SharePoint 2010 Communities Overview

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SharePoint 2010 Communities Overview

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1. SharePoint 2010 Communities Overview Presenter GuidancePresenter Guidance

2. Business Usage Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Start with a business objective, and make the business case. This begins with stating the purpose of the business community and what you expect to get out of it. Explain the scope, including the community’s key characteristics and how they relate to its purpose. This business case may include a roadmap laying out the initial scope and broadly outlining the expansion of scope over time. You will also need to define resource requirements and risk factors. When it comes to the scope of your business community, think big, but start small. Although you may have big plans for your collaboration platform, start small and focus on a strategy that scales the user base as quickly as possible. An overly broad scope can result in a network that seems too complex and inhibits audience participation. Make your network simple to use. Remember—Facebook didn’t need to offer training to encourage wide user acceptance. Reaching a critical mass of users. The goal is to create a vibrant collaboration space in which people can share ideas and information in a valuable way. Social networks depend on people: If there are few people in the network who share your interests, you won’t come back. The tipping point illustration shows what happens in a social network as the user base grows. When a critical mass of users is present, collaboration activities jump exponentially. The best way to reach critical mass quickly is to choose an initial scope that provides immediate value. Expand scope based on user demand. As more people become active in the community, the community becomes self-organizing. Users add functionality and grow the network to meet their needs. Membership grows virally, and all those members add their own content to the network. They also govern themselves and manage the community culture so that it serves their interests. The corporate role in overseeing a social network is to define the broader objectives of the community members, employees, partners, and even customers so that their activities within the social network space remain aligned with your organization’s goals. Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Start with a business objective, and make the business case. This begins with stating the purpose of the business community and what you expect to get out of it. Explain the scope, including the community’s key characteristics and how they relate to its purpose. This business case may include a roadmap laying out the initial scope and broadly outlining the expansion of scope over time. You will also need to define resource requirements and risk factors. When it comes to the scope of your business community, think big, but start small. Although you may have big plans for your collaboration platform, start small and focus on a strategy that scales the user base as quickly as possible. An overly broad scope can result in a network that seems too complex and inhibits audience participation. Make your network simple to use. Remember—Facebook didn’t need to offer training to encourage wide user acceptance. Reaching a critical mass of users. The goal is to create a vibrant collaboration space in which people can share ideas and information in a valuable way. Social networks depend on people: If there are few people in the network who share your interests, you won’t come back. The tipping point illustration shows what happens in a social network as the user base grows. When a critical mass of users is present, collaboration activities jump exponentially. The best way to reach critical mass quickly is to choose an initial scope that provides immediate value. Expand scope based on user demand. As more people become active in the community, the community becomes self-organizing. Users add functionality and grow the network to meet their needs. Membership grows virally, and all those members add their own content to the network. They also govern themselves and manage the community culture so that it serves their interests. The corporate role in overseeing a social network is to define the broader objectives of the community members, employees, partners, and even customers so that their activities within the social network space remain aligned with your organization’s goals.

3. Challenges

4. Overview of Business Challenges Increase productivity Reduce operational costs Increase responsivity As business leaders wrestle with their collaboration strategies and decide how to manage all the communication and content-management tools they have now, their people are already building corporate communities and social networks. What is driving this move to corporate social networks? Are they in your company’s long-term best interests? And how should you respond to this new wave of collaboration technology? In today’s corporate environment, information is fragmented among many people. Companies build document repositories to share information. E-mail and instant messaging speeds the transfer of information. But in a typical corporate environment today, solving a problem still means finding the person who knows the answer. Simply identifying the right person can be a challenge. Searching requires contacting people who know people who know the person you need to talk to. In today’s corporate environment, information is fragmented among many people. Companies build document repositories to share information. E-mail and instant messaging speeds the transfer of information. But in a typical corporate environment today, solving a problem still means finding the person who knows the answer. Simply identifying the right person can be a challenge. Searching requires contacting people who know people who know the person you need to talk to. A corporate social network builds business communities that cut across departments and geographies. Within these communities, people with common interests can find and learn about each other more quickly. People can also see where others are located, whether they are available, and how best to reach them. Such a network of communities enables Todd and others to work closely together in the following ways: Quickly find and tap into the right skill sets, talent, and knowledge regardless of where in the world it is located. By always having access to the latest project and individual information, co-workers use real-time meetings more effectively. Team and project sites serve as standing virtual meetings in which asynchronous work is ongoing. People share ideas more readily and organizations capture more knowledge through community interactions. People widely separated by geographical boundaries—or even organizational boundaries in the case of customer or partner virtual teams—feel engaged in an endeavor where their efforts make a difference. One of the most valued aspects of the corporate environment for most employees (beyond competitive salary and benefits) is the opportunity to learn and develop professionally. Business communities and corporate social networks that allow effective collaboration across the enterprise provide a stimulating environment in which people can learn from others and share ideas in a natural, informal way. In a social networking environment, communities are fluid and self-governing—that is, communities form around the relevant interests and objectives of employees, who can choose to what degree they want to participate. As business leaders wrestle with their collaboration strategies and decide how to manage all the communication and content-management tools they have now, their people are already building corporate communities and social networks. What is driving this move to corporate social networks? Are they in your company’s long-term best interests? And how should you respond to this new wave of collaboration technology? In today’s corporate environment, information is fragmented among many people. Companies build document repositories to share information. E-mail and instant messaging speeds the transfer of information. But in a typical corporate environment today, solving a problem still means finding the person who knows the answer. Simply identifying the right person can be a challenge. Searching requires contacting people who know people who know the person you need to talk to. In today’s corporate environment, information is fragmented among many people. Companies build document repositories to share information. E-mail and instant messaging speeds the transfer of information. But in a typical corporate environment today, solving a problem still means finding the person who knows the answer. Simply identifying the right person can be a challenge. Searching requires contacting people who know people who know the person you need to talk to. A corporate social network builds business communities that cut across departments and geographies. Within these communities, people with common interests can find and learn about each other more quickly. People can also see where others are located, whether they are available, and how best to reach them. Such a network of communities enables Todd and others to work closely together in the following ways: Quickly find and tap into the right skill sets, talent, and knowledge regardless of where in the world it is located. By always having access to the latest project and individual information, co-workers use real-time meetings more effectively. Team and project sites serve as standing virtual meetings in which asynchronous work is ongoing. People share ideas more readily and organizations capture more knowledge through community interactions. People widely separated by geographical boundaries—or even organizational boundaries in the case of customer or partner virtual teams—feel engaged in an endeavor where their efforts make a difference. One of the most valued aspects of the corporate environment for most employees (beyond competitive salary and benefits) is the opportunity to learn and develop professionally. Business communities and corporate social networks that allow effective collaboration across the enterprise provide a stimulating environment in which people can learn from others and share ideas in a natural, informal way. In a social networking environment, communities are fluid and self-governing—that is, communities form around the relevant interests and objectives of employees, who can choose to what degree they want to participate.

5. Increase Productivity Building business communities Building individual identities that spans an organization Build flexible groups

6. Reduce Operational Costs Inherent communities – present throughout the solution

7. Increase Responsivity Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

8. SharePoint 2010 Communities Features Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

9. Social Networking My Site Profile Social networking People search Social feedback Publishing Blogs Wikis Key Message SharePoint 2010 provides for business social computing needs form a single platform Presenter Notes This section looks at the core social computing options available in SharePoint 2010. One of the key benefits offered by the SharePoint solution is that is comes as a single, integrated package. This means that user interfaces are consistent and management is integrated. It also provides all the other SharePoint 2010 workloads, which means that your community activities are a natural part of your business activities, rather than one or a series of add-on products that you have to integrate with your line of business systems. Presenter Guidance Key Message SharePoint 2010 provides for business social computing needs form a single platform Presenter Notes This section looks at the core social computing options available in SharePoint 2010. One of the key benefits offered by the SharePoint solution is that is comes as a single, integrated package. This means that user interfaces are consistent and management is integrated. It also provides all the other SharePoint 2010 workloads, which means that your community activities are a natural part of your business activities, rather than one or a series of add-on products that you have to integrate with your line of business systems. Presenter Guidance

