Chapter 4 section 3
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 36

Chapter 4 Section 3 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 72 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Chapter 4 Section 3. How much gas is produced?. Date: HW: CTG p. 285 # 3 -8. Do Now: WDYS, WDYT p. 274 Agenda: WDYS, WDYT Investigate: part A. Stoichiometry ( def ). The study of the relationships or ratios between two or more substances undergoing a physical or chemical change.

Download Presentation

Chapter 4 Section 3

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Chapter 4 section 3

Chapter 4 Section 3

How much gas is produced?


Date hw ctg p 285 3 8

Date:HW: CTG p. 285 # 3-8

Do Now:

WDYS, WDYT p. 274

Agenda:

WDYS, WDYT

Investigate: part A


Stoichiometry def

Stoichiometry (def)

  • The study of the relationships or ratios between two or more substances undergoing a physical or chemical change


Investigate part a

Investigate, Part A

  • Grab a bag of pennies from the teacher—do no open the bag of pennies!

    • You will also get a penny—don’t lose this.

  • The scales are around the room.

    Answerquestions 1 a-c


Do now

Do Now

I give you a bag of M&M’s. Knowing what you know in class, you weigh the bag with the M&M’s and it comes out to be about 350g. You then weigh one M&M and it comes out to be 0.75g. You then eat the M&M’s and you find that the bag itself weights about 1.3g.

  • How many M&M’s were there?


Investigate part a1

Investigate Part A

  • For number 2a, find the rule


Investigate part a2

Investigate Part A

  • For number 3, read through the paragraphs and answer letter a

  • Once completed, complete number 4

  • Read through number 5.


4 16 12 warm up

4/16/12 Warm Up

I have a bag of peanuts that weighs 70000g. If I weigh one peanut and it is 0.6g, how many peanuts do I have? (The bag weighs 25g)


Recap of investigation

Recap of Investigation


What are some examples

What are some examples…

  • Write out a domino for the following conversions:

    • 1 day = 24 hours

    • 1 hour = 60 minutes

    • 1 g of water = 1mL of water

      (remember to include units!)


The mole

The mole…

  • The mass of one atom is too small to measure

  • So we use one mole of atoms to make a calculation

    • 1 atom of H = 1 amu

    • 1 mole of H = 1 g


Investigation

Investigation

  • Answer 7 a-d knowing what we just went through.

  • When finished, make DOMINOES for each of them.


Investigate part a3

Investigate Part A

  • When you have a molecule, you must find all the individual components….

    H2O

    • 2 atoms of Hydrogen

    • 1 atom of Oxygen


Investigate part a4

Investigate, Part A

  • Complete number 8 on p. 276 (you have 5 minutes)


Investigate part a5

Investigate, Part A

  • When you have a molecule, you must add up all the individual components to find the mass:

    H2O = 18 amus

    • 2 atoms of Hydrogen (1 amu each, so 2 amus)

    • 1 atom of Oxygen (16 amu each, so 16 amu)


Investigate part a6

Investigate, Part A

  • Complete number 9 on p. 276


4 17 12 warm up

4/17/12 Warm Up

For the next few problems, use CaCO3

  • How much of each individual atom is present in the molecule?

  • How much does one mole of this compound weigh?


Investigation part a

Investigation, Part A

  • Do number 10 a-c on p. 276.

    • Use the example of water to help you!


Investigate part a7

Investigate, Part A

11 a:


Investigate part a8

Investigate, Part A

Complete 11 b-d (looks similar to what you see)

Only use the dominoes from the previous problem!


Investigate part b

Investigate, Part B

  • Read aloud number 1

    2AgNO3 + CaCl2 2AgCl + Ca(NO3)2


Investigate part b1

Investigate, Part B

  • Read aloud number 1

    2AgNO3 + CaCl2 2AgCl + Ca(NO3)2

If I have 5 moles CaCl2 How many moles of AgCl do I have?

If I have 5 moles AgNO3 How many moles Ca(NO3)2 do I have?


Investigate part b2

Investigate, Part B

  • You have 5 minutes to answer 1 a-d

    • Remember, make dominoes like the one on the last slide!


3 18 12 warm up

3/18/12 Warm Up

If I have 3 moles of NaNO3, how many grams are present?

If I have 38g of NaNO3, how many moles are present?


Chapter 4 section 3

Use the following equation to solve the problem:

Ba(NO3)2 + 2AgCl  BaCl2 + 2AgNO3

If I have 3 moles of Ba(NO3)2, How many moles of AgNO3 are produced?


4 23 12 warm up

4/23/12 Warm Up

For the next few problems, use the equation below:

2KClO3 2KCl + 3O2

If I react 4 moles of KClO3, how many moles of KCl will I get as a product?

How many moles of O2 will I then get?


Investigate part c

Investigate, Part C

  • Read aloud number 1 on p. 277

    • You can use dominoes to calculate the amount of gas!


Examples

Examples

  • 1a: How many liters will 4 moles of hydrogen gas occupy?

  • 1b: If an oxygen balloon fills 11.2L, how many moles of O2 are in it?

  • Complete 1c on your own!


Investigate part c1

Investigate, Part C

  • Read aloud and complete number 3 together.


1 simple one step problems

1) Simple One-Step Problems:

If I have 7 g of H2O, how many moles do I have?


1 simple one step problems1

1) Simple One-Step Problems:

If I have 7 moles of CaCO3, how many grams do I have?


1 simple one step problems2

1) Simple One-Step Problems:

If I have 7 moles of H2O (g), how many Liters do I have?


2 more complex multistep problems

2) (more) Complex Multistep Problems

In the following reaction:

2H2 + O22 H2O

1) If I start out with 8 g of H2, how many moles of H2O do I end up with?

2) How many g of H2O


2 more complex multistep problems1

2) (more) Complex Multistep Problems

In the following reaction:

2 Na (s) + Cl2(g) 2 NaCl (s)

1) If I start out with 8 g of Na, how many moles of Cl2 do I end up with?

2) How many g of NaCl?


Summary

Summary

  • Essential Questions, p. 283

    --How do you know?

    --Why do you believe

    --Why should you care


  • Login