A study of catalogers perception of cataloging quality past present
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 17

A Study of Catalogers’ Perception of Cataloging Quality, Past & Present PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 62 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

A Study of Catalogers’ Perception of Cataloging Quality, Past & Present. Karen Snow Ph.D. Candidate University of North Texas Cataloging Norms Interest Group – ALA Midwinter January 16, 2010.

Download Presentation

A Study of Catalogers’ Perception of Cataloging Quality, Past & Present

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


A study of catalogers perception of cataloging quality past present

A Study of Catalogers’ Perception of Cataloging Quality, Past & Present

Karen Snow

Ph.D. Candidate

University of North Texas

Cataloging Norms Interest Group – ALA Midwinter

January 16, 2010


A study of catalogers perception of cataloging quality past present

“Clearly the quality of catalogue records being added to bibliographic utilities and individual library catalogues is declining”

-- J. McRee (Mac) Elrod


A study of catalogers perception of cataloging quality past present

What is ‘Quality Cataloging’?


A study of catalogers perception of cataloging quality past present

“As with a person who cannot define art but knows it when he sees it, I cannot completely define a good cataloguing record, but I know it when I retrieve it”

-Levon Avdoyan


A study of catalogers perception of cataloging quality past present

“Quality is not immutable but is rather a standard of excellence that reflects the values of the individuals proclaiming it”

--Sarah Thomas


Charles a cutter late 19 th century

Charles A. Cutter (late 19th century)

  • Boston Athenaeum Catalog – inherited editorship in 1870

  • Problems:

    • Inconsistent cataloging practices

    • Lack of trained personnel

    • Speed

  • Solutions:

    • Standardize cataloging practice

    • Push for cooperative cataloging


Library of congress card distribution program 1901

Library of Congress Card Distribution Program (1901)

  • Established under Librarian of Congress Herbert Putnam

  • Print extra copies of LC cards and sell them at cost plus 10% (to cover printing costs)

  • Lead to establishment of LC as the leader in cataloging practice and rules

  • LC cataloging perceived to be highest in quality


Osborn s crisis in cataloging 1941

Osborn’s Crisis in Cataloging (1941)

  • A “crisis has been reached in cataloging history”

    • “Dignity of cataloging as an art” lost to obsession with rules

    • Distance between administrators and catalogers

  • Less rules, more cataloger’s judgment = better cataloging

  • Four dominant cataloging theories: Legalistic, Perfectionistic, Bibliographic, and Pragmatic


The rise of networks 1970s 1980s

The Rise of Networks (1970s & 1980s)

  • OCLC founded in 1967 & grew quickly during the 1970s

  • Luquire (1976) – quality must be sacrificed if OCLC copy accepted w/o changes – quality = local needs not met?

  • Sheila Intner (1989) – quality difference between OCLC and RLIN is overstated

  • Carol C. Davis (1989) – perception of low quality in OCLC database does not stand on solid evidence


Ruth hafter academic librarians cataloging networks 1986

Ruth Hafter – Academic Librarians & Cataloging Networks (1986)

  • Rise in interest in quality control parallels greater participation in cataloging networks

  • Greater dependence upon cataloging networks lead to more copy cataloging

  • More copy cataloging  less original cataloging & professional catalogers needed; more paraprofessionals hired

  • Deprofessionalization & marginalization of cataloging has lead to decrease in quality cataloging


Library of congress 1990s

Library of Congress (1990s)

  • Renewed efforts to tackle arrearages

  • Whole Book Cataloging Project – combined subject and descriptive cataloging divisions at LC

  • Cataloging Forum introduced in February 1990

  • “Cataloging Quality is…

    • accurate bibliographic information that meets the users’ needs and provides appropriate access in a timely fashion”


Dimensions of information quality

Dimensions of Information Quality

  • Southern California Online Users Group (SCOUG) (1990, via Tenopir): Consistency, coverage & scope, timeliness, accuracy/error rate, accessibility/ease of use, integration, output, documentation, customer support & training, and value-to-cost ratio ("11 main components that will help a professional searcher judge quality")