10. User Profiles Maintains current user information Multiple sources Sets user context Organization Browser Status Recent activity Common relationships Expertise Ask me about Key Message All social functionality and personalization is based on user profile information. Presenter Notes The core of any social application is the user profile. This is where each user is able to define their personal attributes and whether or not these attributes are publically available or should be private. A user’s My Site is a secure site which exposes their profile details and exposes a host of social functionality such as a new organizational browser, colleagues and contacts, and more. Information about users can come from directory services such as AD DS. It can also come from line-of-business applications, such as SAP. The User Profile Service enables you to bring all of the properties from these diverse content sources together to create unified and consistent user profiles across an organization. The properties and content from these sources are stored in user profiles that are managed by the User Profile Service. User profiles identify connections among users such as common managers, workgroups, group membership, and sites. User profiles also contain information about areas that a user is interested in and help users locate subject matter experts for a particular area. This information enables users to find one another by using the People Search feature. In this manner, the relationships among users in an organization can be used to encourage more efficient collaboration with colleagues and across teams. User profiles are more than merely groupings of imported and custom properties about users in an organization. The properties are also used to display information about the relationships of each user to other users in an organization. Profile subtypes can be used to provide more detailed information about a user. For example, you can assign a subtype to the employee property that categorizes a user as either an intern or a full-time employee. Additionally, user profiles and user profile properties can be used to implement personalization features, such as audiences, and the policies that define how information about users is displayed and shared. Every site that uses the same User Profile Service application receives the same set of properties from the user profile store and displays them in the site's user information list. This also includes a list of documents that are shared by each user. Key Message All social functionality and personalization is based on user profile information. Presenter Notes The core of any social application is the user profile. This is where each user is able to define their personal attributes and whether or not these attributes are publically available or should be private. A user’s My Site is a secure site which exposes their profile details and exposes a host of social functionality such as a new organizational browser, colleagues and contacts, and more. Information about users can come from directory services such as AD DS. It can also come from line-of-business applications, such as SAP. The User Profile Service enables you to bring all of the properties from these diverse content sources together to create unified and consistent user profiles across an organization. The properties and content from these sources are stored in user profiles that are managed by the User Profile Service. User profiles identify connections among users such as common managers, workgroups, group membership, and sites. User profiles also contain information about areas that a user is interested in and help users locate subject matter experts for a particular area. This information enables users to find one another by using the People Search feature. In this manner, the relationships among users in an organization can be used to encourage more efficient collaboration with colleagues and across teams. User profiles are more than merely groupings of imported and custom properties about users in an organization. The properties are also used to display information about the relationships of each user to other users in an organization. Profile subtypes can be used to provide more detailed information about a user. For example, you can assign a subtype to the employee property that categorizes a user as either an intern or a full-time employee. Additionally, user profiles and user profile properties can be used to implement personalization features, such as audiences, and the policies that define how information about users is displayed and shared. Every site that uses the same User Profile Service application receives the same set of properties from the user profile store and displays them in the site's user information list. This also includes a list of documents that are shared by each user.

11. My Site Components Key Message My Sites is essential to the development of a successful community Presenter Notes My Site Web sites are personal sites in Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 that provide users in an organization with a rich set of social networking and collaboration features. These features give users a way to discover areas of expertise, projects, and business relationship from one central location. Each user can view his or her My Site Web site by clicking the corresponding user name in the top, right corner of any page and then clicking My Site. Uses and benefits of My Site Web sites In SharePoint Server 2010, My Site Web sites enable users to easily share information about themselves and their work. This sharing of information encourages collaboration, builds and promotes expertise, and targets relevant content to the people who want to see it. You can customize content to each user in any organization, and enable administrators to set policies to protect privacy. My Site Web sites in SharePoint Server 2010 include the following: A profile for each user where users can share their expertise, profile pictures, and so on A newsfeed for tracking activities such as social tags, status updates, and comments by colleague A tag and note tool that helps you conveniently tag or post notes on sites directly from a Web browser A shared picture library, shared document library, and personal document library The ability to add custom Web Parts such as a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) viewer for viewing RSS feeds from blogs, news sources, and so on An organizational browser that uses Microsoft Silverlight 3 to provide a dynamic organizational browsing experience The ability to manage colleagues and memberships from one location Key Message My Sites is essential to the development of a successful community Presenter Notes My Site Web sites are personal sites in Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 that provide users in an organization with a rich set of social networking and collaboration features. These features give users a way to discover areas of expertise, projects, and business relationship from one central location. Each user can view his or her My Site Web site by clicking the corresponding user name in the top, right corner of any page and then clicking My Site. Uses and benefits of My Site Web sites In SharePoint Server 2010, My Site Web sites enable users to easily share information about themselves and their work. This sharing of information encourages collaboration, builds and promotes expertise, and targets relevant content to the people who want to see it. You can customize content to each user in any organization, and enable administrators to set policies to protect privacy. My Site Web sites in SharePoint Server 2010 include the following: A profile for each user where users can share their expertise, profile pictures, and so on A newsfeed for tracking activities such as social tags, status updates, and comments by colleague A tag and note tool that helps you conveniently tag or post notes on sites directly from a Web browser A shared picture library, shared document library, and personal document library The ability to add custom Web Parts such as a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) viewer for viewing RSS feeds from blogs, news sources, and so on An organizational browser that uses Microsoft Silverlight 3 to provide a dynamic organizational browsing experience The ability to manage colleagues and memberships from one location

12. Social Networking Tracking Colleagues Better, more readable “newsfeed” Tracking colleagues for Extensible for third parties E-mail notifications Note board Colleague addition Keywords suggestions Profile Updates Alerts to update profile Status message Key Message Presenter Notes Status updates and activity feeds: In recent years the social networking trend taking the Internet by storm is micro-blogging, as characterized by Twitter and the status updates on Facebook. SharePoint 2010 introduces this type of capability with deliberate status updates that fit together with an automatic activity monitor. This combination allows SharePoint to offer an activity feed for each user which helps community members keep track of work progress and their colleagues. Knowledge Mining: A user is able to identify which keywords or tags they are interested in keeping track of and which keywords or tags they are willing to answer questions about on their profile. The key phrases are mined through the user’s Sent box from Outlook 2010 and proposed to the user when he/she edits his/her profile. This allows the user to keep the profile updated and active while requiring less effort on the user’s part. Key Message Presenter Notes Status updates and activity feeds: In recent years the social networking trend taking the Internet by storm is micro-blogging, as characterized by Twitter and the status updates on Facebook. SharePoint 2010 introduces this type of capability with deliberate status updates that fit together with an automatic activity monitor. This combination allows SharePoint to offer an activity feed for each user which helps community members keep track of work progress and their colleagues. Knowledge Mining: A user is able to identify which keywords or tags they are interested in keeping track of and which keywords or tags they are willing to answer questions about on their profile. The key phrases are mined through the user’s Sent box from Outlook 2010 and proposed to the user when he/she edits his/her profile. This allows the user to keep the profile updated and active while requiring less effort on the user’s part.

13. People and Expertise Finding Expertise Analysis Expertise Opt-in Expertise Search Key Message Being able to find expertise is real benefit to users and an organization. Presenter Notes Expertise Analysis Keywords from Sent Emails, noun phrase extraction in 6 languages Social Tags for the person Tags used by a person Expertise Opt-in Track as Interests Ask Me About Privacy policy at Enterprise and End-user level Expertise Search High relevance score for “Ask me about” Social Distance as a part of relevance algorithm Filter results by Title and Location Keyword related documents Presenter Guidance Key Message Being able to find expertise is real benefit to users and an organization. Presenter Notes Expertise Analysis Keywords from Sent Emails, noun phrase extraction in 6 languages Social Tags for the person Tags used by a person Expertise Opt-in Track as Interests Ask Me About Privacy policy at Enterprise and End-user level Expertise Search High relevance score for “Ask me about” Social Distance as a part of relevance algorithm Filter results by Title and Location Keyword related documents Presenter Guidance

14. Social Tagging Social tagging Expertise tagging Social bookmarking Key Message Tagging enables users to define provide information about content and resources. Presenter Notes Social Tagging: Social feedback is a new addition to the SharePoint 2010 experience. These new features take the social experience of SharePoint to a whole new level of user participation and interaction, allowing users to discover content and what other users think of that content. Tags: The act of tagging content is the assignment of descriptor words or categories to that content. There are two types of tagging, social tagging and expertise tagging. Social tagging refers to content and adds metadata to content to describe what it is, what it contains, or what it does. Expertise tagging is related to individuals and describes them, such as what they do, which projects they work on, or what special skills they have. Where social tagging of content allows users to organically flex and grow a portal’s information architecture over time, expertise tagging helps build relationships and connections to other people in the organization. Social Bookmarks: Social bookmarking is the practice of sharing bookmarks with a community of users to help build the knowledge and perspective of the community as a whole. Bookmarks in SharePoint replace the 2007 My Links feature and allow a user to define how a link is shared and categorized. SharePoint bookmarks also support the inclusion of non-SharePoint content, through the use of bookmarklets. This feature allows any piece of Internet content to be included in a community’s set of social bookmarks. Key Message Tagging enables users to define provide information about content and resources. Presenter Notes Social Tagging: Social feedback is a new addition to the SharePoint 2010 experience. These new features take the social experience of SharePoint to a whole new level of user participation and interaction, allowing users to discover content and what other users think of that content. Tags: The act of tagging content is the assignment of descriptor words or categories to that content. There are two types of tagging, social tagging and expertise tagging. Social tagging refers to content and adds metadata to content to describe what it is, what it contains, or what it does. Expertise tagging is related to individuals and describes them, such as what they do, which projects they work on, or what special skills they have. Where social tagging of content allows users to organically flex and grow a portal’s information architecture over time, expertise tagging helps build relationships and connections to other people in the organization. Social Bookmarks: Social bookmarking is the practice of sharing bookmarks with a community of users to help build the knowledge and perspective of the community as a whole. Bookmarks in SharePoint replace the 2007 My Links feature and allow a user to define how a link is shared and categorized. SharePoint bookmarks also support the inclusion of non-SharePoint content, through the use of bookmarklets. This feature allows any piece of Internet content to be included in a community’s set of social bookmarks.

