Analysis of veterinary education programs for public private veterinarians
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Analysis of Veterinary Education Programs for Public & Private Veterinarians. Dr. Ron DeHaven CEO & Executive Vice President American Veterinary Medical Association OIE Global Conference on Veterinary Education & the Role of the Veterinary Statutory Body December 4-6, 2013

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Analysis of Veterinary Education Programs for Public & Private Veterinarians

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Analysis of veterinary education programs for public private veterinarians

Analysis of Veterinary Education Programs for Public & Private Veterinarians

Dr. Ron DeHaven

CEO & Executive Vice President

American Veterinary Medical Association

OIE Global Conference on Veterinary Education & the

Role of the Veterinary Statutory Body

December 4-6, 2013

Foz do Iguazu, Brazil


Veterinary education

Veterinary Education

“The foundation of every state is the education of its youth.”

- Diogenes Laertius; 3rdcentury AD


Outline

Outline

  • OIE definitions

  • OIE ad hoc Group on Veterinary Education

  • Quality assurance of veterinary education

  • Role of veterinary statutory bodies

  • Take home messages


National veterinary services

National Veterinary Services

Governmental and non-governmental organisations that implement animal health and welfare measures and other standards and recommendations in the Terrestrial Code and the OIE Aquatic Animal Health Code in the territory. …are under the overall control and direction of the Veterinary Authority. Private sector organisations, veterinarians, veterinary paraprofessionals or aquatic animal health professionals are normally accredited or approved by the Veterinary Authority to deliver the delegated functions.


Veterinary statutory body

Veterinary Statutory Body

An autonomous regulatory body for veterinarians and veterinary para-professionals.


Education in the terrestrial code

Education in the Terrestrial Code

Article 3.2.14: Outlines appropriate requirements for the self-evaluation or evaluation of Veterinary Services, to include, under veterinary education:

  • number of veterinary schools;

  • length of veterinary course (years);

  • curriculum addressing the minimum competencies of day 1 veterinary graduates and the post-graduate and continuing education topics to assure the delivery of quality veterinary services, as described in the relevant chapter(s) of the Terrestrial Code;

  • international recognition of veterinary degree.


Education and the performance of veterinary services

Education and the Performance of Veterinary Services

  • The quality of education, both initial and continuing, is a critical building block of effective Veterinary Services.

    • Where inadequacies are identified, specific follow-up activities, such as OIE Twinning Agreements, may be considered.


Oie ad hoc group on veterinary education

OIE ad hoc Group on Veterinary Education

  • Established following first OIE Global Conference “Evolving Education for a Safer World” in November 2009.

  • Five in-person meetings between June 2010 and July 2012 plus electronic communications.


Ad hoc group members

Ad hoc Group Members

  • Dr. Ron DeHaven, USA [Chair]

  • Dr. SaebNazmi El-Sukhon, Jordan

  • Dr. Louis Joseph Pangui, Senegal

  • Dr. Brian G. Bedard, The World Bank

  • Dr.TjeerdJorna, WVA

  • Dr.Froilán Enrique Peralta, Paraguay

  • Dr. EtienneBonbon, DG-SANCO

  • Prof. Pierre Lekeux, Belgium

  • Dr. Timothy Ogilvie, Canada

  • Dr. Dao Bui Tran Anh, Vietnam


Ad hoc group goals

Ad hoc Group Goals

  • Core competencies for all veterinarians that are relevant to the effective delivery of National Veterinary Services.

  • Address particular needs of developing countries


Tenets of ad hoc group

Tenets of ad hoc Group

  • Only some veterinarians will focus careers on delivery of National Veterinary Services, BUT

  • All veterinarians are responsible for promoting animal health & welfare and veterinary public health, AND

  • Many veterinarians perform work for National Veterinary Services, THUS THE NEED FOR…


Ad hoc group work products

Ad hoc Group Work Products

…development of minimum competencies and model core curriculum relative to delivery of entry-level National Veterinary Services.


Minimum competencies document

Minimum Competencies Document

  • Two sections

    • Basic Competencies: minimum knowledge, skills, attitudes and aptitudes required for a veterinarian to be licensed by a VSB.

    • Advanced Competencies: minimum knowledge, skills, attitudes and aptitudes required for a veterinarian to work within the Veterinary Authority.


Basic general competencies

Basic General Competencies

  • Basic veterinary sciences

    • Taught early in the curriculum

    • Prerequisite to clinical studies

  • Clinical veterinary sciences

    • Competencies necessary to diagnose, treat and prevent animal diseases

  • Animal production

    • Includes health management and economics of animal production.