  • Fox, Levitin, & Redman (1994): accuracy, completeness, consistency, and currentness ("the most important dimensions of data quality")

  • Statistics Canada's Quality Assurance Framework (2002): Relevance, accuracy, timeliness, accessibility, interpretability, and coherence ("dimensions of information quality")

  • Bruce & Hillmann (2004): Completeness, accuracy, provenance, conformance to expectations, logical consistency & coherence, timeliness, and accessibility ("general characteristics of metadata quality")


Online catalogs what users librarians want oclc 2009

Online Catalogs: What Users & Librarians Want (OCLC, 2009)

  • Disconnect between users & librarians in regards to quality

  • Quality for users = more direct access to online content

  • Quality for librarians = less duplication of records

  • Users’ ideas of quality driven by their information needs & experiences using the WWW; librarians’ ideas of quality driven by work assignments


How have perceptions changed

How Have Perceptions Changed?

  • Desired characteristics of quality not drastically different from 19th to 21st century

  • Difference in technology and user expectations

  • Challenges:

    • Gain a better understanding of cataloger perception of quality cataloging – how does it influence their work?

    • How realistic is this perception in the face of increased reliance upon copy cataloging & technology, budget cuts, and decreasing emphasis on cataloging education in library schools?


A study of catalogers perception of cataloging quality past present

Thank you!

[email protected]


Works cited

Works Cited

  • Boston Athenaeum & Cutter, C.A. (1880). Catalogue of the Library of the Boston Athenaeum. 1807-1871. Part IV. Boston.

  • Bruce, T.R. & Hillmann, D.I. (2004). The continuum of metadata quality: Defining, expressing, exploiting. In D.I. Hillmann & E.L. Westbrooks (Eds.), Metadata in Practice (pp.238-256). Chicago: American Library Association.

  • Davis, C.C. (1989). Results of a survey on record quality in the OCLC database. Technical Services Quarterly 7(2), 43-53.

  • Elrod, J. M. (2008). The case for cataloguing education. The Serials Librarian 55(1/2), 1-10.

  • Fox, C., Levitin, A., & Redman, T. (1994). The notion of data and its quality dimensions. Information Processing & Management 30(1), pp.9-19.

  • Hafter, R. (1986). Academic librarians and cataloging networks: Visibility, quality control, and professional status. New York: Greenwood Press.

  • Hider, P. & Tan, K. (2008). Constructing record quality measures based on catalog use. Cataloging & Classification Quarterly 46(4), pp. 338-360.

  • Intner, S.S. (1989, Feb. 1). Much ado about nothing: OCLC and RLIN cataloging quality. Library Journal 114(2), 38-40.


Works cited1

Works Cited

  • Library of Congress Cataloging Forum. (1993). Cataloging quality is…five perspectives. Opinion Papers, No. 4, Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress.

  • Library of Congress Cataloging Forum.(1995). Cataloging quality: A Library of Congress Symposium. Opinion Papers, No. 6. Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress.

  • Luquire, W. (1976, Aug.). Selected factors affecting library staff perceptions of an innovative system: A study of ARL libraries in OCLC. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Indiana University.

  • OCLC. (2009). Online catalogs: What users and librarians want: An OCLC report. Dublin, OH.

  • Osborn, A.D. (1941). The crisis in cataloging. In M. Carpenter & E. Svenonius (Eds.), Foundations of cataloging: A sourcebook (pp.92-103). Littleton, CO: Libraries Unlimited.

  • Statistics Canada. (2002). Statistics Canada’s Quality Assurance Framework. Retrieved January 10, 2010 from http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/12-586-x/12-586-x2002001-eng.pdf

  • Tenopir, C. (1990). Database quality revisited. Library Journal 115(16), pp.64-67.

  • Thomas, S.E. (1996, Winter). Quality in bibliographic control. Library Trends 44(3), 491-506.


  • Login