15. Feedback Tagging Bookmarking Note board Ratings Key Message Feedback provides real-time experiential support between peer workers Presenter Notes In SharePoint you can tag most things. Consistency is improved here through the ability to use the corporate Term Store to select tags from a list of agreed options, as shown in the graphic. This is extended by the option to create new keywords. The manage keyword control prompts keyword suggestions from the Term Store, based on what the user types. It is also possible to follow tags from other users, as shown at the bottom of the graphic, so you can see what other users are finding useful. This all enhances the community feel of the environment, without the need to constantly query your network friends through e-mail or other more intrusive and slower methods of communication. Bookmarking enables users to select items that they wish to use regularly, either inside or outside SharePoint 2010. These bookmark travel with the user, throughout their working day. The Noteboard gives the ability to add information to a site – almost metadata for a site, rather than for individual items on the site. Ratings enable users to provide user feedback on content, as has already proved so popular in both business and social sites, such as Amazon and Facebook.Key Message Feedback provides real-time experiential support between peer workers Presenter Notes In SharePoint you can tag most things. Consistency is improved here through the ability to use the corporate Term Store to select tags from a list of agreed options, as shown in the graphic. This is extended by the option to create new keywords. The manage keyword control prompts keyword suggestions from the Term Store, based on what the user types. It is also possible to follow tags from other users, as shown at the bottom of the graphic, so you can see what other users are finding useful. This all enhances the community feel of the environment, without the need to constantly query your network friends through e-mail or other more intrusive and slower methods of communication. Bookmarking enables users to select items that they wish to use regularly, either inside or outside SharePoint 2010. These bookmark travel with the user, throughout their working day. The Noteboard gives the ability to add information to a site – almost metadata for a site, rather than for individual items on the site. Ratings enable users to provide user feedback on content, as has already proved so popular in both business and social sites, such as Amazon and Facebook.

16. Tags, Notes and Ratings Key Message SharePoint provides a flexible range of tagging options for site content. Presenter Notes Present based on slide information.Key Message SharePoint provides a flexible range of tagging options for site content. Presenter Notes Present based on slide information.

17. User Generated Content and Participation Blogs Wikis Enterprise Wikis Key Message The next four slides look what SharePoint 2010 offers to users to support easy publishing Key Message The next four slides look what SharePoint 2010 offers to users to support easy publishing

18. Wikis Satisfying user experience Rich content creation Easy content management Key Message Presenter Notes Wikis Wikis became available in SharePoint 2007 as a Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 site template. SharePoint 2007 wikis were a popular feature, frequently used as a dynamic knowledge base and as a mechanism to turn static documents into dynamic and living knowledge repositories. Teams found they could use wikis to easily collaborate with each other. One of the enhancements in SharePoint 2010 is the ability to edit team sites as if they were editing a wiki. This means that users can see a live preview of the changes made to the team site with a wiki experience. Editing the content on a page becomes as simple as clicking the edit tab and typing in the page. In addition it is easier to insert images, SharePoint lists, and Web parts into the team site. Microsoft focused significant attention on transforming the user experience in SharePoint 2010 into a lightweight collaborative authoring experience. For wikis, along with blogs and discussion forums, there is a consistent rich text editor that employs the SharePoint Ribbon. The “wikis everywhere” approach to SharePoint sites is a great asset to information workers who already have enough to do without having to adapt to new collaborative procedures. Now SharePoint 2010 team sites can fit into the flow of their work rather than introducing an extra set of requirements complete with extra sets of skills which must be learned. As sharing content and knowledge with team members becomes easier, the likelihood that sharing will occur goes up. The SharePoint 2010 wiki experience helps make team collaboration a smoother process. Key Message Presenter Notes Wikis Wikis became available in SharePoint 2007 as a Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 site template. SharePoint 2007 wikis were a popular feature, frequently used as a dynamic knowledge base and as a mechanism to turn static documents into dynamic and living knowledge repositories. Teams found they could use wikis to easily collaborate with each other. One of the enhancements in SharePoint 2010 is the ability to edit team sites as if they were editing a wiki. This means that users can see a live preview of the changes made to the team site with a wiki experience. Editing the content on a page becomes as simple as clicking the edit tab and typing in the page. In addition it is easier to insert images, SharePoint lists, and Web parts into the team site. Microsoft focused significant attention on transforming the user experience in SharePoint 2010 into a lightweight collaborative authoring experience. For wikis, along with blogs and discussion forums, there is a consistent rich text editor that employs the SharePoint Ribbon. The “wikis everywhere” approach to SharePoint sites is a great asset to information workers who already have enough to do without having to adapt to new collaborative procedures. Now SharePoint 2010 team sites can fit into the flow of their work rather than introducing an extra set of requirements complete with extra sets of skills which must be learned. As sharing content and knowledge with team members becomes easier, the likelihood that sharing will occur goes up. The SharePoint 2010 wiki experience helps make team collaboration a smoother process.

19. Wiki editing in Team Sites Key Message Presenter Notes The broadened availability of wikis in SharePoint 2010 is enhanced by the easier editing of wiki pages. Key Message Presenter Notes The broadened availability of wikis in SharePoint 2010 is enhanced by the easier editing of wiki pages.

20. Publishing with Wiki syntax Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

21. User Blogs and Team Blogs Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance User Blogs and Team Blogs Each user within the organization can have their personal blog linked to their My Site making it easy for other people to find. New blog posts are added to the Recent Activity section of the user’s My Site homepage. The new blog site template in SharePoint 2010 features blog-oriented navigation. Navigation elements have been enhanced to allow sorting posts by category and date. The content itself features an AJAX-based page experience when toggling the comment view on and off. There is also a “About this blog” content area that explains the purpose of the blog and introduces the blog author(s). The editing experience for the SharePoint 2010 blog takes advantage of the new rich text editor. The author is able to use the SharePoint Fluent User Interface, or the Ribbon, complete with Live Preview functionality and streamlined image insert capabilities to write and edit content online. The user can also launch an external blogging program such as Microsoft Word or Windows Live Writer for the editing experience. In addition to individual blogs, SharePoint 2010 also has team blogs which allows multiple people to publish blog posts. These can be used for teams working on a project to notify internal customers or other teams who are interested in the status or progress of a project and to provide more self-service for those people within the organization. Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance User Blogs and Team Blogs Each user within the organization can have their personal blog linked to their My Site making it easy for other people to find. New blog posts are added to the Recent Activity section of the user’s My Site homepage. The new blog site template in SharePoint 2010 features blog-oriented navigation. Navigation elements have been enhanced to allow sorting posts by category and date. The content itself features an AJAX-based page experience when toggling the comment view on and off. There is also a “About this blog” content area that explains the purpose of the blog and introduces the blog author(s). The editing experience for the SharePoint 2010 blog takes advantage of the new rich text editor. The author is able to use the SharePoint Fluent User Interface, or the Ribbon, complete with Live Preview functionality and streamlined image insert capabilities to write and edit content online. The user can also launch an external blogging program such as Microsoft Word or Windows Live Writer for the editing experience. In addition to individual blogs, SharePoint 2010 also has team blogs which allows multiple people to publish blog posts. These can be used for teams working on a project to notify internal customers or other teams who are interested in the status or progress of a project and to provide more self-service for those people within the organization.

22. SharePoint 2010 Social Investment Modern UX with AJAX Tagging, Ratings, Bookmarking Note board My Sites Knowledge Mining Blogs Wikis Enterprise Wikis Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

23. Planning

24. Planning Overview Business Planning Adoption Initiative planning Cultural challenges Post-launch strategies Technical Planning Plan platforms User Profile service overview Plan user profiles Plan policies for user profiles Plan for profile synchronization Plan for audiences Plan for My Site Web sites Plan for collaboration sites Plan an Enterprise Wiki Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

25. Business Planning Key Message Social computing goes beyond hardware and software implementation; you must plan for the business impact. Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Social computing goes beyond hardware and software implementation; you must plan for the business impact. Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

