Slide1 l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 13

Linking Methodologies to Theories in Sustainability Science Lennart Olsson & Barry Ness LUCSUS – Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Sweden PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 116 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: Sports / Games

Linking Methodologies to Theories in Sustainability Science Lennart Olsson & Barry Ness LUCSUS – Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Sweden. www.lucsus.lu.se. World View. From science to society. Scientific understanding. Goals . Strategies. Implementation. Deliberately.

Download Presentation

Linking Methodologies to Theories in Sustainability Science Lennart Olsson & Barry Ness LUCSUS – Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Sweden

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Slide1 l.jpg

Linking Methodologies to Theories

in Sustainability Science

Lennart Olsson & Barry Ness

LUCSUS – Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Sweden

www.lucsus.lu.se


Slide2 l.jpg

World View


Slide3 l.jpg

From science to society

Scientific understanding

Goals

Strategies

Implementation


Slide4 l.jpg

Deliberately

By accident


Slide5 l.jpg

What is Sustainability Science?

A science that studies and contributes to sustainability transitions.

  • A science that explores two voids:

  • between natural and social science

  • between science and the workings of society

A science that seeks new solutions to wicked problems.

A science that seeks syntheses rather than specialisations.


Slide6 l.jpg

The dominating belief underpinning science:

the piecemeal study of the real world.


Slide7 l.jpg

social works

social geography

gender studies

informatics

genetics

media and communication

innovation studies

environmental engineering

economic history

sociology

psychiatry

electronics

water resources eng.

philosophy

public health

biology

theology

archeology

nutrition

nuclear physics

quarternary geology

epidemiology

history

physical geography

orthopedics

atomic physics

limnology

linguistics

psychology

business adm.

social anthropology

fluid mechanics

literature

economics

geophysics

human ecology

ecology

pedagogics

mathematics

ethnology

sociology of law

radiophysics

micro biology

law

arts

business law

political science

chemical engineering

chemistry

economic geography

statistics


Slide8 l.jpg

Natural science doesn’t question its ontology

Social science constantly questions its ontology

Example 1.

Water is an economic good.

Water is a bio-physical entity (H2O) that can exist in three forms – solid, liquid, and gas. It can be studied objectively.

Water-flows in nature are driven by gravity and thermodynamics.

Water is primarily a source of conflict

Water is primarily a source of co-operation

Water-flows in society are driven by power relationships


Slide10 l.jpg

Natural science doesn’t question its ontology

Social science constantly questions its ontology

Example 2.

Carbon is a bio-physical entity. In the form of CO2, it contributes to global warming. The cycling of CO2 can be studied by quantitative and objective methods

The cycling of carbon is embedded in almost all human activities. This cycling is determined by economic, political and social drivers.


Slide11 l.jpg

Fig. 5. Global C cycle showing fossil C stock, CO2 emissions, and fate of CO2 in the 1990s. Carbon stocks are in units of Pg C; annual

flows and changes in atmospheric CO2 are in PgC per year. Net annual absorption by terrestrial and ocean sinks is only roughly known

(House et al., 2003; Houghton, 2003); values shown are from IPCC (2001a). Other sources include: IPCC (2000), Sundquist (1993) and

Rogner (2000). Janzen H.H.: 2005: Carbon cycling in earth systems—a soil science perspective. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment


Slide12 l.jpg

Retrospective

Forecasting

Sustainability assessment

Indicators/

indices

Product related assessments

Integrated assessment

Non-Integrated

Life Cycle Assessment

Conceptual Modelling

Environmental Pressure Indicators

Product material flow analysis

System Dynamics

UNCSD 58

Material Intensity Analysis

Multi-Criteria Analysis

Regional flow assessments

Substance Flow Analysis

Risk Analysis

Input-Output Energy Analysis

Product energy analysis

Uncertainty Analysis

Regional Emergy Analysis

Process Energy Analysis

Vulnerability Analysis

Regional Exergy Analysis

Emergy Analysis

Cost Benefit Analysis

Economy-wide Material Flow Analysis

Exergy Analysis

Impact assessment

Integrated

Life cycle costing

Environmental Impact Assessment

Sustainable National Income

Full Life Cycle Accounting

Strategic Environmental Assessment

Genuine Progress Indicator and ISEW

Life Cycle Cost Assessment

EU Sustainability Impact Assessment

Adjusted Net Savings (Genuine Savings)

Ecological Footprint

Wellbeing Index

Environmental Sustainability Index

Human Development Index

Assessment focus

Ness, B., Urbel-Piirsalu, E., Anderberg, S., Olsson, L., 2007: Categorising tools for sustainability assessment. Ecological Economics. Vol 60, pp 498-508


Slide13 l.jpg

Sustainability science needs to bridge these scientific gaps!

  • Within universities

  • Between universities

  • Across world regions

… and contribute to social change towards sustainability transitions!

www.lucsus.lu.se


  • Login