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A Professional Conversation with Connecticut Technical Educators. Outcomes. Overview of SEED Evaluation and Support Model Exploration of Student Growth and Development (45%) Analysis of an SLO Exploration of Teacher Performance and Practice (40%) Reveal Promising Practices.

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A Professional Conversation with Connecticut Technical Educators

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A professional conversation with connecticut technical educators

A Professional Conversation

with

Connecticut Technical Educators

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Outcomes

Outcomes

Overview of SEED Evaluation and Support Model

Exploration of Student Growth and Development (45%)

Analysis of an SLO

Exploration of Teacher Performance and Practice (40%)

Reveal Promising Practices

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


The satisfactions of teaching

The Satisfactions of Teaching

How we teach is ultimately a reflection

of why we teach~ Elliot Eisner

  • Great ideas

  • Immortality

  • The Performance

  • Artistry

  • A Passion for Learning

  • Making a Difference


A professional conversation with connecticut technical educators

Connecticut State Department of Education


When teachers succeed students succeed

When teachers succeed, students succeed.

When teachers succeed, students succeed.

Research has proven that no

school-level factor matters more to

students’ success than high-quality

teachers and leaders.

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


To support teachers

To support teachers…

…we need to define effective practice.

…we need accurate, useful information about teachers’

strengths and areas in need of development.

…we need to provide on-going opportunities for growth

throughout the career continuum through effective

professional learning and other types of support.

…we must develop systems for meaningful recognition

of accomplishment throughout the career continuum.

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Teacher evaluation categories

Teacher Evaluation Categories

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Teacher evaluation categories1

Teacher Evaluation Categories

OUTCOME RATING

ANNUAL TEACHER RATING

PRACTICE RATING

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Teacher evaluation process

Teacher Evaluation Process

Mid-Year Check-in

Goal-Setting & Planning

End-of-Year Review

By November 15, 2012

January/February 2013

By June 30, 2013*

*If state test data may have a significant impact on a final rating, a final rating may be revised by September 15 when state test data are available.

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Why evaluation matters

Why evaluation matters

  • Supporting great educators

    • Key to developing, supporting and improving the effectiveness of educators as well as recognizing the outstanding performance of our most effective teachers and leaders

  • Teachers have a profound influence

    • An effective teacher can change the course of a student’s life. Research shows that one of the most important school-based factors influencing a student’s achievement is the quality of his or her teacher.

  • Focus on regular feedback

    • When the feedback is specific and actionable and delivered in a constructive, non-confrontational manner, the individual comes away feeling valued and appreciated, which results in a higher level of satisfaction in their work – all of which contribute to higher quality academic performance.

    • Multiple measures of effectiveness

    • To determine overall educator effectiveness, the Connecticut System for Educator Evaluation considers four components: Professional Performance and Practice, Student Learning Outcomes, Parent or Peer Feedback and Whole-school or Student Feedback.

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


A professional conversation with connecticut technical educators

Exploring Student Growth and Development (45%)

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


What are student learning objectives

What are Student Learning Objectives?

A long-term academic goal

  • Broad statements about the knowledge and skills that students will demonstrate as a result of instruction;

  • Address the central purpose of the teacher’s assignment;

  • Take into account baseline data on student performance;

  • Pertain to a large proportion of a teacher’s students;

  • Reflect content mastery or skill development;

  • Reflect attainable but ambitious goals for student learning; and

  • Are measured by indicators of academic growth and development (IAGDs).

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


What are iagds

What are IAGDs?

Measurements of student outcomes

  • Are based on results of assessments, which may include standardized and non-standardized measures;

  • May require consultation with colleagues with more expertise to determine appropriate measures and targets;

  • Indicator statements for the teacher evaluation should follow SMART Goal language: Specific/Strategic, Measurable, Aligned/Attainable, Results-Oriented and Time-Bound; and

  • There must be at least one IAGD per SLO.

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Slo process

SLO

Phase1:

Review

Data

SLO

Phase 2:

Set goals for

student

learning

SLO

Phase 3:

Monitor

students

progress

SLO

Phase 4:

Assess student

outcomes relative to goals

SLO Process


Principals that support effective slos

Principals that support effective SLOs

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Let s work through an slo

Let’s work through an SLO…

Grade 12 –Pre-Engineering

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Sample slo grade 12 robotics

Sample SLO-Grade 12 Robotics

Standards and Learning Content:

Industry Standards:

EIA-11M-R Students will develop the abilities to apply the design process

EIA-10-I-L Students will understand troubleshooting, R&D, innovation and problem solving

CCSS:

SL.11-12.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and expressively.

Student Learning Objective:

Students will demonstrate an understanding of how to program robots and computers that control manufacturing automation, with an emphasis on the team approach to problem solving in a work environment.

Rationale:

As students progress through this curriculum, they will build a foundation of knowledge from which they will draw upon when given new tasks in their future careers. The industry requires employees to have all of the problem solving, critical thinking, and team effort skills that are embedded in this objective and the curriculum, and so I will be simultaneously preparing students to be career-ready.