26. Essentials for Social Initiative Planning Invest adequate resources Have champions to help you with roll-out Think about adoption strategies early in the project Focus on usefulness, usability, and design in your solution Make sure your solution is compatible with existing systems Start with pilots, learn from these, and implement improvements based on feedback Promote the solution and provide training if needed Manage expectations Key Message It is essential to plan your social computing roll-out Presenter Notes Invest adequate resources This means people, hardware, and time; all of which cost money. Users will expect the same or better response than the social networks they use at home. Any less than this will be a major issue. Have champions to help you with roll-out This means that you must have stakeholder champions who lead the organization and are committed to social computing benefits. It also means that you should have expertise in the office to champion the use of social computing. Think about adoption strategies early in the project A successful roll-out is based on identifying what solutions users will adopt. Do not assume that if you build it then users will use it; you must identify what functionality or capabilities will ensure adoption in your organization. Focus on usefulness, usability, and design in your solution To encourage adoption, you need to check for these three elements. If a solution is not useful – as opposed to entertaining – it will not have a long term future. Make sure that your users can easily understand how the solution works. Social computing is essentially viral, so if something is difficult then it will probably not succeed as a social initiative. Have consistency of design – your social initiatives should adhere to a consistent social brand, as they would to a corporate brand. Make sure your solution is compatible with existing systems Start with pilots, learn from these, and implement improvements based on feedback We are all very aware of the functional and fit of IT systems such as e-mail and accounts, but we are less certain of the place of social computing in the workplace. Make sure of your design and pilot implementation before you consider rollout across your organization. Critical to this is the feedback of users. Promote the solution and provide training if needed Although social computing is viral, you may find that you need to offer some training. Do not be shy of this, but try to integrate the training within the solution, using video, audio, or hands-on-labs using the Silverlight player. Manage expectations Make sure that your ser understand what you are going to give them and when. You must show that this is based on their requirements and pilot feedback.Key Message It is essential to plan your social computing roll-out Presenter Notes Invest adequate resources This means people, hardware, and time; all of which cost money. Users will expect the same or better response than the social networks they use at home. Any less than this will be a major issue. Have champions to help you with roll-out This means that you must have stakeholder champions who lead the organization and are committed to social computing benefits. It also means that you should have expertise in the office to champion the use of social computing. Think about adoption strategies early in the project A successful roll-out is based on identifying what solutions users will adopt. Do not assume that if you build it then users will use it; you must identify what functionality or capabilities will ensure adoption in your organization. Focus on usefulness, usability, and design in your solution To encourage adoption, you need to check for these three elements. If a solution is not useful – as opposed to entertaining – it will not have a long term future. Make sure that your users can easily understand how the solution works. Social computing is essentially viral, so if something is difficult then it will probably not succeed as a social initiative. Have consistency of design – your social initiatives should adhere to a consistent social brand, as they would to a corporate brand. Make sure your solution is compatible with existing systems Start with pilots, learn from these, and implement improvements based on feedback We are all very aware of the functional and fit of IT systems such as e-mail and accounts, but we are less certain of the place of social computing in the workplace. Make sure of your design and pilot implementation before you consider rollout across your organization. Critical to this is the feedback of users. Promote the solution and provide training if needed Although social computing is viral, you may find that you need to offer some training. Do not be shy of this, but try to integrate the training within the solution, using video, audio, or hands-on-labs using the Silverlight player. Manage expectations Make sure that your ser understand what you are going to give them and when. You must show that this is based on their requirements and pilot feedback.

27. When to Focus on Adoption Key Message Adoption is key to a successful social computing solution. You should maintain a focus on adoption throughout the solution lifecycle. Presenter Notes The basic steps of a social initiative implementation is concept, design, plan, pilot, evaluate, launch, and monitor. You must ensure that you focus on adoption at all points during this. In the initial three phases you need to ensure that you have established the business value and metrics by which you can measure success. It is hard to establish an ROI methodology for software applications, but this is even more pronounced with social computing – how valuable are water-cooler conversations? Presenter Guidance Key Message Adoption is key to a successful social computing solution. You should maintain a focus on adoption throughout the solution lifecycle. Presenter Notes The basic steps of a social initiative implementation is concept, design, plan, pilot, evaluate, launch, and monitor. You must ensure that you focus on adoption at all points during this. In the initial three phases you need to ensure that you have established the business value and metrics by which you can measure success. It is hard to establish an ROI methodology for software applications, but this is even more pronounced with social computing – how valuable are water-cooler conversations? Presenter Guidance

28. Cultural Challenges Fear by management over loss of control Fear by employees over loss of personal value Confusion over the business impact of new social tools Hesitant about change and breaking away from existing conventions Key Message Social computing can bring about a cultural change for your organization, for which you must plan. Presenter Notes Present from the slide Presenter Guidance You may wish to turn this into a discussion slide, so that your users can outline any possible fears in the organization. *** Make sure that you know your audience, as a discussion on the topic of culture change can be divisive. ***Key Message Social computing can bring about a cultural change for your organization, for which you must plan. Presenter Notes Present from the slide Presenter Guidance You may wish to turn this into a discussion slide, so that your users can outline any possible fears in the organization. *** Make sure that you know your audience, as a discussion on the topic of culture change can be divisive. ***

29. Post-Launch Adoption Strategies Encourage acceptance through viral growth Train where appropriate Advertise the social computing roll-out Encourage and respond to feedback Sponsorship and approval from management Incorporate into employee related business processes – mentoring, skills validation Leverage new media Integrate social computing capabilities business processes Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Encourage acceptance through viral growth Viral marketing campaign used with emails sent to teams, communities of practice, etc Subsequent adoption driven by team and community leaders Train where appropriate Incorporate into new-hire orientation about "Setting up your profile Embed use into training exercises Advertise the social computing roll-out Advertised on Provide FAQ posters around different buildings/locations many of the EA internal portal sites through banner ads or direct link to profiles Sponsorship and approval from management Senior executive send out communication to everyone within the company explaining the new solutions and why its important Encourage and respond to feedback Use the surveys/feedback and really improve the system to expectations User surveys used to drive initial requirements and directions Provide regular improvements so there is always something new to try Major releases have been about 1 per quarter and minor releases more frequently Leverage new media Launch and feature videos Integrate social computing capabilities business processes Have blog discussions seeded throughoutKey Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Encourage acceptance through viral growth Viral marketing campaign used with emails sent to teams, communities of practice, etc Subsequent adoption driven by team and community leaders Train where appropriate Incorporate into new-hire orientation about "Setting up your profile Embed use into training exercises Advertise the social computing roll-out Advertised on Provide FAQ posters around different buildings/locations many of the EA internal portal sites through banner ads or direct link to profiles Sponsorship and approval from management Senior executive send out communication to everyone within the company explaining the new solutions and why its important Encourage and respond to feedback Use the surveys/feedback and really improve the system to expectations User surveys used to drive initial requirements and directions Provide regular improvements so there is always something new to try Major releases have been about 1 per quarter and minor releases more frequently Leverage new media Launch and feature videos Integrate social computing capabilities business processes Have blog discussions seeded throughout

30. Commonly Asked Questions Common Questions How do you measure “success” What is the magic number? How often should you roll out new features? How many “experts” should you enlist? What’s the process for how you make the policy decisions?      Real-world Answers Track monthly metrics: visits to site; number of content reads; number of searches; profiles completed; content added Ultimately everyone should strive for 100% – many factors drive the magic number including size of company, geographic dispersion, age, culture, etc Minimally every quarter during the first couple of years to adapt and meet needs Two for every community of practice created; a steering committee of 3 to 7 for the overall solution or target evangelists by geography and workforce Small steering committee Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

