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Transition Essentials To Prepare Students for Adult Life. 2007 Oklahoma Parent Conference. Jim Martin, Chen-Ya Juan, and Cathy Witten Zarrow Center University of Oklahoma Email: jemartin@ou.edu Phone: 405-325-8951. Agenda. Purpose of SPED Transition Education Big Ideas

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Transition Essentials To Prepare Students for Adult Life

2007 Oklahoma Parent Conference

Jim Martin, Chen-Ya Juan, and Cathy Witten

Zarrow Center

University of Oklahoma

Email: jemartin@ou.edu

Phone: 405-325-8951


Agenda

  • Purpose of SPED

  • Transition Education Big Ideas

  • Seven Transition Education Steps


Question?

  • What is the purpose of special education as defined by IDEA 2004?


The Purpose of SPED

. . . a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet students’ unique needs and to prepare them for further education,employment, and independent living.


“High school is a make-or-break time for kids with disabilities and, for too many, it’s a break time that’s why comprehensive transition planning must begin no later than age 14.”

-Thomas Hehir

Former Director

US DOE, OSEP


Transition Big Idea #1

Parents and educators and students need to decide:

Where will the student live?

Where will the student work?

Where will the student receive job training?

Where will the student receive education after high school?


Transition Big Idea #2

Design the high school years to ensure that students have the opportunity and gain the skills needed to achieve post-school education, employment, and living goals.


Transition Big Idea #3

To enable students to attain postschool goals, involve students in identifying and making linkages to post-school supports and programs before exiting the school system.


Taxonomy for Transition Education

Family Involvement

Student-Focused Planning

Program Structures

Student Development

Interagency Collaboration


Transition Education Opportunities

  • Structure activities for students to think, talk, and plan about the future.

  • Jointly plan with educators, students, and family a course of study to make the high school experience directly relate to students’ dreams and goals for the future.


Seven Transition Steps

  • Involve student in IEP Planning Process

  • Team completes a three-part transition assessment process.

  • Team Writes Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance

  • Team develops course of study

  • Team develops postschool linkages

  • Students work on attaining IEP and personal goals

  • Families and students build a Student-Directed Summary of Performance


Step 1: Involve Student in IEP Planning Process

  • Teach students to become active participants in own IEP meeting

    • Learn terms and process

    • Students write script of what to say and when

    • Practice

    • Provide opportunities for students to speak at IEP meetings


Teacher-Directed: What Percent Did These People Talk?


Who Talked at IEP Meetings?


Self-Directed IEP - 11 Lessons

  • Begin meeting by stating purpose.

  • Introduce everyone.

  • Review past goals and performance.

  • Ask for others’ feedback.

  • State your school and transition goals.

  • Ask questions if you do not understand.

  • Deal with differences in opinion.

  • State what support you will need.

  • Summarize your goals.

  • Close meeting by thanking everyone.

  • Work on IEP goals all year.


Self-Directed IEP: What Percent Did These People Talk?


Student-Directed: What % Did These People Talk?


Answer This Question

Who talked most about transition?


The IEP Team consists of students, family, educators, and support staff. All -especially the student and family - must communicate to develop an effective and meaningful plan.


IEP Team Purpose

IEP teams needs to take along-term view and build an IEP to facilitate attainment of postschool goals.

Begin With Postschool Goals

Begin each IEP meeting with a discussion of postschool goals and involve the student and family as much as possible in this discussion.


Self-Directed IEP Available From

  • Sopris West

  • 4093 Specialty Place

  • Longmont, CO 80504

  • Phone: (303) 651-2829

  • Fax: (888) 819-7767

  • www.sopriswest.com


Self-Advocacy Strategy

Edge Enterprise

P.O. Box 1304

Lawrence, KS 66044

A Student’s Guide

NICCY

P.O. Box 1492

Washington, DC 20013

www.nichcy.org/

NEXT S.T.E.P.

