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Child-Parent Centers : A Title I-Funded Model for Promoting Educational Success Arthur J. Reynolds University of Minnesota August 11, 2009 Brooklyn Park, MN. Impact of State PreK on Readiness. YearChange (mths) New Mexico 20073-4 Arkansas 20073 New Jersey 20073-4

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Impact of State PreK on Readiness

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Impact of state prek on readiness

Child-Parent Centers:A Title I-Funded Model for Promoting Educational SuccessArthur J. ReynoldsUniversity of MinnesotaAugust 11, 2009Brooklyn Park, MN


Impact of state prek on readiness

Impact of State PreK on Readiness

YearChange (mths)

New Mexico 20073-4

Arkansas 20073

New Jersey 20073-4

Oklahoma 20053

Tulsa, OK 20056

Synthesis of 20013-4

7 states/cities


Impact of state prek on readiness

Common Paths from Early Childhood to Adult Well-Being

Adolescence to Adulthood

Early Childhood

Ages 3-9

Ages 5-12

Motivation

Self-efficacy

Perceived competence

Persistence in learning

Exogenous Conditions

Gender

Socio-Environmental

Risk

Neighborhood

Attributes

MA

MA

Competence Behaviors

School Achievement

and Performance

School Remediation

Delinquency and Crime

Child Maltreatment

Participation in Social

Services

Health & Mental Health

Educational Attainment

Economic Well-Being

Family Circumstances

Developed Abilities

Cognitive development

Literacy skills

Pre-reading/numeracy skills

CA

CA

Program

Participation

Timing

Duration

Intensity

Social Adjustment

Classroom adjustment

Peer relations

Self-regulating skills

SA

SA

FS

FS

Family Support

Parent-child interactions

Home support for learning

Participation in school

Parenting skills

SS

MA= Motivational Advantage

CA = Cognitive Advantage

SA = Social Adjustment

FS = Family Support

SS = School Support

SS

School Support

Quality of school environment

Classroom environment

School-level performance


Key point

Key Point

Only high-quality early education

programs that follow key principles of

effectiveness will have reliable and

enduring effects on children’s school

success.


Cpc background

CPC Background

2nd Oldest Federally-Funded Preschool Program

Oldest and Most Integrated Preschool plus School-Age Intervention

Unique Blend of Child Education and Family Support


Title i history

Title I History

Chicago first district to use Title I for preschool (1967)

District 10 Superintendent Lorraine Sullivan developed program with much local collaboration

Today <5% of Title I goes to preschool


Impact of state prek on readiness

Goal of Title I Act of 1965:

“Employ imaginative thinking and new approaches to meet the educational needs of poor children.”


Impact of state prek on readiness

CPC Major Foci

Basic skills: Language, Numeracy, Listening

Structured Learning Activities

Language and literacy emphasis

Field Trips: Zoos, Museums, Libraries

Parent Involvement:

Classroom volunteering

Parent room activities

Educational workshops and training

Home visits and activities

Organizational Structure

Staffing patterns and Coordination


Parent resource room

Parent Resource Room


Impact of state prek on readiness

Key Elements for Improving Well-Being

Child language, numeracy, and social skills

Continuity of learning experiences

Family-school partnerships

Reduce social isolation

Increase school/residential stability

Parenting practices

Parents’ attainments & economic well-being


Child parent centers

Child-Parent Centers

Child-Parent Center

Preschool/Kindergarten

(Wing or Building)

Elementary School

Grades 1 to 3

Principal

Head Teacher

Curriculum Parent-Resources Teacher

Outreach

Services

Parent

Component

Curriculum

Component

Health

Services

Parent

Component

Curriculum

Component

School-Wide

Services

Reduced Class Size

Teacher Aides

Instructional Materials

Individualized Instruction

Inservice Training

School-Community

Representative

Resource Mobilization

Home Visitation

Parent Conferences

Parent Resource Teacher

Parent Room Activities

Classroom Volunteering

School Activities

Home Support

Language Focus

Small Class Sizes

Inservice Training

Health Screening

Nursing Services

Free + Reduced-

Price meals

Parent Room Activities

Classroom Volunteering

School Activities

Home Support

Health Services

School-Community

Representative

Free + Reduced-

Price meals

Resource Mobilization

Age 3

To

Age 9


Cpc staffing

CPC Staffing

  • Head Teacher

  • Parent Resource Teacher

  • School-Community Representative

  • Teachers and aides

  • School nurse, psychologist, social worker

  • Preschool class size was 17 to 2

  • Kindergarten, school age was 25 to 2

  • School-age program had coordinator called curriculum-parent resource teacher


Johnson child parent center

Johnson Child-Parent Center


Brief cls sample description

Brief CLS Sample Description

  • 989 complete cohort of children graduating from Child-Parent Centers in kindergarten; they participated from 2 to 6 years. Centers are located in the highest poverty areas of Chicago.

  • 550 children enrolled in an alternative early childhood program in kindergarten in five randomly selected schools serving low-income families. They matched on socioeconomic status.


Cpc preschool and readiness

CPC Preschool and Readiness


Education and crime age 24

Education and Crime-Age 24

ProgCompDiff

HS completion79.4% 70.7%8.7%*

Incarceration20.4% 26.1%-5.7%*

or jail

Felony arrest16.521.1%-4.6%*


Benefit cost ratios for child programs

Benefit-Cost Ratios for Child Programs


Key elements of effectiveness for early education programs

Key Elements of Effectiveness for Early Education Programs

1.Target Children at Risk

2.Begin Early (by age 4)

3.Duration-More is Better

4.High Intensity of Services

  • Small Class Sizes and Child-Staff Ratios


Key elements of effectiveness

Key Elements of Effectiveness

6.Highly Trained Teachers who are Compensated Well

7.Comprehensive Family Services

8.Compensatory Focus

9.Provide Transition Services into Kindergarten and early grades

10. Strong Accountability System


Common elements of preschool showing high returns

Common Elements of Preschool Showing High Returns

1.Opportunity for More than 1 Year of Participation.

2.Well-trained and Compensated Teachers.

3.Class Sizes under 18 and Child to Staff Ratios less than 9 to 1.

4.Instruction that is Diverse & Literacy Rich.

5.Comprehensive Family Services.

6.Average Yearly Cost per Child no Less than $5,000 (2007 dollars).


Further information

Further Information

Human Capital Research Collaborative

www.humancapitalrc.org

Chicago Longitudinal Study

www.cehd.umn.edu/icd/cls/

[email protected]


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