31. Technical Planning Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

32. Hardware and Software Platforms 64-bit Servers only! Enabling 2010 features will require more power! Dedicate SQL power to Logging DB and Web Analytics Recommended Hardware Requirements: WFE and Apps Servers - Dual processor, 8 GB RAM SQL Server - Quad Core, 16 GB RAM Recommended Software Requirements Client – IE7 (IE8 preferred) / Fire Fox 3.5/ Safari for Mac browsers 64-bit Windows Server 2008 (or 2008 R2) 64-bit SQL Server 2008 R2, 64-bit SQL Server 2008 or 64-bit SQL Key Message Presenter Notes Hardware requirements The requirements in the following table apply to single server with built-in database installations and server farm installations that include a single server or multiple servers in the farm. Component Minimum requirement Processor 64-bit, four-core, 2.5 GHz minimum per core RAM 4 GB for developer or evaluation use 8 GB for single server and multiple server farm installation for production use Hard disk 80 GB for installation For production use, you need additional free disk space for day-to-day operations. Add twice as much free space as you have RAM for production environments. Software requirements The requirements in the following tables apply to stand-alone installations and server farm installations that include a single server and multiple servers in the farm. The Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool — which you access from the SharePoint Server 2010 Start page — can assist you in the installation of the software prerequisites for SharePoint Server 2010. Ensure that you have an Internet connection, because some of these prerequisites are installed from the Internet. Environment Minimum requirement Database server in a farm One of the following: The 64-bit edition of Microsoft SQL Server 2005 with Service Pack 3 (SP3) with Cumulative update package 3 for SQL Server 2005 Service Pack 3 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=165748). The 64-bit edition of Microsoft SQL Server 2008 with Service Pack 1 (SP1) and Cumulative Update 2 with Cumulative update package 2 for SQL Server 2008 Service Pack 1 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=165962). This cumulative update consists of two parts; ensure that you download both files. When you install Microsoft SQL Server 2008 SP1 on Windows Server 2008 R2, you might receive a compatibility warning. You can disregard this warning and continue with your installation. Single server with built-in database The 64-bit edition of Windows Server 2008 Standard with SP2. If you are running Windows Server 2008 without SP2, the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool installs Windows Server 2008 SP2 automatically. Note: You must download an update for Windows Server 2008 before you run Setup, or Setup will not run. For Windows Server 2008 with SP2, see FIX: A hotfix that provides a method to support the token authentication without transport security or message encryption in WCF is available for the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=160770). For Windows Server 2008 R2, see FIX: A hotfix that provides a method to support the token authentication without transport security or message encryption in WCF is available for the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=166231). Web Server (IIS) role Application Server role Microsoft .NET Framework version 3.5 SP1 SQL Server 2008 Express and SQL Server 2008 R2 Express with SP1 Microsoft "Geneva" Framework Microsoft Sync Framework Runtime v1.0 (x64) Microsoft Filter Pack 2.0 Microsoft Chart Controls for the Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3 Note: On Windows Server 2008 with SP2, the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool cannot install Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3 if Windows PowerShell 1.0 is on the computer. You must uninstall Windows PowerShell 1.0 before the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool can install Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3. SQL Server 2008 Native Client Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services ADOMD.NET ADO.NET Data Services v1.5 CTP2 Front-end Web servers and application servers in a farm The 64-bit edition of Windows Server 2008 Standard with SP2. If you are running Windows Server 2008 with SP1, the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool installs Windows Server 2008 SP2 automatically. Note: You must download an update for Windows Server 2008 before you run Setup, or Setup will not run. For Windows Server 2008 with SP2, see FIX: A hotfix that provides a method to support the token authentication without transport security or message encryption in WCF is available for the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=160770). For Windows Server 2008 R2, see FIX: A hotfix that provides a method to support the token authentication without transport security or message encryption in WCF is available for the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=166231). The Beta version of the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool does not install these updates. Web Server (IIS) role Application Server role Microsoft .NET Framework version 3.5 SP1 Microsoft "Geneva" Framework Microsoft Sync Framework Runtime v1.0 (x64) Microsoft Filter Pack 2.0 Microsoft Chart Controls for the Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3 Note: On Windows Server 2008 with SP2, the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool cannot install Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3 if Windows PowerShell 1.0 is on the computer. You must uninstall Windows PowerShell 1.0 before the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool can install Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3. SQL Server 2008 Native Client Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services ADOMD.NET ADO.NET Data Services v1.5 CTP2 Client computer A supported browser.   Presenter Guidance Check current specification requirements at, http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc262485(office.14).aspx Key Message Presenter Notes Hardware requirements The requirements in the following table apply to single server with built-in database installations and server farm installations that include a single server or multiple servers in the farm. Component Minimum requirement Processor 64-bit, four-core, 2.5 GHz minimum per core RAM 4 GB for developer or evaluation use 8 GB for single server and multiple server farm installation for production use Hard disk 80 GB for installation For production use, you need additional free disk space for day-to-day operations. Add twice as much free space as you have RAM for production environments. Software requirements The requirements in the following tables apply to stand-alone installations and server farm installations that include a single server and multiple servers in the farm. The Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool — which you access from the SharePoint Server 2010 Start page — can assist you in the installation of the software prerequisites for SharePoint Server 2010. Ensure that you have an Internet connection, because some of these prerequisites are installed from the Internet. Environment Minimum requirement Database server in a farm One of the following: The 64-bit edition of Microsoft SQL Server 2005 with Service Pack 3 (SP3) with Cumulative update package 3 for SQL Server 2005 Service Pack 3 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=165748). The 64-bit edition of Microsoft SQL Server 2008 with Service Pack 1 (SP1) and Cumulative Update 2 with Cumulative update package 2 for SQL Server 2008 Service Pack 1 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=165962). This cumulative update consists of two parts; ensure that you download both files. When you install Microsoft SQL Server 2008 SP1 on Windows Server 2008 R2, you might receive a compatibility warning. You can disregard this warning and continue with your installation. Single server with built-in database The 64-bit edition of Windows Server 2008 Standard with SP2. If you are running Windows Server 2008 without SP2, the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool installs Windows Server 2008 SP2 automatically. Note: You must download an update for Windows Server 2008 before you run Setup, or Setup will not run. For Windows Server 2008 with SP2, see FIX: A hotfix that provides a method to support the token authentication without transport security or message encryption in WCF is available for the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=160770). For Windows Server 2008 R2, see FIX: A hotfix that provides a method to support the token authentication without transport security or message encryption in WCF is available for the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=166231). Web Server (IIS) role Application Server role Microsoft .NET Framework version 3.5 SP1 SQL Server 2008 Express and SQL Server 2008 R2 Express with SP1 Microsoft "Geneva" Framework Microsoft Sync Framework Runtime v1.0 (x64) Microsoft Filter Pack 2.0 Microsoft Chart Controls for the Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3 Note: On Windows Server 2008 with SP2, the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool cannot install Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3 if Windows PowerShell 1.0 is on the computer. You must uninstall Windows PowerShell 1.0 before the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool can install Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3. SQL Server 2008 Native Client Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services ADOMD.NET ADO.NET Data Services v1.5 CTP2 Front-end Web servers and application servers in a farm The 64-bit edition of Windows Server 2008 Standard with SP2. If you are running Windows Server 2008 with SP1, the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool installs Windows Server 2008 SP2 automatically. Note: You must download an update for Windows Server 2008 before you run Setup, or Setup will not run. For Windows Server 2008 with SP2, see FIX: A hotfix that provides a method to support the token authentication without transport security or message encryption in WCF is available for the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=160770). For Windows Server 2008 R2, see FIX: A hotfix that provides a method to support the token authentication without transport security or message encryption in WCF is available for the .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=166231). The Beta version of the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool does not install these updates. Web Server (IIS) role Application Server role Microsoft .NET Framework version 3.5 SP1 Microsoft "Geneva" Framework Microsoft Sync Framework Runtime v1.0 (x64) Microsoft Filter Pack 2.0 Microsoft Chart Controls for the Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3 Note: On Windows Server 2008 with SP2, the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool cannot install Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3 if Windows PowerShell 1.0 is on the computer. You must uninstall Windows PowerShell 1.0 before the Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Products Preparation Tool can install Windows PowerShell 2.0 CTP3. SQL Server 2008 Native Client Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services ADOMD.NET ADO.NET Data Services v1.5 CTP2 Client computer A supported browser.   Presenter Guidance Check current specification requirements at, http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc262485(office.14).aspx

33. Recommendations for IT Phased approach – don’t overwhelm the users Implement improvements/new features regularly Make governance policies easy to find Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

34. Profile Service Application Architecture Key Message Presenter Notes The User Profile Service is a shared service in SharePoint Server 2010 that enables the creation and distribution of profiles across multiple sites and farms. The User Profile Service provides a central location for configuring and managing the following personalization settings: User profile properties Audiences Profile synchronization settings Organization browsing and management settings My Site settings Tags are held in their own database, as is the user profile information. This takes pressure of the database management, that previously existed in the MOSS 2007 SSP database. The Term Store is part of the Managed Metadata Profile Service application and also has its own database. This synchronization can be a load on SQL Server, so you should ensure that there are multiple spindles to handle database and log files and keep those on separate volumes and spindles. You should also have high sped connections between the SharePoint server and other profile repositories, especially if you are moving large amounts of user information. BCS can still bring in information for profiles, but it cannot export to other systems. LDAP and BCS will only be able to bring in user information, while it is possible to bring in group information from other sources, through FIM. Information from the Profile database is then synchronized with the individual Content databases that correspond to Web Applications that consume from the Profile Service Application. SharePoint 2010 ships Forefront Identity Manager (FIM), which controls the ability to synchronize with other identity management services, such as directory services. This information is held in the Synchronization database. When the correct image identity is build this is passed to the Profile database, where it is used. From there is can be used by different Web application in SharePoint 2010. Out of the box, SharePoint 2010 will ship connectors to FIM for IBM, Novell, Sun, Active directory and LDAP. For information on FIM download http://download.microsoft.com/download/3/2/A/32A7B77A-7D3A-4D24-ACE7-5AA3A908B95E/Understanding%20FIM%202010.docx Key Message Presenter Notes The User Profile Service is a shared service in SharePoint Server 2010 that enables the creation and distribution of profiles across multiple sites and farms. The User Profile Service provides a central location for configuring and managing the following personalization settings: User profile properties Audiences Profile synchronization settings Organization browsing and management settings My Site settings Tags are held in their own database, as is the user profile information. This takes pressure of the database management, that previously existed in the MOSS 2007 SSP database. The Term Store is part of the Managed Metadata Profile Service application and also has its own database. This synchronization can be a load on SQL Server, so you should ensure that there are multiple spindles to handle database and log files and keep those on separate volumes and spindles. You should also have high sped connections between the SharePoint server and other profile repositories, especially if you are moving large amounts of user information. BCS can still bring in information for profiles, but it cannot export to other systems. LDAP and BCS will only be able to bring in user information, while it is possible to bring in group information from other sources, through FIM. Information from the Profile database is then synchronized with the individual Content databases that correspond to Web Applications that consume from the Profile Service Application. SharePoint 2010 ships Forefront Identity Manager (FIM), which controls the ability to synchronize with other identity management services, such as directory services. This information is held in the Synchronization database. When the correct image identity is build this is passed to the Profile database, where it is used. From there is can be used by different Web application in SharePoint 2010. Out of the box, SharePoint 2010 will ship connectors to FIM for IBM, Novell, Sun, Active directory and LDAP. For information on FIM download http://download.microsoft.com/download/3/2/A/32A7B77A-7D3A-4D24-ACE7-5AA3A908B95E/Understanding%20FIM%202010.docx