PRO-Ed

8700 Shoal Creek Blvd

Austin, TX 78757

www.proedinc.com

More IEP Teaching Materials


Step Two

Team Completes a Three-Part Transition Assessment Process


Three-Part Transition Assessment

  • 1. Self-Determination Skills

    • AIR SD Assessment (www.ou.edu/zarrow click on self-determination button)

  • 2. Transition Skills (Adaptive Behavior)

    • caseylifeskills.org

    • parent, student, support staff version

  • 3. Vocational Interests and Skills

  • - ON-Line Assessments (free!!!)

  • - Choose and Take Action vocational assessment

  • software

JM


Self-Determination Constructs

• Self-awareness

• Self-advocacy

• Self-efficacy

• Decision-making

• Independent performance

• Self-evaluation

• Adjustment


AIR Self-Determination Assessment

  • Parent Version

  • Teacher Version

  • Student Version

  • Available at

    • www.ou.edu/zarrow/sdetermination.html

  • Cost: free


www.ou.edu/zarrow


ChoiceMaker SD Assessment

  • Curriculum Referenced Assessment

    • Choosing Goals

    • Participating in IEP Meetings

    • Taking Action on Goals

  • Sopris West (search by author: Martin)

    • www.sopriswest.com

  • Cost: $12.95 for 25 copies


Transition Assessments

  • Transition Planning Inventory (TPI)

    • ProEd, Austin Texas (www.proedinc.com)

  • Enderle-Severson Transition Rating Form

    • www.estr.net

  • Casey Life Skills

    • www.caseylifeskills.org


Transition Planning Inventory

  • Home version

  • Teacher version

  • Student version

  • CD version speaks to students or parents and automatically scores


Scales of Independent Behavior-R

  • SIB-R Scales (norm referenced)

    • Community and personal living skills

    • Social interaction and communication

    • Motor skills

    • Overall measure of independence

    • 14 adaptive behavior & 8 problem behavior areas

  • Available From

    • http://www.riverpub.com/

    • Riverside Publishing

  • Cost: $248


Casey Life Skills - Why Look Anywhere Else?

  • Web based and FREE!!!

  • Spanish or English, with numerous supplemental assessments

  • Youth and caregiver formats

  • Automatically scored and sent to you

  • Can obtain class summaries

  • Provides different levels of questions for students across functioning levels

  • www.caseylifeskills.org


www.caseylifeskills.org

JM


Vocational Interest Assessment

Part 3 of the 3-Part Transition Assessment Process


Vocational Interests for High Achieving Students With Mild Disabilities

  • Group Interest Inventories

    • ACT Discover

    • ACT Explorer

  • U.S. Dept of Labor O*NET

    • www.onetcenter.org

    • Interest profiler, ability profiler


Individualized Interest Inventories

  • Paper Individual Interest Inventories

    • Strong Interest Inventory

    • Self-Directed Search

  • On-Line Individual Interest Inventories

    • http://www.myfuture.com/toolbox/workinterest.html

    • www.ioscar.org

    • http://www.careerkey.org/cgi-bin/ck.pl?action=choices

    • www.careervoyages.com

    • www.careerclusters.org (download in pdf format)


Exploration of Interest Results

  • Occupational Outlook Handbook

    • www.bls.gov/oco/home.htm

    • www.bls.gov/k12/index.htm

  • Job videos (English or Spanish)

    • Individuals & Job clusters

    • http://acinet.org/acinet/videos.asp?id=27,&nodeid=27

    • www.careervoyages.com

      • Uses the above videos in an interactive format


Career Awareness & Exploration

  • Watching

    • Video

      • http://acinet.org/acinet/videos.asp?id=27,&nodeid=27

      • Provides numerous videos for students to watch

        • English or Spanish

        • Job cluster and skill categories

        • Horse Training

        • Coast Guard Assistant

        • Construction Workers

        • Teaching Assistants

    • Live in the Community

  • Doing

    • Short exploration periods

    • Long-term try-outs


What If Some Can’t Read?