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


So what is assessment

So…What is Assessment?

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Measuring student outcomes

Measuring student outcomes

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Sources of evidence for slo

Sources of Evidence for SLO

Certification Tests:

Seniors are required to take certification tests in various content areas of the curriculum. One of which is the ES-4 Digital Electronics Certification Test. In addition, beginning 2013-2014 students will be given a ES-5 Robotics and Automation Certification Test and a LEAN certification test which signifies training and knowledge in the evaluation of assembly line and manufacturing efficiency.

The ES-4 Digital Electronics Certification Test is administered by our school certification coordinator. In addition, the ES-5 Robotics/Automation Certification Test and the LEAN certification test will be given beginning in the 2013-2014 school year. The tests are scored by ISCET and RIMES and results of the certifications are sent to the students as well as the school directly from the national headquarters of ISCET and RIMES.

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Sources of evidence for slo1

Sources of Evidence for SLO

Senior Project:

  • Students will complete a senior project, in which teams of students are presented with a real world problem in manufacturing engineering and the ROV (Remote Operated Vehicle) Industry and are required to program a robot or computer to address the problem. The project will be assessed on a rubric that is aligned to industry standards (4 domains). The rubric also includes a score for working as a member of a team and a score for successfully solving the problem.

  • The Senior Projects will be presented the last month of school. Students will have 3 weeks of class time to work in their groups. Final presentations of their projects will take place the last week of class.

  • The project and project rubric were developed in collaboration with another teacher of this same course in another district. The senior projects will be co-scored by me and a colleague of mine with a strong background in this content area.

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Sample slo grade 12 robotics1

Sample SLO-Grade 12 Robotics

Baseline Data:

  • 95% of graduating students who have taken the certification tests within the past 3 years have successfully passed. These same students had an average score of 75% on the senior project.

  • After 4 weeks of introductory work with my current students, this group appears to have a strong set of foundational skills. There are two groups of students who have specific areas of weakness, but I do not believe any will require a corresponding target, but will merely need strategic supports throughout the year.

    • Group 1: Four of the students have lower math skills and will need additional explanation, re-teaching, or practice.

    • Group 2: Seven of the students struggle reading informational text and require comprehension strategies and vocabulary support

      Indicator(s) of Academic Growth and Development (IAGD)

      A) Certification Tests:

      By June, all students 22/22 (100%) will successfully pass all of the certifications.

      B) Senior Project:

      By June, all teams will score at least 24 points out of a total of 30 possible points

      (approx. 80%) on a rubric aligned to industry standards.

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Effective assessment will

Effective assessment will…

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Think pair share

Think, pair, share…

What assessments are you currently using?

Are those assessments measuring what you want them to measure?

Are they useful?

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Slo approval

SLO Approval

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Levels of performance

Levels of Performance

Each district shall define effectiveness and ineffectiveness utilizing a pattern of summative ratings derived from the new evaluation system..

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


A professional conversation with connecticut technical educators

Exploring Teacher Performance and Practice (40%)

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


A closer look at practice

A Closer Look at Practice


Performance and practice

Performance and Practice

  • Comprehensive review of teaching practice

  • Conducted through multiple observations

  • Evaluated against a standards-based rubric

  • Provide specific feedback to identify strong practice and areas for growth

  • Tailored support


Promising practices

Promising Practices

  • Structured dialogue

  • Collaborative learning communities

  • Complementary Observers/Peer Practice Coaches

  • Job embedded professional learning

  • Connections between research and practice

  • Differentiated career pathway


A professional conversation with connecticut technical educators

Connecticut State Department of Education


Teacher as decision maker

Teacher as Decision Maker

Reflection about one’s experiences is a cornerstone of professional competence

(York-Barr, Sommers, Ghere & Montie, 2006)

Content expertise to establish rationale for goal setting

Collaborative reflective practice as a problem solving strategy

Intentional collection of artifacts and documented experiences to support work (portfolios, parent/student feedback, professional organizations, enrichment programs etc.)

Connecticut State Department of Education


What is your contribution

What is Your Contribution?

Planning sequences

Student work portfolios

New learning related to your focus area(s)

Work as a cooperating/mentor teacher

Parent/Community outreach

Principal Tip!

Be discriminating about what you want to collect and share. Point to specifics as they relate to your professional practice and/or progress toward SLOs.

Connecticut State Department of Education


What are some additional sources of evidence for the 40

What are some additional sources of evidence for the 40%

Discuss possibilities at your table group…

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


Some final thoughts

Some final thoughts…

  • Here and Now vs. Forward Thinking

  • Areas for Improvement/Areas for Growth

  • Shared responsibility for student growth

  • Feedback connected to professional learning

    We must acknowledge the complexities and challenges whilerecognizing the potential!


For additional information

For additional information…

Visit: www.connecticutseed.org

Contact: Kim Wachtelhausen

Educator Effectiveness and Professional Learning

CT State Department of Education

[email protected]

860-713-6841

CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


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