35. User Profiles Key Message Presenter Notes Before you can personalize the sites and content within an organization, you have to plan user profiles. Information about users can come from directory services such as AD DS. It can also come from line-of-business applications, such as SAP. The User Profile Service enables you to bring all of the properties from these diverse content sources together to create unified and consistent user profiles across an organization. The properties and content from these sources are stored in user profiles that are managed by the User Profile Service. User profiles identify connections among users such as common managers, workgroups, group membership, and sites. User profiles also contain information about areas that a user is interested in and help users locate subject matter experts for a particular area. This information enables users to find one another by using the People Search feature. In this manner, the relationships among users in an organization can be used to encourage more efficient collaboration with colleagues and across teams. User profiles are more than merely groupings of imported and custom properties about users in an organization. The properties are also used to display information about the relationships of each user to other users in an organization. Profile subtypes can be used to provide more detailed information about a user. For example, you can assign a subtype to the employee property that categorizes a user as either an intern or a full-time employee. Additionally, user profiles and user profile properties can be used to implement personalization features, such as audiences, and the policies that define how information about users is displayed and shared. Every site that uses the same User Profile Service application receives the same set of properties from the user profile store and displays them in the site's user information list. This also includes a list of documents that are shared by each user. Key Message Presenter Notes Before you can personalize the sites and content within an organization, you have to plan user profiles. Information about users can come from directory services such as AD DS. It can also come from line-of-business applications, such as SAP. The User Profile Service enables you to bring all of the properties from these diverse content sources together to create unified and consistent user profiles across an organization. The properties and content from these sources are stored in user profiles that are managed by the User Profile Service. User profiles identify connections among users such as common managers, workgroups, group membership, and sites. User profiles also contain information about areas that a user is interested in and help users locate subject matter experts for a particular area. This information enables users to find one another by using the People Search feature. In this manner, the relationships among users in an organization can be used to encourage more efficient collaboration with colleagues and across teams. User profiles are more than merely groupings of imported and custom properties about users in an organization. The properties are also used to display information about the relationships of each user to other users in an organization. Profile subtypes can be used to provide more detailed information about a user. For example, you can assign a subtype to the employee property that categorizes a user as either an intern or a full-time employee. Additionally, user profiles and user profile properties can be used to implement personalization features, such as audiences, and the policies that define how information about users is displayed and shared. Every site that uses the same User Profile Service application receives the same set of properties from the user profile store and displays them in the site's user information list. This also includes a list of documents that are shared by each user.

36. User Profile Properties Key Message Presenter Notes The User Profile service is a service application in SharePoint Server that can be consumed across multiple sites and farms. The User Profile service provides a central location for configuring and managing the following personalization settings: User profile properties Audiences Profile synchronization settings Organization browsing and management settings My Site settings When planning user profiles, you have to determine the information about users that is needed. This information will be stored in user profile properties and profile property subtypes. Everyone can view information about a user from the profile page of the My Site Host Web application. The privacy and policy settings in an organization govern the type of profile information that a user can view. The owner of the information sets the privacy settings while the organization sets policy settings. When you plan for user profiles, you should consider several factors: What are the existing and planned directory services? These services will form the foundation for user profiles. Determine the properties that you will use for your core user profiles based on those that are relevant across the organization (or across the User Profile Service in an organization that has multiple sets of User Profile Service applications). Properties that can be used when finding users, creating audiences to use when targeting content, and establishing relationships between colleagues and workgroups are important. Start by reviewing the list of properties in directory services, followed by the default properties provided by SharePoint Server 2010 and modify that list according to these considerations. What areas of your organization require different user profile subtypes? For example, do you can create user profile subtypes for full-time employees, part-time employees, and interns? Which line-of-business applications that you use have information about users? Which properties can be mapped to the properties of directory services? Based on the business intelligence planning, what other properties of business applications that are not related to users might be useful for users in the organization? You can use these properties in personalized Web Parts to target business data based on audiences. How many user records are you planning to import from all sources, and how often do you want to synchronize these records between the SharePoint profile store and these sources? The frequency of scheduled synchronization will depend on the number of records, how heavily you are using personalization features, and when you can schedule synchronizations to have the least effect on performance and availability. Let the IT administrators know this information so they can include it in their deployment planning. Which user profile properties at the site level do you expect? In some organizations, this might be dictated centrally. At other organizations, this decision might be left to the discretion of each site collection administrator. Key Message Presenter Notes The User Profile service is a service application in SharePoint Server that can be consumed across multiple sites and farms. The User Profile service provides a central location for configuring and managing the following personalization settings: User profile properties Audiences Profile synchronization settings Organization browsing and management settings My Site settings When planning user profiles, you have to determine the information about users that is needed. This information will be stored in user profile properties and profile property subtypes. Everyone can view information about a user from the profile page of the My Site Host Web application. The privacy and policy settings in an organization govern the type of profile information that a user can view. The owner of the information sets the privacy settings while the organization sets policy settings. When you plan for user profiles, you should consider several factors: What are the existing and planned directory services? These services will form the foundation for user profiles. Determine the properties that you will use for your core user profiles based on those that are relevant across the organization (or across the User Profile Service in an organization that has multiple sets of User Profile Service applications). Properties that can be used when finding users, creating audiences to use when targeting content, and establishing relationships between colleagues and workgroups are important. Start by reviewing the list of properties in directory services, followed by the default properties provided by SharePoint Server 2010 and modify that list according to these considerations. What areas of your organization require different user profile subtypes? For example, do you can create user profile subtypes for full-time employees, part-time employees, and interns? Which line-of-business applications that you use have information about users? Which properties can be mapped to the properties of directory services? Based on the business intelligence planning, what other properties of business applications that are not related to users might be useful for users in the organization? You can use these properties in personalized Web Parts to target business data based on audiences. How many user records are you planning to import from all sources, and how often do you want to synchronize these records between the SharePoint profile store and these sources? The frequency of scheduled synchronization will depend on the number of records, how heavily you are using personalization features, and when you can schedule synchronizations to have the least effect on performance and availability. Let the IT administrators know this information so they can include it in their deployment planning. Which user profile properties at the site level do you expect? In some organizations, this might be dictated centrally. At other organizations, this decision might be left to the discretion of each site collection administrator.

37. Profile Properties Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Default profile properties SharePoint Server 2010 provides a set of default properties. You will want to review these properties and the policies that apply to them before you decide which changes to make, which properties to keep or remove, and which additional properties to create. Additional profile properties The default user profile properties and the properties that are imported from connections to directory services and business applications can be supplemented with additional properties that track key information that is not available from these sources. These properties can, for example, be integers, strings, term sets, and so on. For example, you can create a profile property that is named “favorite hobby” and associate it with a term set named “hobbies” from the Managed Metadata Service. When updating their profiles, users can then select one of the terms in the “hobbies” term set as the value for their favorite hobby. For more information about term sets and the Managed Metadata Service, see Managed metadata overview (SharePoint Server 2010). You should plan to add properties at the level of the User Profile Service or site collection depending on the business needs that you identified in earlier planning. Key business needs can often be addressed by creating new properties that associate users with important business processes. Search can then use these properties to find users, or personalization features can use the properties to target content to users. Properties do not have to be visible in public profiles or My Site Web sites, and properties can be useful for search or personalization without being displayed in public profiles or My Site Web sites. To limit the scope of planning, focus on adding properties that enable key business needs or scenarios for each site collection. If a relevant property does not address specific scenarios, wait until a specific need is identified during regular operations instead of planning to add the property during initial deployment. It is possible that you might not have to add many new properties at all. However, it is worth considering in case there are obvious needs. Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Default profile properties SharePoint Server 2010 provides a set of default properties. You will want to review these properties and the policies that apply to them before you decide which changes to make, which properties to keep or remove, and which additional properties to create. Additional profile properties The default user profile properties and the properties that are imported from connections to directory services and business applications can be supplemented with additional properties that track key information that is not available from these sources. These properties can, for example, be integers, strings, term sets, and so on. For example, you can create a profile property that is named “favorite hobby” and associate it with a term set named “hobbies” from the Managed Metadata Service. When updating their profiles, users can then select one of the terms in the “hobbies” term set as the value for their favorite hobby. For more information about term sets and the Managed Metadata Service, see Managed metadata overview (SharePoint Server 2010). You should plan to add properties at the level of the User Profile Service or site collection depending on the business needs that you identified in earlier planning. Key business needs can often be addressed by creating new properties that associate users with important business processes. Search can then use these properties to find users, or personalization features can use the properties to target content to users. Properties do not have to be visible in public profiles or My Site Web sites, and properties can be useful for search or personalization without being displayed in public profiles or My Site Web sites. To limit the scope of planning, focus on adding properties that enable key business needs or scenarios for each site collection. If a relevant property does not address specific scenarios, wait until a specific need is identified during regular operations instead of planning to add the property during initial deployment. It is possible that you might not have to add many new properties at all. However, it is worth considering in case there are obvious needs.

