 Pa = 94 dB SPL

  • Impedance Rated impedance is 150 (300 actual) for connection to microphone inputs rated low impedance

  • Polarity Positive pressure on diaphragm produces positive voltage on pin 2 with respect to pin 3


The pad roll off switch

The Pad & Roll Off Switch

PAD

  • A switch that reduces microphone sensitivity so that it may endure a higher SPL level before distortion occurs.

  • Usually -10db and sometimes -20db.

    Roll Off

  • The low end roll off (high pass filter) decreases bass response and assists with proximity effect or excessive plosives.

  • Usually about 80hz.


Sound pressure level

Sound Pressure Level

  • The term most often used in measuring the magnitude of sound.

  • It is a relative quantity in that it is the ratio between the actual SOUND PRESSURE and a fixed reference pressure.

  • This reference pressure is usually that of the THRESHOLD OF HEARING


Phase cancellation comb filtering

Phase Cancellation & Comb Filtering

  • A microphone positioned near a reflective surface receives a direct signal from the sound source, and a reflected signal from the surface. The reflected sound travels a longer distance and arrives at the microphone later than the direct signal. The direct and delayed signals combine at the mic diaphragm. This causes an uneven frequency response called comb filtering, which results in an unnatural sound quality.

  • The figure above shows a poor way to mike a person at a lectern. The microphone is too far away from the mouth resulting in pickup of reflected sound from the lectern’s surface. This will result in an audible comb-filter effect, which sounds hollow or tonally colored.

  • The figure below shows a better way to mike a person at a lectern. The microphone is close to the mouth (about 8 inches). The sound reflected from the lectern arrives toward the rear of the mic, where sound is rejected. This will greatly reduce the audible comb-filter effect.


Comb filter solutions

Comb Filter Solutions

  • Sometimes, One Mic is BetterWhen multiple mics are used on the same sound source, they receive the source at different times due to their differing distances from the sound. It takes longer for the sound to arrive at the more distant microphone and there is a phase difference between the mic signals when they combine at the mixer.

  • The phase difference causes comb filtering. Some frequencies are amplified and others disappear. The frequency response graph looks like comb with deep sharp troughs and big round teeth.

  • Use only one microphone (unless there is a desired stereo effect) and avoid reflective surfaces nearby.

  • The 3-to-1 RuleWhen using multiple microphones, comb filtering effects can be minimized by using the 3-to-1 rule.

  • The rule states that the distance between microphones should be at least three times the distance from each microphone to its intended sound source. The delayed sound picked up by the more distant microphone is attenuated due the inverse square law of sound. This attenuation reduces the audible effects of comb filtering.


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