Basic specific competencies

Basic Specific Competencies

  • Directly relate to critical competencies in OIE Terrestrial Code

  • Each is defined, and learning objectives for the entry-level veterinarian are provided.


Specific competencies outlined

Specific Competencies Outlined

  • Epidemiology

  • Transboundaryanimal diseases

  • Zoonoses

  • Emerging/re-emerging diseases

  • Disease prevention & control programmes

  • Food hygiene

  • Veterinary products

  • Animal welfare

  • Veterinary legislation and ethics

  • General certification procedures

  • Communication skills


  • Advanced competencies

    Advanced Competencies

    • Instruction introduced during professional curriculum

    • Expertise better obtained through postgraduate CE and on-the-job training

    • Objective for the Day 1 graduate is to have a general awareness of, and appreciation for, each competency.


    Advanced competencies outlined

    Advanced Competencies Outlined

    • Organisation of Veterinary Services

    • Inspection and certification procedures

    • Management of contagious disease

    • Food hygiene

    • Application of risk analysis

    • Research

    • International trade framework

    • Administration and management


    Minimum competencies serve as guidance for

    Minimum Competencies Serve as Guidance for…

    • Veterinary Education Establishments (VEE) in developing countries and countries with in-transition economies as they enhance and refine curricula.

    • OIE PVS assessors during evaluation of the education component of National Veterinary Services


    Pathway to competencies

    Pathway to Competencies

    Now need a tool to aid in developing and implementing a curriculum to teach these competencies and arrive at the expected outcomes.

    Model Core Veterinary Curriculum


    Scope of model curriculum

    Scope of Model Curriculum

    • Primarily for developing and in-transition countries

      • Tools to improve quality of veterinary medical education

      • An initial step to enhance National Veterinary Services

    • NOT recommending adoption of a single global curriculum


    Model core curriculum

    Model Core Curriculum

    • Maps courses to competencies

    • Provides recommendations on when each course should be taught in curriculum (early, mid, late)

    • Guideline for VEE’s seeking to improve educational quality


    Competencies mapped example

    Competencies MappedExample


    Quality assurance of veterinary education

    Quality Assurance of Veterinary Education

    • Necessary to ensure VEEs meet- and continue to meet - established standards

    • Involves internal and external processes

    • Establishes process for continual improvement


    Accreditation

    Accreditation

    Process of applying standard requirements reflecting societal and professional expectations of an educational institution or program

    • Peer review is conducted by stakeholders in the academic program under evaluation.

    • Government recognition of accreditation process confers consequences to results.

    • Accreditation forms the basis on which to ensure delivery of effective Veterinary Services


    Accreditation components

    Accreditation Components

    • Establish minimum standards

    • Self-evaluation prepared by the program assessing how it meets each standard

    • Peer review and on-site visit by third-party experts

    • Accreditation decision by recognized accreditor based on whether program meets standards

    • Ongoing review on a regular cycle


    Examples of accrediting entities

    Examples ofAccrediting Entities

    • Australia and New Zealand

      • Australasian Veterinary Boards Council

    • United Kingdom

      • Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons

    • USA & Canada

      • AVMA Council on Education


    Role of veterinary statutory bodies

    Role of Veterinary Statutory Bodies

    An autonomous regulatory body for veterinarians and veterinary para-professionals

    Incorporating veterinary educational prerequisites and requirements into governance documents that regulate the profession to help ensure those who are licensed have an adequate knowledge and skills to practice the profession


    Veterinary statutory bodies usa

    Veterinary Statutory BodiesUSA

    • Individual states license veterinarians so that they may legally practise veterinary medicine in that state.

    • Licensure is a stategovernmentactivity, with authority granted by the state legislature to the veterinary regulatory board in each state.


    Key take home message 1

    Key Take-Home Message #1

    OIE minimum competencies and model core curriculum are excellent tools to assist educational programs, particularly in developing countries.


    Key take home message 2

    Key Take-Home Message #2

    OIE minimum competencies and model core curriculum are excellent tools to help in the PVS assessment as it relates to quality of veterinary education.


    Key take home message 3

    Key Take-Home Message #3

    Ongoing quality assurance of veterinary and para-veterinary educational programs is important to the advance the profession - and may be best carried out on a national or regional level to reflect differences in societal needs and professional expectations.


    Key take home message 4

    Key Take-Home Message #4

    Government recognition of minimum educational standards for veterinarians and para-veterinarians practicing in the private and public sectors helps ensure quality of the profession, which in turn improves animal and human health and welfare.


    Analysis of veterinary education programs for public private veterinarians

    Thank You!


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