38. Policies for User Profiles Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Policies are sets of rules that administrators of the User Profile service assign to users or groups of users. These rules enable administrators to specify both the site content that users can see and how users can interact with that content. To start planning, assess the current visibility of the information about users in the organization. Some information about individual users should remain private. Other information can and should be shared freely with other users to encourage collaboration. Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 provides a set of configurable policies to help administrators make the appropriate information available to meet the needs of the organization. Organizations can also create and deploy custom policy features to meet specific needs. You should review collaboration needs across the organization before you develop a plan for implementing the best mix of policies. Information architecture and site hierarchy play an important role in decisions about which policies to use. You should also consider who is using sites. For example, a large organization that has a central portal site with a large number of viewers but very few contributors might have less need to share information than a departmental site where many people can contribute content. Many of these issues are handled as part of security planning, but privacy policies and security considerations are sufficiently related that it is a good idea to consider them together. Policies that are less restrictive allow more users to view public profiles more frequently, which affects how often you must update user profiles and compile audiences. In organizations that have many users, frequent updating could affect performance and capacity planning. User Profile Service administrators should share policy decisions with IT professionals in the organization. Some policy-related issues that could affect IT planning include the following: the source of the user profile information the expected frequency of updating user profile information the expected frequency of compiling audiences the effect on performance and capacity of servers that are running Profile Services. Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Policies are sets of rules that administrators of the User Profile service assign to users or groups of users. These rules enable administrators to specify both the site content that users can see and how users can interact with that content. To start planning, assess the current visibility of the information about users in the organization. Some information about individual users should remain private. Other information can and should be shared freely with other users to encourage collaboration. Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 provides a set of configurable policies to help administrators make the appropriate information available to meet the needs of the organization. Organizations can also create and deploy custom policy features to meet specific needs. You should review collaboration needs across the organization before you develop a plan for implementing the best mix of policies. Information architecture and site hierarchy play an important role in decisions about which policies to use. You should also consider who is using sites. For example, a large organization that has a central portal site with a large number of viewers but very few contributors might have less need to share information than a departmental site where many people can contribute content. Many of these issues are handled as part of security planning, but privacy policies and security considerations are sufficiently related that it is a good idea to consider them together. Policies that are less restrictive allow more users to view public profiles more frequently, which affects how often you must update user profiles and compile audiences. In organizations that have many users, frequent updating could affect performance and capacity planning. User Profile Service administrators should share policy decisions with IT professionals in the organization. Some policy-related issues that could affect IT planning include the following: the source of the user profile information the expected frequency of updating user profile information the expected frequency of compiling audiences the effect on performance and capacity of servers that are running Profile Services.

39. Default Policies Enabled Required Optional Disabled User Override Replicable Everyone & User Override Key Message Presenter Notes Every personalization feature and property exposed in user profiles and personal sites has a recommended default policy that can be customized based on the needs of the organization. Each policy has two parts: the policy setting and the default visibility setting. Policy setting Some personalization features provide important information for key business processes in an organization, whereas other information might be inappropriate for sharing across an organization. Between these extremes is the information that should be shared among some users but not made available to everyone. In the latter case, you must create policies to address these specific situations. You should work with representatives from the business side of your organization to determine the appropriate features or properties. The policy settings are: Enabled The feature is visible to the administrator of the User Profile service and to users other than the User Profile Service administrator, depending on the default visibility setting. Required This property must contain information and the information is shared based on default access. Forms that contain these features or properties cannot be submitted until the required information is provided. For example, the Manager property is often mandatory so that it can be used to provide information for the Organization feature and audiences based on an organization's reporting hierarchy. Optional The property is created but its values might not be provided automatically. Each user decides whether to provide values for the property or leave the property empty. For example, the My Colleagues feature is optional. Instead of being blank, the full list of colleagues, which includes everyone in a user’s My Team list, is visible by default to users who have access. Users can decide to opt out by removing colleagues from the list, or expand the list by adding colleagues. Disabled The property or feature is visible only to the User Profile Service administrator. It does not appear in personalized sites or Web Parts, and it cannot be shared. User Override Properties that have the User Override option selected enable users to change the default visibility settings for those properties. With this option selected, each user can decide who can see the values they entered for the property. If this option is not selected, only administrators of the User Profile Service can change default access settings. Properties and features that have the Replicable option selected can be replicated to other SharePoint sites, but only if the default access policy is set to Everyone and the User Override option is not selected. Key Message Presenter Notes Every personalization feature and property exposed in user profiles and personal sites has a recommended default policy that can be customized based on the needs of the organization. Each policy has two parts: the policy setting and the default visibility setting. Policy setting Some personalization features provide important information for key business processes in an organization, whereas other information might be inappropriate for sharing across an organization. Between these extremes is the information that should be shared among some users but not made available to everyone. In the latter case, you must create policies to address these specific situations. You should work with representatives from the business side of your organization to determine the appropriate features or properties. The policy settings are: Enabled The feature is visible to the administrator of the User Profile service and to users other than the User Profile Service administrator, depending on the default visibility setting. Required This property must contain information and the information is shared based on default access. Forms that contain these features or properties cannot be submitted until the required information is provided. For example, the Manager property is often mandatory so that it can be used to provide information for the Organization feature and audiences based on an organization's reporting hierarchy. Optional The property is created but its values might not be provided automatically. Each user decides whether to provide values for the property or leave the property empty. For example, the My Colleagues feature is optional. Instead of being blank, the full list of colleagues, which includes everyone in a user’s My Team list, is visible by default to users who have access. Users can decide to opt out by removing colleagues from the list, or expand the list by adding colleagues. Disabled The property or feature is visible only to the User Profile Service administrator. It does not appear in personalized sites or Web Parts, and it cannot be shared. User Override Properties that have the User Override option selected enable users to change the default visibility settings for those properties. With this option selected, each user can decide who can see the values they entered for the property. If this option is not selected, only administrators of the User Profile Service can change default access settings. Properties and features that have the Replicable option selected can be replicated to other SharePoint sites, but only if the default access policy is set to Everyone and the User Override option is not selected.

40. User Profile Properties Planning The following questions can help you determine which policies are appropriate for your organization: Which properties should be mandatory?    Some properties — such as account name, preferred name, work telephone number, department, title, and work e-mail address — are mandatory by default and cannot be overridden or changed by users. In most organizations, these properties are key ways to enable collaboration and develop relationships across the organization. SharePoint Server 2010 also uses many of them to enable other features, such as colleagues and audiences. For more information, see Plan audiences. Which properties should be visible to everyone?    By default, most properties are visible to everyone, but sensitive information can be configured to have limited visibility. For example, a company that has many employees in the field might decide that mobile phone information is important for everyone to see. Other organizations might choose to keep all non-work telephone numbers private. Which properties can be changed by users?    Some properties can be made available without requiring that users provide information or allow a certain action to be performed. For example, some users might not want automatic population of colleague lists. Other users might want to change the default visibility setting for a property. When planning the policy setting for a property, consider the factors in the table. The following questions can help you determine which policies are appropriate for your organization: Which properties should be mandatory?    Some properties — such as account name, preferred name, work telephone number, department, title, and work e-mail address — are mandatory by default and cannot be overridden or changed by users. In most organizations, these properties are key ways to enable collaboration and develop relationships across the organization. SharePoint Server 2010 also uses many of them to enable other features, such as colleagues and audiences. For more information, see Plan audiences. Which properties should be visible to everyone?    By default, most properties are visible to everyone, but sensitive information can be configured to have limited visibility. For example, a company that has many employees in the field might decide that mobile phone information is important for everyone to see. Other organizations might choose to keep all non-work telephone numbers private. Which properties can be changed by users?    Some properties can be made available without requiring that users provide information or allow a certain action to be performed. For example, some users might not want automatic population of colleague lists. Other users might want to change the default visibility setting for a property. When planning the policy setting for a property, consider the factors in the table.

41. Default Visibility Settings Everyone My Colleagues My Team My Manager Only Me Key Message Presenter Notes Default visibility setting The visibility setting determines who can see information for a specific personalization feature. Available settings include the following: Everyone Every user who has viewer permissions to the site can see the relevant information. My Colleagues Every user in this user's My Colleagues list can see the information for this user. My Team Every colleague in the user's immediate team, a subset of the My Colleagues list, can see the information. My Manager Only the user and the user's immediate manager can see the information. Only Me Only the user and the administrator of the User Profile service can see the information. Key Message Presenter Notes Default visibility setting The visibility setting determines who can see information for a specific personalization feature. Available settings include the following: Everyone Every user who has viewer permissions to the site can see the relevant information. My Colleagues Every user in this user's My Colleagues list can see the information for this user. My Team Every colleague in the user's immediate team, a subset of the My Colleagues list, can see the information. My Manager Only the user and the user's immediate manager can see the information. Only Me Only the user and the administrator of the User Profile service can see the information.