Career Development Theory

• Career Awareness

• Career Exploration

• Career Preparation

• Beginning Career

Need Exposure to Available Jobs


WRIOT2: Wide Range Interest and Occupation Test 2

Available: www.proedinc.com

Cost: appx $200 for entire package


COPS-PIC

  • Non-Verbal Assessment of Occupational Interest

  • EDITS / P.O. Box 7234 / San Diego, CA 92167

  • 800-416-1666 / 619-222-1666 / Fax 619-226-1666

  • 25 copies for $50.90


Functional Assessment Process

  • Over time

  • Repeated Measures Situational Assessment


Situational Assessment

  • The most commonly used work evaluation approach in high school community based programs


Char I Like vs Here

Compares initial preferences to those experienced at a particular job site.


Key: Determine Match Between What I Like and What’s At This Site


Characteristics Graph


Resource

  • Self-Directed Employment

    • Paul Brookes Publishing

    • Baltimore

    • www.brookespublishing.com


Choose and Take Action

Vocational Assessment Software

Use of a software program and community experiences to identify entry-level job interests


CTA Constructs

  • 1. Vocational Choice Making

    • Characteristics

    • Setting

    • Activities (jobs)

  • 2. Planning

  • 3. Community Experience

    • Watch

    • Do

  • 4. Self-Evaluation

  • 5. Choose Again with Adjustment


JM


JM


JM


Publisher

Choose and Take Action: Finding a Job for You

Sopris West

4093 Specialty Place

Longmont, CO 80504

800.547.6747

www.sopriswest.com


Step 3: Team Writes Present Level of Academic and Functional Performance

  • Teach and facilitate students and families to express the transition present level of performance statement.

  • Use the Student-Directed Transition Planning program to help students and families to learn how to express their own present level of transition performance

    • http://www.ok-ahead.org/test/indextest.html


Step Four: Team Develops Course of Study

  • Develop course of study

    • Listing of courses, extracurricular activities, and community activities to enable students to reach postsecondary goals

  • Teach students to become engaged in developing their own course of study


Plan of Study Problems

  • Many IEPs contain poorly developed Plans of Study

  • Students lack input into Plan

  • Plan often doesn’t reflect student interest or school school vision (Martin & Cooper, 2002)


Step Five: Team Develops Postschool Linkages

  • Develop transition service linkages to assist student to obtain postsecondary goals

    • Linkages to service provides

      • Rehab

      • College or postsecondary education disability support office

      • Supported employment program

      • Transportation support


Step 6: Students Work On Attaining IEP and Personal Goals

  • Teach students to attain their own Goals - both IEP and personal

  • Use the Take Action process to teach goal attainment

JM


Task Improvement Form


Resource

  • Self-Directed Employment

    • Paul Brookes Publishing

    • Baltimore

    • www.brookespublishing.com


Take Action: An Overview

  • Teaches students to a process to attain their own goals.

  • Seven lessons

  • Seven to 10 days, 50 minutes a day

  • Student will take info and infuse into his or her IEP meeting & into academic coursework

  • Designed for students with high incidence disabilities or for general ed students

JM


Write The Steps in the Correct Order from 1 to 4.

JM


JM


Take Action Available From

  • Sopris West Publishers

  • 4093 Specialty Place

  • Longmont, CO 80504

  • Phone: (303) 651-2829

  • Fax: (888) 819-7767

  • www.sopriswest.com

JM


Step 7: Write Student-Directed Summary of Performance

  • Students start writing own summary of performance their first year in high school

    • Provide guidance once gone from school


All lessons and associated materials can be found at:www.ok-ahead.org/test/index.html


Collaborative Effort


Questions


For More Information Contact:

Jim Martin, Chen-Ya Juan, & Cathy Witten

University of Oklahoma

Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment

Carpenter Hall Room 111

Norman, OK 73019

Phone: 405-325-8951

E-mail: jemartin@ou.edu

E-mail: juanportley@ou.edu


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