42. Default Visibility Settings Planning Key Message Presenter Notes When you plan the default visibility settings for an organization’s policies, consider the factors in the table. Presenter Guidance Present from the slideKey Message Presenter Notes When you plan the default visibility settings for an organization’s policies, consider the factors in the table. Presenter Guidance Present from the slide

43. Memberships and Colleagues Memberships Colleagues Key Message Presenter Notes Memberships and colleagues Relationships among different users in an organization are displayed in the public profile page for each user. Administrators of the User Profile Service can also see information about these relationships from the user profiles that are stored in the profile store. This relationship information includes the following information: site memberships (a global view of all memberships for each user) distribution list memberships colleagues Memberships In SharePoint Server 2010, a user’s profile contains a list of all memberships and distribution lists to which a user belongs. Information in a distribution list is synchronized with the directory service, LDAP service, or line-of-business applications during profile synchronization. The User Profile to SharePoint Full Sync synchronizes the timer job Membership information. By default this timer job will add site memberships to a user profile. User profiles contain information about users’ site memberships only if they belong to the default membership group for a site. Colleagues Colleagues can include each user's immediate associates — which includes one's manager, peers, and direct reports. Organizations that have key relationships that cross groups of users, managers or other users might want to add people to the Colleagues lists for certain groups. You can also configure Outlook to export colleague suggestions to users in SharePoint Server. Key Message Presenter Notes Memberships and colleagues Relationships among different users in an organization are displayed in the public profile page for each user. Administrators of the User Profile Service can also see information about these relationships from the user profiles that are stored in the profile store. This relationship information includes the following information: site memberships (a global view of all memberships for each user) distribution list memberships colleagues Memberships In SharePoint Server 2010, a user’s profile contains a list of all memberships and distribution lists to which a user belongs. Information in a distribution list is synchronized with the directory service, LDAP service, or line-of-business applications during profile synchronization. The User Profile to SharePoint Full Sync synchronizes the timer job Membership information. By default this timer job will add site memberships to a user profile. User profiles contain information about users’ site memberships only if they belong to the default membership group for a site. Colleagues Colleagues can include each user's immediate associates — which includes one's manager, peers, and direct reports. Organizations that have key relationships that cross groups of users, managers or other users might want to add people to the Colleagues lists for certain groups. You can also configure Outlook to export colleague suggestions to users in SharePoint Server.

44. Locating People and Expertise Key Message Presenter Notes SharePoint Server 2010 enables users to find other users based on their expertise and role in an organization. Farm administrators can enable the following methods of finding people: People search results contain links to the public profiles of each user and links to contact them by e-mail or messaging programs. Expertise finding used with people search and expertise tagging to help users locate people within an organization who have identified themselves as having significant experience with a particular subject. If e-mail analysis is enabled, colleague suggestions are imported from Outlook if using Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 e-mail. If Microsoft Outlook 2010 is used, colleagues, and keywords are analyzed and suggestions are made to the user based on this analysis. Although e-mail analysis can be enabled in Outlook, users can opt out of this feature if they want. When planning for users, you might want to consider supplementing the default people search scope and Search Center tab with customized search scopes and tabs for more specific groups of users. User Profile Service administrators will want to consult the information architecture and site hierarchy to identify key business concepts that might relate to specific groups of users who might be sought out by users across sites. Then, User Profile Service administrators can work with the Search Service administrator to develop search scopes and people search tabs for those specific groups. They can also use their knowledge of the user profiles they manage to identify other useful groups of users and create additional specific search scopes and search tabs for those groups. Site collection administrators can create site-level search scopes for users who are members of their site collection. People search planning also feeds back into user profile planning. Initial planning might reveal individuals or groups of users whom you want to make it easier to find, but the right properties might not exist to allow for those users to be found easily. Key Message Presenter Notes SharePoint Server 2010 enables users to find other users based on their expertise and role in an organization. Farm administrators can enable the following methods of finding people: People search results contain links to the public profiles of each user and links to contact them by e-mail or messaging programs. Expertise finding used with people search and expertise tagging to help users locate people within an organization who have identified themselves as having significant experience with a particular subject. If e-mail analysis is enabled, colleague suggestions are imported from Outlook if using Microsoft Office Outlook 2007 e-mail. If Microsoft Outlook 2010 is used, colleagues, and keywords are analyzed and suggestions are made to the user based on this analysis. Although e-mail analysis can be enabled in Outlook, users can opt out of this feature if they want.

45. Synchronizing Profiles Key Message Presenter Notes Profile Synchronization in SharePoint Server 2010 enables an administrator of an instance of the User Profile service to synchronize user and group profile information that is stored in the SharePoint Server 2010 profile store with profile information that is stored in directory services and business systems across the enterprise. Profile synchronization can occur when profile information has changed in the SharePoint Server 2010 profile store or when profile information has changed in the directory service or business system. After you configure Profile Synchronization, changes to either store are detected. Import or export occurs depending on the import/export settings for a particular user profile property. The process of planning user profiles includes the following: identifying the directory services and line-of-business applications with which you want to synchronize profile information planning connections to those applications mapping the properties that you want to synchronize determining a schedule for regular synchronization A key planning principle is consistency across content sources for all users in an organization. The User Profile Service enables you to collect information about users in an organization across directory services and business applications so that consistent and timely information is always available. Information about users is synchronized across the deployment to all site collections that use the same User Profile Service application. This information can also be used by personalization features to increase the value of collaboration and relationships in an organization. When planning synchronization of user profiles, you should include the following tasks: Start with the default properties of user profiles in SharePoint Server 2010. Identify connections to directory services that will provide supplemental information for properties of user profiles. Consider additional business data that enables you to connect users to line-of-business applications. SharePoint Server 2010 includes the ability to do a two-way sync of user profile properties between SharePoint Server 2010 and directory services. The User Profile Service maintains the connections with the relevant business applications and updates the properties of user profiles during regularly scheduled synchronizations of all relevant content sources. Key Message Presenter Notes Profile Synchronization in SharePoint Server 2010 enables an administrator of an instance of the User Profile service to synchronize user and group profile information that is stored in the SharePoint Server 2010 profile store with profile information that is stored in directory services and business systems across the enterprise. Profile synchronization can occur when profile information has changed in the SharePoint Server 2010 profile store or when profile information has changed in the directory service or business system. After you configure Profile Synchronization, changes to either store are detected. Import or export occurs depending on the import/export settings for a particular user profile property. The process of planning user profiles includes the following: identifying the directory services and line-of-business applications with which you want to synchronize profile information planning connections to those applications mapping the properties that you want to synchronize determining a schedule for regular synchronization A key planning principle is consistency across content sources for all users in an organization. The User Profile Service enables you to collect information about users in an organization across directory services and business applications so that consistent and timely information is always available. Information about users is synchronized across the deployment to all site collections that use the same User Profile Service application. This information can also be used by personalization features to increase the value of collaboration and relationships in an organization. When planning synchronization of user profiles, you should include the following tasks: Start with the default properties of user profiles in SharePoint Server 2010. Identify connections to directory services that will provide supplemental information for properties of user profiles. Consider additional business data that enables you to connect users to line-of-business applications. SharePoint Server 2010 includes the ability to do a two-way sync of user profile properties between SharePoint Server 2010 and directory services. The User Profile Service maintains the connections with the relevant business applications and updates the properties of user profiles during regularly scheduled synchronizations of all relevant content sources.

46. Policies for people features Expected update frequency Audience compilation Performance and capacity of servers that are running Profile Services. Security Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Customer-facing sites will have completely different policy considerations compared to collaboration sites. Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Customer-facing sites will have completely different policy considerations compared to collaboration sites.

47. Social Feedback Administration User Profile Service application administrators Can be deleted Profile ID or URL Date Range Specific Tag or note Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Social feedback is administered through the User Profile Service application. You can search by user profile or the URL of a site. You can then: delete all tags or notes for a specific profile ID or URL delete all tags or notes for a particular date range delete a specific tag or note. All the bookmarks, notepad are held within the UPS application, the keywords are maintained in the Term Store, which is part of the enterprise managed metadata service application. So, removing social tags does not remove the terms from the term store. Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Social feedback is administered through the User Profile Service application. You can search by user profile or the URL of a site. You can then: delete all tags or notes for a specific profile ID or URL delete all tags or notes for a particular date range delete a specific tag or note. All the bookmarks, notepad are held within the UPS application, the keywords are maintained in the Term Store, which is part of the enterprise managed metadata service application. So, removing social tags does not remove the terms from the term store.

48. Security Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

49. Planning for Privacy You will need to proactively plan for privacy Key stakeholders are HR, Legal, IT and Business Drivers Top Issues for My Site deployment Picture usage – consent, company policy Activity feed Who follows me? (custom) Two-way consent (custom) Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

50. Planning for Scale Can be very large datasets Enterprise metadata generates tags -> Internet Scale Estimating the amount is not trivial We use a model Make estimate/assumptions Track usage and reapply Need to scale UP We are testing up to 600M rows at RTM Co-locate managed metadata, profile and search when possible Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

51. Planning for Privacy Social tagging will be culturally disruptive Need to plan Who can social tag/bookmark? Define an acceptable use policy What happens when the employee leaves? Security trimming of tags ON or OFF Pluggable architecture allows definition of rules and back ends Define how to handle non-SharePoint and external sites Only Indexed sites can be trimmed out-of-the-box Activity feed repercussions Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

52. Planning for Adoption Best Practices Start with a diverse employee advisory committee prior to deployment Seed the social network and Tag corpus Connect with HR, Legal, and Executive sponsors to ensure a smooth deployment Agree and Develop the workflow for handling concerns and escalations Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance Key Message Presenter Notes Presenter Guidance

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